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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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You are welcome....but it is a shortcut.   I will always continue to urge folks to line off their hulls.   It gets a bit tiring sometimes as many just think its too hard or daunting.  Then they wonder why their planking looks "off".  I will admit that it isnt fun to do.   But it does make the planking process more fun and easy afterwards.  And the results can not be argued with.  My hope is that after doing it for folks just this once, that when they plank the Winnie hull they will see how different it looks.   They will recognize how important it is to have a planking plan developed so when they plank the next model.....they will give it a try.

 

Here is the other tutorial I did on the subject which also includes some info on spiling.  Its my presentation on the subject when I give one at conferences and meetings.

 

http://modelshipworldforum.com/resources/Framing_and_Planking/Lining Off your hull for planking.pdf

 

Chuck

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On 7/11/2019 at 5:27 PM, Chuck said:

 

Chuck, are you planning on providing the spiling templates too? 😀 There is too much variation in each model to do that realistically isn’t there? These tick strips are an awesome idea though - especially for the belt layouts, I have a hard time getting them to flow correctly with equal spacing... This will be great as I am a visual learner and if I see it done right I can usually get the hang of it.....

Edited by ASAT

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No you will have to pre shape each plank but I will explain how I do it.   The last thing I need is to pre-spile 180 planks so you guys can have it even easier....LOL.    Everyone does it differently anyway.   On this particular model I wont be spiling the planks at all.   I will be edge bending them all after tapering them.  No need to cut them from a flat sheet to the correct curve.  The hull is so large that the curve needed at the bow or stern is not that sharp.   It should go very easily.   I am also going to try making a video of the process.  Because every strake is lined off on the hull you already know its width and length and how it should be shaped.   The rest is easy....

 

I will start planking this weekend.

 

Basically I do this.....in this order.  I will try and detail each step.   Just five steps.  I dont clamp.....I dont wet my planks.

 

1.  Taper a planking strip using my lining out at each bulkhead to find the width at each bulkhead.

2.  Edge-bend the strip with heat after cutting the taper.  

3.  Twist the strip to fit on the hull if needed with heat.  Every strip (especially at the bow and stern) needs to be bent, then twisted to lay flat against the bulkheads

4.  Test it in position.....repeat steps 1-3 until good fit-trim its length to fit my butt joint pattern.

5.  Bevel the edge of the strake with a sanding stick to fit tight against the plank already on the hull....line the edge with pencil to simulate caulking and glue it on. 

 

Repeat about 190 times ......until its all done!!!!  I estimated 4 planks in each strake multiplied by 23 strakes on each side.....

 

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10 hours ago, Tigersteve said:

Chuck- Your tutorials are so clear. People are lucky you’ve provided templates for lining off the hull. Next, people will be asking you to mail them completed models. 😆

Steve

OK, hey - ridicule! I guess we are right up there with Facebook, Twitter and the like......

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Guys I dont mind being asked.   I usually do a lot more with these projects than most so its a fair question.   But rest assured, you guys will do a great job on the planking.  The hull size makes things much easier.   If you are using the cedar that is an advantage as well.  It is very pliable and bends so easy.   You can literally tie thinner pieces into a knot.   Its just a matter of going slow and getting a tight fit.  Having the lining off completed will allow you guys to really concentrate on the craftsmanship  aspect of planking and getting some really tight joints.

 

My only advice.....try not to over analyze things.  It causes "analysis paralysis" ....just dive in and start making some progress, otherwise your shop floor will remain too clean and absent of sawdust.  :D  This is a long term project so you need to get started and build up some momentum....otherwise it will never get finished.  You will figure it all out once its on your work table.

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I must admitt, without all the assistance you provide chuck, people like me would probably never start such a model projekt. If I come home after work I have about 1 hour time every second or third day to go into the Workshop and make some progress. You make it all very easy, so fulltime busy people still can have some model-building fun and make some progress late in the evening. 

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Thank you for saying...that alone makes it all worthwhile to do.  I am glad you have started cutting and gluing parts.  I do wish more would dive in and get some progress made.  That is the hardest part.  Just get started and the rest will fall into place.  :D

 

Chuck

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58 minutes ago, Beckmann said:

I must admitt, without all the assistance you provide chuck, people like me would probably never start such a model projekt. If I come home after work I have about 1 hour time every second or third day to go into the Workshop and make some progress. You make it all very easy, so fulltime busy people still can have some model-building fun and make some progress late in the evening. 

This is really an excellent point, and I think is probably why most people don't even try to take on a project of this nature.  I think I have the same amount of free time that you do, Beckmann.   Chuck, those templates look great!

 

Alan

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Started planking the belts today below the wales.  Let me describe how I plank at the bow by edge bending rather than spiling the curved planks from sheets.  You guys should give it a try.  The first belt uses 1/4" wide planking strips exclusively.  They are 3/64" thick.

 

I will break it sown into steps and hopefully this reads well.  I took still photos from the port side and I will do it again using video when I plank the starboard side.  

 

1. - Take a strip and sand the angle to fit the stem.  It will require beveling.  Then mark the width of the plank from your lining off on that front edge.  lets taper the plank for the bow.

bowplanking.jpg

2. - Then mark the locations for the bulkheads (the front edge with the tick marks).  Dont obsess over the locations...you can just approximate.

bowplanking1.jpg

3.  Take a scrap length of 1/4" strip so you can mark the width of the plank at each bulkhead.  

bowplanking2.jpg

4.  Transfer that mark to that bulkhead mark on your plank.

bowplanking3.jpg

5.  Then connect the dots with a sharp pencil using a straight edge.  Then use a sanding stick, or blade to file the taper into your plank.

bowplanking4.jpg

6. So far so good....but as many folks do, if you tried to force this plank on the hull it wont go well for you at this point.  If you force the plank against the one already on the hull, the top edge pulls away from the hull dramatically.  The photo below shows this....I even dropped a toothpick in the gap so you guys can see it better.  You will never be able to force that top edge down.  Instead, some builder create a creative run for the plank which is historically incorrect.  OR they start putting the first of about five stealers and drop planks.   Not the way to go.   This plank needs to be curved to fit the shape of the hull while laying flat against the bulkhead edges.  Here is one way to do this.  My favorite way.....EDGE BENDING>

bowplanking5.jpg

7. To bend the plank edge-wise, create a simple hold down device for the strip (center).  Its just a 3/64" thick piece of scrap with a small length glued on top.  Once clamped to your bench, the planks is held down by it.  Note how the top edge is curved.  I also clamp the forward end of the plank and the other end while edge-bending it dry.  Now you can see that the plank is starting to lift up.  Bend it until it just starts to lift up.  Clamp it down but use some scrap on top of the plank so the clamps dont damage the strip.  I prefer dry heat bending....but if you must....just dip your finger in some clean water and run it down the area of the strip being bent.  Not a lot.....just to wet it a bit.   I am doing this for each plank.

bowplanking6.jpg

8.  NOW...I bet you thought I would be using a hair dryer to heat - bend this plank.  I do use one.....BUT, I have since switched to something different.  It works even better!!!!  Its great for wider planks.  I still use the hair dryer to twist and bend strips the other way.  But at the bow....you only need to edge bend it.  Note that the strip is already flattened out where it was starting to lift....you are ironing it flat again.  Works great.  This is a travel iron...its really small.  They only cost about $20.  I use this only for edge-bending and then switch to a hair dryer for twisting and other bends.   They are not as hot as those soldering iron things with the fancy tips.  Those get super hot....too hot.  This small travel iron gets to around 400 degrees and you can adjust it.  I use it on a pretty hot setting....around 300 - 350 degrees.

bowplanking7.jpg

9.  Below is the plank I bent in comparison to a straight plank.   You dont have to bend them all that much.  Sometimes when you test it on the model, there will still be lifting....that means you need a more severe bend.  So take it back and bend it some more.  

Other times you may not have bent it to the proper curve meaning the distance from the end of the plank at the bow for the center of the curve wasnt correct.  Then take it back and bend it again.  No big deal.  I find that the apex or center of the bend falls between the 2nd and 3rd bulkheads at the bow.  As you work your way towards the keel,  that location will change.  The severity of the curve will also change.

bowplanking8.jpg

10. Now I can take that strip and fit it in the rabbet and hold the plank with just one finger.  No forcing.  It lays flat against the bulkhead edges.  But note, there will be gaps between this plank and the one already on the hull.  You must tweak it so you get a tight fit with no gaps.  It may require some beveling too.  This is also when you check your taper to see if the plank fits within the tick marks you lined off on the bulkheads.  If it needs some tweaking so you can stay on "plan" with your lining off....do that before gluing it into position.   But once you have a good fit, cut the other end to length and darken the edge with a pencil to simulate the caulking.  Then glue it into position.  I do use CA for all my planking.  Its the only thing I use it for.  This plank below still needs some tweaking because there are gaps after bending.

bowplanking9.jpg

I managed to almost finish the first belt on the port side today.   I have just one last strake to put on.  Then I will switch to the Starboard side.  I work one belt at a time on each side.  Then I switch sides.   Here are some photos and it is starting to come together nicely.  I am sure I forgot to mention a few things on this long post but feel free to ask me any questions.   This is basically how I plank every hull after lining it off.   I must also mention that I bend and twist the strakes at the stern with the hair dryer to get the best fit after I establish the taper...just like I did above.

 

 

 

firstbelt2.jpg

 

bowplanking12.jpg

bowplanking13.jpg

 

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Nice demonstration. Instructive and detailed. Thanks Chuck. I will also adopt this technique. Just to buy this little iron travel 😉

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I have adapted Chuck's methodology for my planking practice. I rate myself as still a novice but this technique has immensely improved my results. To help with the tapering I have adopted using a Lee Valley miniature low angle block plane to approach the width line and then finish off with the sanding stick. I made a fairly long hand held clamping vice out of 2 pieces of maple about 16 inches long. One has a kerf cut in with  a shallow depth that the plank sits in. The kerf width is a shade under the plank thickness. The two beams are held together with wing nuts and screws and securely clamp the plank. This jig facilitates holding the plank firmly when running the block plane for the taper. For me it is just a time saver.

Joe

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yes you can use this method.  If you are using cedar, you can use a straight edge or metal ruler and a sharp blade to just cut the plank when tapering.  Then finish it off with a sanding stick.

 

Also,  with the cedar there is no need to bend the strip the other way.  It is so pliable that after edge-bending you are good to go.  

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One important thing I forgot to mention.  I am shifting the butt joints every TWO bulkheads using a 4 plank shift pattern as is typical.  Every two bulkheads.  If you only shifted one bulkhead which most folks do then the resulting pattern gets to busy and distracting.

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I was just asked via PM how you determine the size and shape of the curve before you bend the plank.  Excellent question.  Please if you have a question, dont hesitate to ask it in the open forum.  I am sure many of you have the same question.   Anyway....I forgot to show how I do that.  But luckily I have an image from the Cheerful project.  

 

To determine the curve need,   just hold the plank straight against the hull so it reveals the gap as shown below.   This will reveal the curve you need more or less.  I mark the widest point of the gap which is the apex of the curve.  I marl it on the plank with a pencil.  Then I take it to my "bending station"  and position the apex under my hold down device so it becomes the center of the bend.  I hope this clear.   Its very hard to describe in writing.  Once again you can see that the curve needed is not that severe.

 

plankgap.jpg

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OK - I have two questions:

 

1) How long do you need to keep the iron on the wood?

2) How long does the wood need to cool before you unclamp it?

 

OK - just thought of a 3rd question - if you're using a hair dryer, how long do you need to heat the wood?

 

Thanks -

John

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1) How long do you need to keep the iron on the wood?

 

Not very long....you will need to experiment.   Just a few minutes and move the iron back and forth just like you are ironing.   If you get too much spring-back...just bend it some more.  You will get a feel for it.  Once you wet the strip with your finger....just dip in a container of water and run it across the strip first.  When you apply the iron...it will sizzle as the water evaporates.   As far as the time and temp...it all depends on the type of wood you are using.  No absolutes.  You must experiment.  Cedar doesnt take long at all but boxwood will take longer.  Some things are best discovered by experimenting on some scrap wood in your shop.  Your conditions and equipment will vary from mine.  The important thing is the concept.

 

2) How long does the wood need to cool before you unclamp it?  Just a minute or so.

 

OK - just thought of a 3rd question - if you're using a hair dryer, how long do you need to heat the wood?  Same applies.  It depends on the thickness and type of wood.  Best way to find out is test it.  Just bend a few test strips and play with it.  It all depends on how hot your hair dryer is.  Some folks like to use a heat gun but I find those too hot and dangerous.

 

Should you guys give this a try please do share your thoughts and experiences in your build logs.   I am certain that the answers to the questions above will differ from person to person.   Like everything else, there is a learning curve!!!!  So keep at it until you have that "light bulb" "ahhaa" moment.  It would be good to see how you guys do this and what your opinions and experience were.   

 

Chuck

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i did try out chuks metod he write  about not spilling yust edge bending etc,

and am supriced how akkur it is ( after the 3 time is on the hull...😉 but on the cheerful)

i also used the iron to heat the plank, i was happy to use the template edge bending plank that was in the box for the confederacy.

it was so muth better this metod its now my favorite😆

 

svein-erik

20190901_180644.jpg

Studio_20190901_180851.jpg

20190901_180947.jpg

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it works like a charm......its my method of choice.....well done!!! Its a very quick method to use.  :)  It requires few tools.....you could always use any old full sized iron.  But having the smaller one is much better.  You also wont get in trouble from the admiral, LOL.

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19 minutes ago, Chuck said:

it works like a charm......its my method of choice.....well done!!! Its a very quick method to use.  :)  It requires few tools.....you could always use any old full sized iron.  But having the smaller one is much better.  You also wont get in trouble from the admiral, LOL.

ups🙊 i have the iron and i diddent tell my wife😲😉

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Just catching up after a vacation, Chuck. Great tutorials! One question regarding the tick strip patterns. Is it possible to add a small scale on these? From experience I have learned that downloadable patterns sometimes print out larger or smaller on different printers and this can create problems if the builder doesn't realize this.Also, I encourage each participant to make sure that they are printing at the "actual size" in their printer dialog box. This has solved many problems for me in the past.

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1 hour ago, Chuck said:

it works like a charm......its my method of choice.....well done!!! Its a very quick method to use.  :)  It requires few tools.....you could always use any old full sized iron.  But having the smaller one is much better.  You also wont get in trouble from the admiral, LOL.

Zap this if you feel it clutters up your topic Chuck, but here is a little iron I found ant Michael's.  It gets hot enough to make steam, but haven't charred any wood so far..

 

iron.jpg

Edited by Gregory

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Its quite pertinent to the discussion...I like the heaviness of the iron....even the small one does the trick.  I like the additional surface area better too. I really dont like those small heater things.   Just my preference.  You can heat up a 3" length of plank quickly if not a longer section and really press it down firmly with the iron.  You wont get the same affect on the plank with that.

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I used Chuck's method , here on my first build....... planks were edge bent all the way down to the garboard. i used a hair dryer on high heat....... get's plank hot real fast.  i also used rubbing alcohol 70% type, to wet the plank with my fingers........ the alcohol evaporates faster.

004.JPG

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