Jump to content
Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

Recommended Posts

A small update.....the starboard side is almost complete (for chapter three anyway).  I just want to add that fancy rail on the top of the qgallery.  But today I finished the friezes and molding on this side.   

 

friezefinalmolding5.jpg

 

Remember, the middle molding goes on first.  It is a scraped 3/32" wide molding.  It establishes the proper sheer run.  Then you can add the friezes above and below that molding strip.   You should do this without the qgallery roof glued into position.  It is done this way so the roof can cover the friezes (be glued on top of it) and you will get a nice clean edge.   This way you want have to cut the frieze around the roof and shingles.

 

friezefinalmolding4.jpg

The lower molding is also scraped in the traditional way.  It is also 3/32" wide.  It has a different profile than the middle molding.  Check out the images of the contemporary model in the gallery before you make your scraper for the molding.  You can cut the short lengths that need to be added between each port.  In addition,  you will need to cut the frieze around each port.  I found this easier to do after the frieze was glued on.  Use a very very sharp xacto blade.  Go slow!!!  Then finally, locate the fixed blocks which are now covered by your frieze.  To do this, poke a drill bit through the sheave holes from the inboard side to puncture the frieze.  Then carefully cut the frieze away to reveal the sheave slots.  I ran a sharp pencil in the sheave slot to clean it up and make it neat.  It also darkens the sheave.

 

Then glue the top frieze into position.  Try and locate the seams between each segment over a busy part of the design.  This will help hide it.  You would be very hard pressed to find it on my model.  The frieze will not go all the way to the sheer.  It will be about 1/16 - 3/64" below the shear.  This is to accommodate the top run of fancy molding.  

 

This molding is not scraped.  It is laser etched and cut for you from boxwood.  I did this so I could also match it to the scrolls (volutes) along the waist.  I think it looks pretty good and mixing traditional scraped molding with a laser cut one is a good approach.   Much better than using a laser cut molding for every occurrence.

 

friezefinalmolding2.jpg

Be very careful with the scrolls when you sand them....they are fragile at only 1/32" thick.  The first thing you should do is lightly sand the top surface with some 320 grit sandpaper.   Then remove them from the sheet.   Use a light touch and then remove the laser char from the edges.  As you do so, remember to support the scroll between two fingers so it doesnt break along the grain.  Again use a light touch.  Dont try and clean the char in the inner edges of the swirled scroll.   It will break.  To finish them up, round off the top and bottom edges.  The same can be done with the lengths of laser cut molding so they match the scrolls and can be glued together so you cant see the seams between them.

 

friezefinalmolding6.jpg

 

Dont try and scrape the char from the laser etched grooves.  It just wont work and if you just leave it as is t will look great.  This is what I did with mine.

 

friezefinalmolding.jpg

When its all done...this is how it should look at the bow.  Take note of where the molding ends.  Once I finish the other side, I will paint the bollard timbers black.  You could do this ahead of time as well.  Probably easier that way.  Everything above the bottom molding will be painted black.  You cant really tell the difference between the laser cut and etched molding and the scraped molding in that close up!!  Its just a little darker where the char sits in the grooves.

friezefinalmolding1.jpg

Lastly...at the stern, notice on the contemporary model that the top molding does not extend to the transom. The blue of the frieze extends right up to the shear.  The black cap which we will add later will sit on top of the shear.   The molding ends at the rail on the qgallery roof.  Which I will add next.

 

 

DSCF5530.JPG

 

ANY questions or comments???  I dont think I forgot to mention anything.....remember....a light touch when sanding those scrolls....really.

 

And I still havent decided on the roof color for the quarter galleries....but I have to decide so I can add that rail.  By the way, I havent even started on the port side yet.  So lots to do before I start working on the stern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also want to thank Simon Stephens at the National Maritime Museum for getting me these great photos of the contemporary model.  He is the curator of ship models there.  I wouldnt have been able to recreate the friezes like this without his help.   Thanks Simon!!!  😊

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are probably right.  I have til the weekend to decide as i wont have time till then to finish up the qgallery rail. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Chuck, I've just caught up with your progress and she is looking outstanding.

I throw my vote to the painted group. I'll be fun to see the various approaches everyone takes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn, Chuck, those volute scrolls are as nice as any I've seen on contemporary models. I think you've got this laser printing thing down pat! I wonder if you'll be able to do complex moldings like the main rail when you get to the bow. It's difficult even with scrapers.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/29/2019 at 3:12 AM, Chuck said:

Here is a photo of the frieze with the name

 

friezetest2.jpg

 

Hello Chuck,

I personally prefer the colours, you used above.

Is it possible to get the freeze with this green-blue background? I am still thinking about the old masters gel stain. It would match better, using the darker Colours.

Thanks 

Matthias

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the color....it might just print differently on everyones printer.  Also my the photos may look different of my model because of my camera settings.   But no I cant change it because each piece is frieze is made up of several images strung together which would take hours and hours to redo and change....either in color or size.  So everyone will have to import them into a program if they want to change it.   I wont have the time or desire to custom alter the friezes for everyone.  What you see took about 100 hours to create over many weeks.

 

Chuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No but after printing....spraying and such....and taking photos it will look different than in real life.   But you can always import it and alter the saturation and contrast settings in photoshop or something.

 

friezeinal1.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chuck, everything looks great. The side frieze design is the best that I have seen.

 The quarter galleries are works of art them selves. Still lean toward the natural roof, but like the slate 

color. 
Side note, I ordered the Boxwood set form Jack three days ago and they are delivering tomorrow.

That is unbelievable.

Hope you have a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.  Please get some Rest!

Tim

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mean the friezes they are in sections on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets.

 

thanks Tim,  i should also have have the resin sets up on my site today.  So watch for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Tim Murphy said:

Side note, I ordered the Boxwood set form Jack three days ago and they are delivering tomorrow.

Yes, I sent the first six sets to the agent yesterday. The agent has received them this morning and sent them to the United States from DHL this afternoon. It happens that the first six members are all in U.S.A. I have sent the second batch to the agent this afternoon. Tomorrow, the agent will send the second batch to DHL for sending out. merry Christmas to every one in advance!

 

Jack

Edited by hjx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those building in Cherry or pear.....

 

Here is what they will look like with a coat of OLD MASTERS fruitwood gel stain.  

 

I STRONGLY recommend that whether you are building in Yellow Cedar, Cherry or pear, that you apply a coat of this gel stain with a brush.  Leave it sit for a minute or two.  Then buff it off with another soft but clean brush or soft lint free cloth.   It really does the trick and creates the finish you want.  Below shown against some scrap Pear I had and left on a bit longer to get less contrast.

 

pear.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Resin sets are now up on my site for sale.  I am also selling the figureheads stand alone.  Keep in mind the Christmas holiday so I may not be able to ship until after Xmas now.   The admiral is giving me too many Santa Duties.

 

Chuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking back on your discussion of finishes on yellow cedar and I asked my cousin who still fishes out of Sitka about its use as planking on the wooden Salmon Trollers there. Yellow cedar isn't used that much for planking as it doesn't hold finishes well. It has a natural oil in it that rejects most finishes as you found out. If left to itself the cedar will naturally darken as I found out when a retailer of one of my carved paddles found out when he put a sticker on one. When removed by the customerer a lighter colored spot he shape of the sticker was left and the sale was rejected. It sure it pretty as model planking though. Your work is superb BTW. Another interesting thing about cedar is that its bark can be stripped in the spring of the year and is cleaned and cut into long flexible strips that  is then woven into durable baskets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes indeed.  Luckily our models dont see the outside and any water.  The cedar really works well and has a great color that is so complimentary with the use of boxwood.

 

In fact, to point that out, I finished the qgallery on the starboard side.  For the most part, all of the wood that makes up what you see on the qqallery is boxwood.  It blends really well with the cedar.  You get the benefit of the cheaper price so you can use it for planking and frames and other big stuff.  Then like done here you can switch to the ever more expensive boxwood for the details and other fittings.  In fact, most of the deck fittings and molding will all be done in boxwood.  

 

The qgallery roof rail is all laser cut from boxwood.  You basically have to evenly space the four uprights which are at an angle leaning aft.  There is a nice etched detail on each of them.  These are super super tiny at only 1/16" wide give or take and 1/8" tall.  Then the top rail is added.  This is laser cut with an etched detail along the bottom to give it some depth.  I sanded the laser char and rounded off the edges a bit.  Then I glued it on top of the four uprights.  Yes it a bit longer so you van adjust it to fit your model.

 

Lastly, the three laser cut fancy "flowers" for lack of a better description were glued into the space provided for them.  These are fragile.  Only 1/64" thick and again soooo tiny.  Dont even bother trying to remove the laser char from the edges.  They will break.  Just glue them in position.  That is what I did.

 

This completes all the work for the starboard side as described in chapter 3.  Now to repeat this on the port side!!!

 

Left natural and unpainted...just so you can see it.  Its too bright for my tastes.  I am going with the painted version.

 

qgallrail.jpg

 

The painted version....weathered to look like a slate color....I may still lighten it up a bit.

 

qgallrail1.jpg

qgallrail2.jpg

 

Overall the galleries came out well.  But these are tricky with so many complex angles.  I definitely recommend buying the laser cut pieces for these even if you are trying to build most everything from scratch.  The windows and glazing and the columns with laser etched flutes etc.  All of the laser cut and etched scrolls will be included too.  The angles are all worked out for you and this will make building the qgalleries so much easier.  These parts will be mostly boxwood for the cedar version and cherry for those building it in pear or some other darker wood.  

 

Oh and I added a scrap piece of painted strip to show you guys what the cap rail will eventually look like.   This will be painted black and glued on top of the sheer much later in the  project.  After we finish planking inboard.  Much later...but it shows how nice it will be finished off.

 

Any questions or comments??? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Chuck, 

You are doing incredible job, what ever you do. I would love to start with your Cheerful project (and then turn to this gem) but how is the shipping to europe pleasee? 

 

Thanks

Petr 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its what you would expect.  It costs a lot.  Its different depending on what you buy.  The easiest way to find out is to put stuff in your cart in my online store and then it will calculate it.  You will find the exact price that way before you check out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...