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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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On 11/30/2019 at 4:16 PM, Chuck said:

Just a small update...I have put the seats in the galleries.  This means I can start closing them up next.  The seats are made of two laser cut pieces that are 1/32" thick.   The front panel and the top.   You still need to bevel and tweak the edges for the best fit.

 

seatqgall.jpg

Hi Chuck,

 

Would there be an outlet hole in the quarter gallery's floor, below the seat's hole?  It doesn't look like there would be anywhere for such a hole to go, what with the carved bit supporting the quarter gallery's floor from underneath.

Or does the seat in fact go over a chamber pot?  If so, I'm guessing that either the seat or the kick panel would have to hinge to allow removal of said article.  Or possibly the seat could just be loose, fitting snugly in the nook formed by the two walls and the kick panel.  Then it could simply be lifted off for maintenance access to the enclosure.

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Hello, I would like to build it on a 1/35 scale, what should I do to print them in my work, I put it in 125%? I hope you can help me. Thank you very much, I'm sorry if it was not the thread to ask.

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Math isnt my thing....I will leave it to one of the other guys to give you that percentage!!!  :blink:  Keep in mind none of the stuff will fit that is offered as a laser cut package and also the carvings.  You will need to build it all at that scale.

 

Chuck

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Thank you for answering Mr. Passaro, yes, I want to build everything to scale, that's why I continue your work very carefully, however I need to know the percentage to print it at 1/35

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I've noticed a lot of art prints at exhibitions now have clear acrylic coatings "painted" on, so the piece looks like it was painted rather than printed.  Would that add another layer of authenticity to the friezes, if the clear acrylic was painted over the shapes with a very small, fine brush?

 

Alan

 

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If the ink is water-soluble (and most printer ink is!), the water content in acrylics will make things run. Not good.

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Yes I agree, I dont think that would work or even look good.  I just spray it with some fixative and it looks good to me.  If you wanted to, you could always use it as a paint by numbers sort of thing and just paint on top of the printed frieze.  But I think the printout looks better than anything I have seen short of just painting it from scratch.

 

I did finish the roof today...

 

The roof is laser cut and 1/4" thick.  It has a laser etched reference line to show you where to bevel it to the "sloped" shape needed.

qgallroof.jpg

Then I used some laser cut shingles and added them to the roof.   Three rows as is typical.  After each row starting with the bottom, I sanded the shingles very thin....paper thin almost.  The tops were sanded flush with the roof to accept the next row.  Then I repeated it....until completed.  There are marks on each shingle to help you position the second and third rows.

qgallroof1.jpg

Then the roof and tiles was painted black.  But the tiles are more of a dark slate gray.  So I weathered them a bit so it wasnt a stark black.  Then I added a thin molding on top as you can see.  This is also laser cut but it also needs to be sanded thinner.  1/32" is too thick.  I sanded it to about 1/64" thick.

 

qgallroof2.jpg

qgallroof3.jpg

 

At this stage I still havent glued the shingled roof in position.  So resist the urge.  Before finishing up this quarter gallery I want to now start on the one on the port side.  Once that is completed up to this stage I will finish the both of them.  The fancy rail along the roof still needs to be added.  But that is better done after the friezes are glued to the sides of the hull.  So I have to finish those up first.  And finally some inspiration and reference which you can compare to my interpretation.  Although I used the draft to correct any differences with the contemporary model.

 

qgfriezes.jpg

qgallroof5.jpg

 

 

Chuck

 

 

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On 11/29/2019 at 6:59 PM, Jim Rogers said:

You gonna lose the period?

 

 

On 11/29/2019 at 7:03 PM, Chuck said:

Why would i do that?  They used them.  

 

I too thought the period looked a little odd. However I trust Chuck's knowledge. Then yesterday I was looking at some of the available RMG drawings and saw this:

image.png.da9b3678228a78c6433e3f9215de9c99.png

So I still think it looks weird but it's correct.

 

Richard

 

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Chuck, your Quartergallery is very impressive. As the gunports are painted red, and the painted freezes are added as well, my question is: will the captains cabin from inside be painted in any kind of color, white for example? That would mean, that the inside of the quarter gallery could be painted white, or light grey, or even red as well. My other Question is: are you going to install toilets in both quarter-galleries? That would be a bit funny for just one person. But on the other Hand, it might make sense, regarding luv and lee. 

Matthias

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The model of HMS Amzon, you mentioned above in your post of July 4th, has a white (or light grey) painted great cabin and even a white painted ceiling in that cabin.

Edited by Beckmann

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You could paint the interior but i rather like just leaving it natural wood.  The interior on the contemporary model is just left natural although the paneled walls that sep the cabins are painted off white.

 

Yes i added facilities in both galleries.

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The reason why I havent just completed the quarter gallery is simple.  I want to make a nice clean edge between the quarter gallery roof, rail and the painted frieze.  This means the frieze along the hull needs to go on first.  I am still testing and tweaking that.  But first...the 3/32" wide fancy molding must be scraped and glued on the hull.  This will be our guide for the friezes.  I am just talking about the middle molding.  Once glued in position, you will be able to sit the frieze on top of it as shown.  The thinner frieze can be butt against it along the bottom as well.

 

Then to finish it off the you will be able to use the friezes as a guide to place the remaining molding in position.  This is the next step for me.  Once this is completed I will then get back to finishing the fancy rail on the roof of the quarter gallery.

 

Once this is done on both sides of the hull, I will then start finishing the stern transom with all of the carvings and columns.  When that is all done it will complete chapter three.  But there is a lot of work involved with all this stuff so it will take several weeks at least.  I have stop work this weekend though because I am leaving for New Orleans yet again!!!  Second attempt at some fun and relaxation.  Here is a look at the testing so far!!!  The friezes are not glued on yet as I am still tweaking them.  They are just resting on the molding.

 

 

hullfrieze2.jpg

hullfrieze3.jpg

hullfrieze4.jpg

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Just one note as while working on the friezes I have several photos of Minerva out for inspiration.  Its one of the reason I have decided to go with a lighter toned frieze.  The Cedar is light and anything darker would be too much.   But I wanted to point out a few things.  

 

Note the unpainted roof shingles of the quarter galleries....

 

Note the painted interior of the qgalleries...I dont like that its a weird color.  

 

But I will be making a second roof as a test with the top painted the same blue as the frieze while leaving the shingles natural.    There are plenty of choices out there and looking at the way contemporary builders did this is great for inspiration.  The Minerva model in the Naval Academy is  much more refined and built with more expertise than the Winnie contemporary model.  The Winnie model is a bit crude in its details by comparison.  So examining both makes for good study!!  

 

Also note how you can see that the contemporary builder painted his frieze on paper and glued it on the model.  There is a bit of lifting in one of the images I posted.

 

gunportmolding.jpgMinerva model # 55 036.jpgModel No. 55 QDeck Aft Portion of  QGal-1.jpg

 

 

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Another Option for the friezes would be to paint the blueish background, print the friezes as decals (or let them print) without the blueish background and add these decals over the painted background. Good printed decals will be look like painted.

 

cheers

 

Dirk

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I like your version of the friezes and quarter galleries better than the model of the Minerva.  Your design work and craftsmanship constantly amazes me.

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Here's another view of that area. Grant Walker gave me a CD of hi-res photos of the model. Note the crazy lime green color of the interior. I also note the molding ends are beautifully shaped to reflect the profile. I wonder if they were left short intentionally or an upper carving might have been lost?

 

I've seen contemporary models with the blue frieze, slate gray shingles, white fluted columns and red windows (matching the port linings). It's a striking combination! So many choices...213754661_Minervamodel55058.thumb.jpg.302f748beb775d97b1f7880eba83ea7c.jpg

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The Photo of Minerva is excellent. Would you mind putting some more photos from that CD into the gallery of contemporary models?

Edited by Beckmann

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Minerva is one of my favorite models.  It always serves to inspire me.  Here is my version (a little hesitant to place my wok against such a masterful contemporary model) of the shingled roof left natural.  I kind of prefer the natural look.  But I will sleep on it a bit.  What do you guys think.  I think the dark roof is too "in your face".  But I could be wrong.  Note how thin the shingles are sanded after each row is completed.  These are boxwood shingles.

 

natural roof.jpg

natural roof1.jpg

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I like the natural look.  Might the shingles be a use for laser board?  Being thinner to start the might not need sanding.

Kurt

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But then they would need to be painted.  Most folks find that hard to do neatly and with a decent color.   Everybody can sand!!!!!   You cant beat the look of natural wood vs. painting whenever possible in my opinion.  I would love to hear some more opinions on this...:blink:

 

Chuck

 

 

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I like the natural look and the subdued colors.  The darker colors provide too much contrast with the lighter wood of the hull, and draw attention away from the model as a whole.

 

On the contemporary models with darker wood tones, it is not as much of a distraction..

Edited by Gregory

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I really like how Minerva is finished, I’ve seen the model up close many times and it’s very attractive. Dubz, I like the idea of painting the blue and then printing a decal set and maybe finish over the whole thing with a satin polyurethane to blend it all together.

JJ

Edited by scrubbyj427
Misspelling

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