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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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2 hours ago, Chuck said:

Have a look at those lids in that photo of the contemporary model.  I will use brass strip and shape them just like that. 

 

1722156388_GunportDetail.jpg.ed8b813350a1c28e379d048652529b87.jpg

 

 

Not saying this is within my skill set, but your discussion of the port lids, and in the context of your beautiful model, do you think going this far ( the curved port lid )  would be too much?

 

Would they have been like that on the actual ship?

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Beautiful job on the planking !  I agree with you - the less is more approach works very well - heck I almost decided not to simulate caulking but have changed my mind there.  No treenails for sure.  Hopefully Ill be back in the shop this weekend after many honey dos to get the house ready for winter - which is coming early here in the Midwest.  Kudos to a brilliantly executed model so far !!!

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Yes they must be curved to match the hull shape or they wouldnt close.   Its the only way to make them.  Doesnt everyone?  That is a very extreme case you show and I suspect that is more warped than bent to match the hull curvature.  On our model it is much more subtle but should be there none the less. 

 

I plan to show that port closed as well so it is even more important that is matches the curved hull shape.

 

Chuck

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Sorry if this question has already been answered but with the planking do you cut the planks to the scale length? I looked at the photos and while I can see the plank shift I find it difficult to determine the plank length.

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Yes indeed.   Each plank is cut to length based on the shifting bulkheads.  Usually 4 planks per strake (or row of planks).  Sometimes you get lucky and there are only three.  But usually four planks cut to length.  They will all be different and you must custom cut the lengths (and widths with a taper) for each plank as you proceed. 

 

Chuck

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I added the stern post today.  I must say that it felt really good.  That closes out this second chapter and really finishes off the hull to the point where I feel I actually accomplished something.  Its a good feeling.   I am sure you guys will feel the same.

 

sternpostadded.jpg

I also forgot to post a comparison picture before I added the stern post.   But here it goes anyway.  I always think its interesting to see the progress on this new larger version against my smaller 3/16" scale version.   Here are two pictures.  My camera is much better now.  The old picture is dated 2011.  8 years ago or almost 9 years.  It doesnt feel that long.  I like the yellow cedar version better than the boxwood version.

 

sternpostadded1.jpg

plankingfixsweepsdone.jpg

 

 

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She's looking really good. One question. The stern looks flat in the photo.

Is there a subtle curve from the center to port and starboard or is it flat? Thanks

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On 11/5/2019 at 9:54 AM, sfotinos said:

How do you keep your model so clean?  Do you wear gloves?

 

Shawn

I asked him that clear back during Syren and Confederacy - I think he must be OCD about hand washing😀 I really think the key is just being meticulous and deliberate with every aspect of the build and yes, keeping everything clean.... work area, model, tools.... and your hands!

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2 minutes ago, ASAT said:

Primer?

 

I believe he's referring to applying a coat of wipe on poly or using a sanding sealer.

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I dont know the exact english word. It is very  dilute varnish. You usually apply it after sanding, before you start to paint the surface.   It closes the pores of the wood if you know what I mean.

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I am certainly no clean freak.  But seriously it gets plenty dirty.  Then I clean it up by sanding it lightly with some 320 grit sandpaper.  Then I apply some wipe on poly.   I am not really sure that I do much different then everyone else.  I think the better question to ask is why some hulls appear to get so dirty.  

 

Perfect timing though guys as I am about to upload chapter two in the downloads area.   With this out of the way I might get a start on building the stern and quarter galleries.

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I was just jokin, Chuck.... I know mine get dirty cause I use cyano for planking and a graphite pencil for caulking.... when they both get on your fingers it’s a mess.... but I do the same as you Chuck..... 320 and WOP when I am done for the sitting.....

Edited by ASAT

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26 minutes ago, ASAT said:

I was just jokin, Chuck.... I know mine get dirty cause I use cyano for planking and a graphite pencil for caulking.... when they both get on your fingers it’s a mess.... but I do the same as you Chuck..... 320 and WOP when I am done for the sitting.....

hi, i have discover that using graphite pensel for caulking on basswood its going to be dirty, but when i used on the yellow sedar 

it dossent stick on the wood as basswood! The wood makes a different!

 

svein erik

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Today I started working on the transom and quarter gallery construction.  We are just going to build the foundations here.  

 

To begin, I took the 3/64" thick transom and clamped it into position.....

 

transom1.jpg

Now this laser cut piece was cut a bit taller than needed.  This was done on purpose because there will no doubt be some variations.  It depends on where you placed those stern frame fillers.  The best way to judge the placement of the transom is not the outboard side.  You must examine the inboard side carefully.

 

transom.jpg

Note the lips around each stern window opening.  These will in all likelihood not be very consistent.  Thats OK.  That is why I designed it this way.  You will be able to push the windows into position and move them a bit so they look good from outboard.  Basically you will center them in the space.  That lip allows you to do that.   This is what you should be adjusting placement for.  When you have a good orientation where the lips around each stern window are good (examine the plans as this is shown) you will see how the transom is too high.   

 

But its not a problem because you can mark the true height with a pencil as I have done and sand the top of transom to fit your model before gluing it into position.  I hope that makes sense.  The top of the transom should be flush with your stern filler pieces.  Runn a pencil along the tops of your filler pieces while its clamped in the final position.   

 

Another thing to keep in mind is the quarter gallery window.  There will also be a lip around that.  Make sure it is consistent on the port and starboard sides.  You dont want one side bigger than the other after you glue it on.  Dont shift it more to one side than the other.

 

I like to glue the transom on first.  Many might find it easier to plank the upper counter first.  But because all the window openings are crucial, I thought it best to glue the transom in position first after determining the placement.  This will of course leave a nice consistent measurement for your upper counter as shown in that top photo.  Once the transom is glued on you can plank the upper counter.

 

transom3.jpg

I uses 3 strips rather than laser cut these.  Again this width will no doubt vary from model to model.....just a wee bit.  I used 7/32" x 3/64" strips to plank the upper counter.  You will need to bevel the edges against the transom and lower counter.  Also pre-bend these because although it is hard to see in the photos, there is a substantial curve to these.  Make sure you make these extra long so they extend a bit more beyond the side of the transom.  You can see that in the picture above.

 

Then, I took these two 3/32" thick laser cut pieces....

 

transom2.jpg

These are glued to the forward side of the transom where the quarter galleries are.  But its not that simple.  Once again they are slightly over-sized.  You must first bevel the side that fits against the hull planking.  It will need some careful beveling.  You also need to take enough material from that side so it also leaves a consistent lip around the window.  This is so we can push those window frames in the opening.  This will be tricky!!!  Try and sand enough away to give you a decent lip on both sides of this window opening.  Then sand the outsides to match the shape of your transom.  

 

transom4.jpg

Eventually the upper counter will be shaped like I show it above.  See the pencil line that shows the typical shape.  But before we do that, we need to double up the planking thickness on the upper counter (under the 3/32" piece we just added).  I used some scrap 1/16" thick strips.  It doesnt have to be fancy, this will all be covered up later.  But we need to make it thicker.

 

Then you can sand the sides of the upper counter to shape...

 

transom6.jpg

The sides have been sanded in the photo above.  Notice the added thickness.  The side of the counter was sanded flush with the transom on the top....but it angles narrower to give you the right shape along the bottom.

 

How will you know how wide to make the bottom of the counter?  It should be 7/16" away from the hull.  Measure before you sand!!! And draw a line from top to bottom so you have a reference line to follow when sanding the edge to shape.

 

Thats it for the transom for now.  Next I will start framing the quarter galleries.  Also forgot to mention that the two small round ports on the the top of the stern filler pieces, they can be enlarged to the size as laser cut in the transom.  I have yet to do this but maybe I will do it tomorrow.  

 

Any questions???

 

 

Oh and notice the gentle curve on the transom...it is quite evident now.  Things will be a bit messy while we build out the transom and quarter galleries.  But once everything is painted and cleaned up it will look lovely.

 

transom5.jpg

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Hi Chuck, Winnie is looking great!!

You were right about this thread helping me out with the Triton build as I would have been a bit stumped as to how to make the quarter galleries. 

From this you have probably gathered that I'm going to continue with Triton as I've already got a decent way into the build, but I seriously think Winnie will be a definite future project. 

Thanks for all the very useful posts.

Cheers 👍😀

That is after Chris's Speedy of course

Edited by Edwardkenway

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Chuck, the build is looking great. 
Chapter two of Winchelsea is a great read. I really don’t understand how you do it?

Do this type of model building and run your Company.

An off the wall question? Were did you get the long neck clamps that you use? I have tried to find 

them, but no luck! Help please!

 Tim  

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I actually git them at lowes or home depot.   But only online.  They were very cheep.  I bought about a dozen.

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Today I cut a test set of laser cut windows for the stern.  They fit perfectly.   If you remember on my smaller version, I used laserboard for these.  But on this 1/4" scale Winnie, I was able to cut them from .025 boxwood.  They are still very fragile but they work great.  Now the inside edges do have laser char on them as you might expect.  DO NOT try and sand this stuff off.  The frames are too fragile for that.  If you want to lighten them up on the edges use some weathering powder instead.  But be careful.  Anyway, these wont be used just yet but I am always making parts before I need them.  Thought I would show you guys what it looks like.  I tried to make sure they didnt look too heavy while still being not so fragile.  The appearance of scale is so important.  All of this laser cut stuff will be available in the chapter three installment.

 

Chuck

 

laserwindowtest.jpg

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