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HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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So Chuck: in reading the posts, the intent with the friezes is that a downloaded file will be provided and we hard copy it at our end? And if that is the case I would be interested in what would be recommended for paper (or cardstock?) as well as adhesive. Reading these posts are a real incentive for me as I am making a push to get my Agamemnon done before I start the Winnie. At this point Im nearly done my ratlines and stays. Getting close to the final stretch. 

 

Keep this discussion going. Its been great reading! 

 

Mike Draper

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I have used regular copy paper in the past.  It works fine.  But I am toying around with the idea of experimenting with acid free tissue paper.  Its the same stuff that I use for flags.  In theory it will be easier to hide the cut edges and fold it in place.  Then trim off the excess.  But that is just a theory.  I will try it out tonight.  This test was just done with plain old copy paper.  You can see how the edge turns white after cutting.  I usually use a soft pastel pencil to color this edge....but I am thinking this wont be needed with the tissue paper.

 

qgallframing6.jpg

 

Chuck

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Chuck: Do keep us posted on your success with the use of acid free tissue paper. Also, any thoughts on what adhesive to use? I always find that a bit of a challenge in getting a adhesive that provides a smooth adhesion. 

 

Mike Draper

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Here is what the frieze with the name looks like tested on the model.  Its a little crooked but this is just a test...its not glued on yet.   I think this one is the winner.  Thank you David for helping me with the font. It looks very good and much better than my attempts.

 

friezetest3.jpg

friezetest4.jpg

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Just a small update...I have put the seats in the galleries.  This means I can start closing them up next.  The seats are made of two laser cut pieces that are 1/32" thick.   The front panel and the top.   You still need to bevel and tweak the edges for the best fit.

 

seatqgall.jpg

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Your work is so clean and exact.  I keep finding my self pulled back into this log.  This will be a beautiful ship.   I am so tempted to jump in.  I only hesitate due to the fact I have two builds started and two other kits collecting dust and my life causes me to drift in and out of model ship building like the tide.  

 

What really is appealing to me is the way you are doing this.  I admire the work of Masters like you and others on this forum.  When I look at some of the build logs on MSW I often think, I wish I could build a ship with that level of craftsmanship.  The closer I look at this log the more I believe you are really paving a way for others to learn and bring their skills to the next level.   Not only is the kit superb and provides a solid foundation but your log and teaching style provides the guidance a novices like myself would need.  I know form the many enjoyable hours I have spent reading a number of your build logs over the years that is not an accident but by design.  

 

My hats off to you Sir!

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Personally, I think it would be awesome for Chuck's figure to be seated on the seats of ease, holding a miniature set of plans. Imagine future historians peering through the lights and trying to make sense of that one!

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9 hours ago, Blue Pilot said:

Your work is so clean and exact.  I keep finding my self pulled back into this log.  This will be a beautiful ship.   I am so tempted to jump in.  I only hesitate due to the fact I have two builds started and two other kits collecting dust and my life causes me to drift in and out of model ship building like the tide.  

 

Hi Mark,

Like you, I have a couple of unfinished builds but decided to take the plunge anyway.  And, like you, I tend to drift in and out of model ships but I wanted to try my luck at scratch building and figured this would be a good start.  I have to admit, for only $15 it's not a huge loss if I decide that I'm over my head or this is too advanced for me.  For any build where I can get Chuck's build log and advise, I would have to say it's more than worth the money.

 

I would love to buy Chuck's kits for this build but it wouldn't be a scratch build.  I'm going to try to muddle through with the few tools I do have. I may have to tap out and place an order or two with Syren but for now I'll go it alone.

 

Take the plunge. There is nothing (or at least very little) to lose.

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To close up the Qgalleries, I  started by adding the top.  This is laser cut (1/16" thick)  It is important to create the same angle as the bottom.  This was marked with the paper template earlier.  You can see my tick marks in pencil.  Getting this angle correct is crucial just like the bottom of the Qgalleries.  Otherwise your windows wont fit well.  The aft edge needs to be beveled to sit flush against the transom.

 

qgall1.jpg

Next we need to put in the uprights between each window.  These are two layers of 3/64" thick laser cut strips.  One layer is slightly wider than the top layer.  This forms a rabbet on both sides when glued together as shown below.  You will need four of these on each side.  Clean the laser char off each layer before you glue them together.

 

qgall2.jpg

You should also paint the top face of these blue before you start shaping them.  Yes you will need to touch these up later but this helps.  I am using cerulean blue acrylic paint.  It is a pretty good match to the friezes.  You can see these four pieces glued into position below.  One note.....the two outside pieces dont have a rabbet on the outside edges.  They were sanded away.  The rabbet is used to catch the windows when they are inserted later.  In fact, how do you know where these should go so they are spaced the proper distance apart.  Use the laser cut windows as a guide.  I started by gluing the two outside pieces on first.  Then I positioned a window temporarily so I knew where the next one went.  Do this carefully so all your windows fit.  Its good to do a dry fit first.  Use rubber cement to temporary hold the uprights in position.  

 

qgall3.jpg

 

Another important note....the forward upright has a very drastic bevel on its forward edge so it fits snug against the planking.  I also left each upright a bit longer and once glued in place, I sanded them flush with the top.  It should look like this when you are done...but the windows are NOT glued in at this point.  Dont do that yet....

 

You will also notice that these uprights stand proud of the transom edge....that is OK and by design.  It should stand proud by one layer or 3/64" along the transom.

 

qgall4.jpg

Then we had to insert the top above each window.  There are two layer remember?  But you seriously only need to put the outside layer on.  Its OK to leave a gap because the roof (with its shingles) will cover those gaps.  I used 7/32" wide x 3/64" thick strips.  This is wider than you will need.  But after getting the angles correct and they are glued in position, you can sand the tops down flush like the uprights.

 

qgall5.jpg

Lastly....we need to add the fancy molding along the top edge of the Qgallery.  It is scraped like the others and is also 1/8" wide and 3/64" thick.

You will need to bend this to get it to lay against the surface properly.  I also had to file out the aft edge of the molding so the figure would fit.  I used a sharp miniature chisel actually after the molding was glued into position.  I think you can see what I did so the shoulder of the figure would fit.

 

qgall7.jpg

qgall6.jpg

To finish it up I will have to add the fancy fluted columns in between the windows next...but I ran out of steam and will do that during the week. 😊

 

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Looks beautiful Chuck, you Sir are a true craftsman. Wish I had a tenth of your talent.

 

Will the frieze and these two figures be available when this chapter is issued?

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I hope so.  I actually have three resin sets of figures right now.  Jack is almost ready with his so you can order them.  The friezes will be available to download.  

 

But you guys still have a long way to go!!!! Theres a lot planking ahead you guys.   Dont rush through that....this stuff will be ready when you are ready.  😃

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15 hours ago, Chuck said:

To close up the Qgalleries, I  started by adding the top.  This is laser cut (1/16" thick)  It is important to create the same angle as the bottom.  This was marked with the paper template earlier.  You can see my tick marks in pencil.  Getting this angle correct is crucial just like the bottom of the Qgalleries.  Otherwise your windows wont fit well.  The aft edge needs to be beveled to sit flush against the transom.

 

qgall1.jpg

Next we need to put in the uprights between each window.  These are two layers of 3/64" thick laser cut strips.  One layer is slightly wider than the top layer.  This forms a rabbet on both sides when glued together as shown below.  You will need four of these on each side.  Clean the laser char off each layer before you glue them together.

 

qgall2.jpg

You should also paint the top face of these blue before you start shaping them.  Yes you will need to touch these up later but this helps.  I am using cerulean blue acrylic paint.  It is a pretty good match to the friezes.  You can see these four pieces glued into position below.  One note.....the two outside pieces dont have a rabbet on the outside edges.  They were sanded away.  The rabbet is used to catch the windows when they are inserted later.  In fact, how do you know where these should go so they are spaced the proper distance apart.  Use the laser cut windows as a guide.  I started by gluing the two outside pieces on first.  Then I positioned a window temporarily so I knew where the next one went.  Do this carefully so all your windows fit.  Its good to do a dry fit first.  Use rubber cement to temporary hold the uprights in position.  

 

qgall3.jpg

 

Another important note....the forward upright has a very drastic bevel on its forward edge so it fits snug against the planking.  I also left each upright a bit longer and once glued in place, I sanded them flush with the top.  It should look like this when you are done...but the windows are NOT glued in at this point.  Dont do that yet....

 

You will also notice that these uprights stand proud of the transom edge....that is OK and by design.  It should stand proud by one layer or 3/64" along the transom.

 

qgall4.jpg

Then we had to insert the top above each window.  There are two layer remember?  But you seriously only need to put the outside layer on.  Its OK to leave a gap because the roof (with its shingles) will cover those gaps.  I used 7/32" wide x 3/64" thick strips.  This is wider than you will need.  But after getting the angles correct and they are glued in position, you can sand the tops down flush like the uprights.

 

qgall5.jpg

Lastly....we need to add the fancy molding along the top edge of the Qgallery.  It is scraped like the others and is also 1/8" wide and 3/64" thick.

You will need to bend this to get it to lay against the surface properly.  I also had to file out the aft edge of the molding so the figure would fit.  I used a sharp miniature chisel actually after the molding was glued into position.  I think you can see what I did so the shoulder of the figure would fit.

 

qgall7.jpg

qgall6.jpg

To finish it up I will have to add the fancy fluted columns in between the windows next...but I ran out of steam and will do that during the week. 😊

 

beauteful... hats off☺

 

svein erik

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Thank You!!!

 

I added the columns to the QGalleries.  The top and bottom of the columns were done using a scraped strip of boxwood.  Basically you scrape the strip like you would make a molding.  Then cut off tiny pieces that become the top and bottom of each column.  You still must file the sape on each side to finish it off.  This was a 3/32" x 3/64" boxwood strip.

 

Then the fluted column was added between these two pieces to complete each column.  These are laser cut from .025" thick boxwood.  They have laser etched flutes.  

 

Note how just a small strip of blue remains on each side of the columns.  I will start working on the other side so now so I complete the galleries at the same time.  Then I will put the shingled roof on each qgallery.

 

colums.jpg

colums1.jpg

colums2.jpg

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Chuck, you're doing a great job on the QGalleries. Very methodical and neatly done. Did you manage to straighten out the frieze with the name? How is the tissue paper working out?

 

Mike

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