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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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Well, I’m sure Jack’s will look better, however, considering the originals were carved by hand (not machine) 250 years ago with crude instruments.....I’m still very impressed. Very beautiful. 

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A little crude, perhaps. However, I find it is part of the charm of these contemporary models. Neptune's face reminds me of Davy Jones in Pirates of the Caribbean!

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Hey Chuck and all the other builders of this model, all of you are doing an amazing job - I have enjoyed following this forum.

 

I don't know if I am missing something in looking at the pictures and reading the posts.  If I remember correctly, the wale lines of the ship stuck out farthest (thickest part of the entire hull). I can't tell from the many pictures looked at on this forum, it honestly looks like all planks are the same thickness and some painted or stained black. 

 

Brian :)

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Hello Chuck. On December 30, you indicated that Elmers wood filler had the exact same color as yellow cedar. I need it to finalize the hull of the Medway Longboat (some micro small gaps to fill between the keel and the planks at the bow...). As this product is not available in my country, I will buy it via Amazon. But I will be sure to buy the good product...

Elmers_wood_filler.jpg.27c8dd48fee8cee503e18861741836ac.jpg

It is found in several shades : natural, golden oak,... Can you give me the right reference (or put a picture of the box) ?

Thank You in advance and all my admiration for the wonderful job on the Winchelsea ! 😍

Happy New Year !

 

    

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The natural in the tub on the upper right.

 

and yes the wales and black strake are thicker.  But not the crazy pronounced amount that you usually see with kits.  Its not as pronounced.   

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Chuck, Thank You for the quick answer. I will order it.

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Chuck.  I like this link but I am really stuck.  Pretty much at Step 1.  I'd be much obliged if you'd help me get to step two.

 

http://modelshipworldforum.com/resources/Framing_and_Planking/Lining Off your hull for planking.pdf

 

I cut my tic strips.  Then cut one exactly the length of my largest bulkhead, numbered it and the bulkhead, then made a tic mark (starting from the top) every 6mm (width of my planks).  Then I transferred the tic marks to the bulk head.  This is where I'm stuck.  What do I do for the other bulkheads?  Do I divide each bulkhead distance by the original number of planks (25)?  Do I need to have all my tic marks on all the bulkheads prior to attaching my art tape?

 

 

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Yes you measure that distance of each tick strip and then divide by 25.....

 

BUT its better to divide the hull into belts because at the stern the planks are narrower into the tuck of the counter than against the stern post.   You should line off the hull into belts first......at least separating the hull into two belts.  Those that terminate against the counter or those that terminate along the stern post.   It may not be exactly half the strakes either.   This is not pure math and there is plenty of artistic considerations.  Otherwise the run of your planks will be very odd and the widths will be even weirder.   

 

What ship are you building?   That would certainly help the discussion.

 

Chuck

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Chuck, could you clarify for me the width of the bulkheads.

I am at the stage where the bow bulkheads need thinning down.  In chapter one you mention thinning the bow bulkheads down to 1/8" wide.  Later in chapter two the thickness is given as 3/16" for the quarter deck.

I wondered if I am reading this correctly or just being a dumbell :wacko:

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In chapter one there is no planking....hence 1/8" at the bow.   Once you plank up to the sheer in chapter two, you add the fairing cap which is 3/16" wide because it now has the planking on outboard hull.   

 

Chuck

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Thanks Chuck,  had the feeling I was missing something.

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Hi Chuck,

 

Just signed on and ordered Chapters 1, 2, frames. I swore I would not start another built up ship model but with your effort in developing the kit, I will fully enjoy the build.

 

Thanks,

 

Iran

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Work on the transom details has begun.  The first thing to tackle was the fancy molding around the top of the transom.  Its a very typical shape which makes scraping them a bit difficult.  I remember doing that on the 1:64 version of the Winnie.  So since I was happy with the results of the laser cut molding on the sides of the hull, I decided to try and make these with the laser cutter also.  Its a simpler profile but it meant laser etching the bottom half of each molding segment.  

 

In the photo below, you can see the molding that is finished.  I sanded off the laser char with some 320 grit sandpaper.  I also had to sand the char from the bottom half by folding small pieces of sandpaper and cutting a straight sharp edge on it.  This allowed me to clean up the face of the etched area.  You will never get it all off.  Dont worry about that.  Get most of it clean and what remains will give a good effect when you apply some poly.  You can also see a few pieces I havent sanded yet.

transommolding.jpg

In the next photo you can see I have added the molding.  Try and get some tight joints between each segment.  But before I glued them into position, I had some painting and prep work to do.  

 

First - you must paint the top of the transom black along with the stern frame extensions.  The outside of the transom top edge (port and starboard) is left unpainted as shown.

 

Second - paint the insides of the two round ports red.

 

Third- You can paint the upper transom blue.  Cerulean blue to be exact.  Paint it above the cove and windows for now so after adding the molding you get a nice clean edge.

 

Now I know some of you hate the thought of painting.  It will also be hard to match the blue of the friezes exactly.  So I also provided a paper backing to match the friezes.  Personally I would prefer to paint this area but I did use the paper version.  Just leave a small gap all around the perimeter so you can glue the molding and coves on and still get a clean edge.  You can see in the photo the paper version and the nice clean edge you get when the molding is glued on.  If you have to touch up the paint on the round ports just be careful.  When you cut the paper around the ports you will probably mar the inside of the ports a bit.  But no worries as the wreaths will cover any paint mishaps.  Just as mine did as you can see.

 

transommolding1.jpg

When adding the molding I started with

 

First - the two segments port and starboard with no etched detail.   

 

Then I added the center piece on the top of the transom and worked my way out towards the sides.  This is important because of the way the etched molding intersects with the non-etched pieces along the sides.  Hope that makes sense.

 

Then I needed to make the cove which is what the carvings sit on.  It is a laser cut piece that still needs a bit of carving work.   See below.  I will explain the steps.

 

Transomcove.jpg

The photo above shows the cove in stages.  The top shows the untouched example straight off the laser cutter.  Notice the laser etched line to indicate the molding along the top.  There are also some handles on either side which will eventually be removed.  In addition, along the bottom it is notched out so you can add a strip of wood which will become the moldong along the bottom of the cove when you are done shaping it.

 

The first step is to take a chisel or in my case a sharp #11 blade and bevel the inside up to the etched line.  Do this slowly.  You are basically creating a straight bevel under what will be the molding along the top.  It should thin down to about 1/32" thick along the bottom if not even thinner.

 

Step two is to use some 320 grit sandpaper or even a curved chisel to sand the inside round or concave.  The cove is only 5/64" thick so it wont be to rounded and it wont take that long.  Just try and maintain a consistent molding along the top.  Try and define that molding pretty good across the top. The bottom image in the photo above shows the cove shaped.  Its somewhat concave. I cleaned it up with some fine sandpaper so I could paint it red next.  The trick is to try and define the top molding and make it slightly concave.

 

Then I painted the inside carefully.  I tried to leave a consistent width molding along the top.   It worked out pretty good actually.  By the way this is cedar so its soft and sands and carves like butter.

 

To finish it up....you need to add the 3/64 x 3/64 strip of cedar along the bottom edge.  Glue it on good.  But this molding is thick......height-wise.  So I sanded it to around 1/32" thick so it wouldnt appear too heavy on the model.  Then cut off the two handles on each end and sand them clean as indicated by the etched lines.  The photo below shows the carvings glued on top in the center.

transomcove1.jpg

A few additional notes on the cove which is actually a very complex piece!!!  The top edge must be beveled.   If you glued this on now the top edge would be sloped downward in the wrong direction.  The top edge actually needs to follow the slope of the deck believe it or not.  So you must sand an angle or bevel it down towards the back.   This gets complex as the curve of the cove means that bevel is not consistent as you work your way towards the sides.  But do the best you can with this so your carvings will sit properly on top of it.

 

In that same photo below, you can see that I have glued the cove into position.   But before I did, I also glued the wreaths and center medallion in position.  This helped me position the cove properly almost right up against them.  

 

Then I continued by sanding and adding the smaller cove on the false lights and the small lengths that connect them.  These three pieces are also laser cut.  They are thicker than you need so you can really sand off the char and get them clean.  But make sure they are the same thickness as the molding along the top of the center cove when you are done.  They need to look like one continues even thickness molding across the transom.  Hope that makes sense.  They are also not as deep as the center cove.  I only finished one side so far.

transomcove2.jpg

With those pieces completed, you can add the other carvings.  This may sound easy enough but there is some prep work to do.  The reclining figure for example.  Note how the hand and clothing hangs over the front of the cove.  To do this, you must file a slot or notch on the back side of the carving.  Be careful.....these are small and delicate.

 

In addition,  note how the head intersects with the molding.  Rather than file the back of his head, I cut away the molding instead.  This takes careful planning.  You must do this in order to have the figure sit properly otherwise it wont fit.

 

Finally, Jack did a fantastic job on these carvings as you can see.  But because CNC machining is a violent process,  some f the items were left thicker than needed so they wouldnt break.  This is true of the castings as well.   So you should thin down the trident so the handle is rounded and delicate.  I probably should have gone more delicate.   You may also want to round off the legs and other areas so they arent so flat.  I am talking about the back edges.  Look at the arms and legs.   This thins them a bit and also creates an undercut of sorts to help the illusion of a fully rounded carving.

 

 

transomcarvings4.jpg

transomcarvings1.jpg

This photo really shows how the hand and clothes look as though they are draping over the cove.   You can see how I filed a notch in the back so it would look like this.

transomcarvings2.jpg

 

I am sure I left out a lot of details!!!!  But feel free to ask me any questions.  I think it looks pretty good at this point.  Jack really did a masterful job on the carvings.   These are the resin versions.  I treated them with the gel stain as I mentioned earlier.....really makes them look nice.  What do you guys think???

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Wow, that is some awesome stuff.  Its going to be a big challenge to work with those small pieces and make everything come together.  Yours looks absolutely fantastic !!!!

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Excellent tutorial!  I think this all looks incredible, Chuck.  I have a question about painting, as I will some day transition to wood builds.

 

When you paint the cove, for example, do you prime/seal first, or can you go directly to color?

 

Thanks, in advance - you are doing an incredible job.  I appreciate your care and attention to detail very much!

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Thanks guys...

 

Painting techniques!!! Another loaded question.  It really depends in who you ask. But i will explain my preferences.  I like sand the surface with 400 grit.  Then I seal it with wipe on poly.  Then i apply the Acrylic paint in very thin coats like water color.  Building up many layers.  
 

Now unfortunately you will get many who say this is not the right way.  But it has always served me well.  
 

I'm sure you will get many other suggestions about how it should be done.

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No its a bit darker.  I posted them for download so go ahead and download them and print them out.  Set your printer on the highest print quality.  Its hard to say.  It looks different in photos depending on the lighting.  For example this photo was taken with my Iphone.  It looks different than the blue in the photo below it.  But its the same model.....taken a few minutes apart.  Its probably somewhere between the two in reality.   Although my camera takes better pictures.  Thats the bottom photo which is what i use for my log photos.

 

 

 

phonepic.jpg

 

transomcarvings4.jpg

 

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Oh, good - I was wondering whether you used acrylics or oil-based paints.  I’m relieved to know that it’s acrylic, as I find that to be the most brush-friendly paint medium of all.

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I am so glad to hear you say that you've had good results painting over Wipe-on-Poly since I'm just about to do that on the Medway Longboat. Also, the top photo of the stern of the Winnie is jaw-dropping. I believe I will eventually have to build this ship...sooner than later I hope. It's just soooo beautiful!

 

Bob 

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Dude can build a ship model, do doubt about it....  So cool that you are giving everyone a chance to do something like this, awesome Chuck!

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Thanks guys.....finished the carvings today.  All that is left to do now is the fluted columns between the windows and the last two carvings.  Hopefully get to that next week.  That will finish up chapter 3.  

 

Then I have to make all this stuff for you guys which might take a while including writing that 3rd chapter.

 

Thanks again Jack!!!  This wouldnt be possible without you!!!  Fantastic work!!!

 

sterncarvings2.jpg

sterncarvings4.jpg

sterncarvings3.jpg

sterncarvings5.jpg

 

 

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First of all, thank you very much, Mr. Passaro. You have made it a reality. More importantly, you have not only given me, but also given all members the opportunity to participate in this project. You have taught everyone the skills of making the whole project, so that the fans not only enjoy in making(this model), but also learn the knowledge of ship model. I really enjoyed the process. 


I would also like to thank the enthusiastic members who participated in this group project together, and many members provided valuable modifications (design of the carvings), and thank MSW for this communication platform.

 

Thanks,

Jack

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