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HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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I believe so.  I believe it was the exception to have them as actual windows.  Most were false.  I am not entirely sure why but my guess is probably to make it stronger.  I could be wrong.

 

Chuck

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I just kind of figured that those windows were all blacked out mostly because glass was pretty expensive back then and basically all it would be doing is putting a window behind you when you were using the toilet it’s not like you were looking out at a nice view behind you while taking care of business.  Maybe in very large for second or third rates it would be different. I don’t know I’ve never seen a definitive reason either

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Feeling a little burnt out making rope and blocks....will be back at that tomorrow!!!

 

So today was a good day to start chapter 4....

 

This is where we start working inboard and get the deck planked and the bulwarks planked.

 

To start, We need to plank the sub decks.  Those are those areas that wont be seen and you are just creating a platform for the ladders.  Nothing will be seen down there so no need to start constructing coamings and other stuff.  Just neatly plank it with 1/4" x 3/64" planking strips.  Dont forget to run a pencil over one edge to simulate the caulking.  I started by running one strip down the center line and then I worked my way outward.  Picture is below....do this for both platforms.

 

In that same photo you can also see a laser cut piece glued to both sides of the bulkheads.  You can see numbers as reference for the bulkheads it sits between.  This starts the process of framing out the box so we can build the coamings.  You can also see that those pieces have laser etched mortises for the frames which will be added next.

gdeckframe.jpg

Next up, I added the beams...this is the center platform in the waist.  The three partial "deck" beams were sanded free of laser char.  the beams are also laser etched with mortises to accept the carlings. The carlings were cut from 1/8" x 1/8" cedar strips.  Please note that these photos just show a dry fit of all of these pieces.  The laser cutter does a great job of etching the deep mortises for the carlings.  Although this is the case, you should still square them up a bit and clean up the corners for best results.  I did this by scraping the mortises with a sharp #11 blade.  You wont have to use a chisel at all.  All these mortises need is a bit of scraping!!!

gdeckframe3.jpg

The carlings were cut to length carefully for a nice snug fit.  Dont cut them long and then force them into the mortises.  This will force your beams apart and give you problems later on.  Take your time with these.  You can adjust those deck beams "port-to-starboard" so the carlings sit correctly in the mortises. Make sure they are parallel to the center line of the deck and to each other.  Your coaming will be built over this.  This is just a dry fit so I could tweak them all. You can see all the reference letters I placed on top of each piece so I dont mix them up when I disassemble it.  Then it was glued in place permanently and the top sanded and faired.

gdeckframe1.jpg

Here is an image of the aft platform and its beams and framing completed.  This is done exactly the same way as the one in the waist.  The only difference is this has a central beam which has laser etched mortises on both sides.  This should give you a good idea on how I plan to create the quarter deck beams and framing.  The ability to laser etch mortises for any ledges and carlings is a huge game changer.  This technique will have many many applications!!!  You can see how it is possible to get nice tight joints.  And now you dont have to worry about measuring accurately for their placement on the beam and using a chisel to make mortises from scratch.

gdeckframe2.jpg

 

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This has to be the most impressive tutorial I have ever read. Thank you for explaining everything in such detail. I learned plenty from just reading through. What a beautiful build. 

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Thank you very much.  

 

No laser etched decking!!!!!  I absolutely despise tthem with all the planks laser etched.  It makes your entire model look kit-like when finished.  A model this size makes it nearly impossible to do anyway.  So yes we will be fully planking ours deck with wood strips.  But you will lots of help and reference lines to help you out.   

 

The false decking....

 

The false deck is now glued in position.  There are six large sheets.  They are 1/32" thick.  These false deck segments have many laser reference lines.  So everyone must be super careful, make sure all of the reference lines match up when positioning these.  Most important, make sure the center line between these is actually on the center line.  This will ensure all of your fittings and coaming run down the center of the deck as they should.  There is a trick that you may find helpful.  But first, you should absolutely do a dry run with all six sheets in position.  

 

Because everyone will fair the inside of the hull differently, these may be loose or tight on your model.  You may need to sand and trim the outside edges to get them to fit properly.  Dont worry about having a small gap along the bulwarks.  It is more important that you line up all of the reference lines and get the center running down the center.....

falsedecksheets.jpg

A good trick is to dry fit all six in position.  Then drill a few holes through the false deck sheets and into a few bulkheads.  If you insert a few pins in these you can use them as registration pins when you glue each segment in position permanently.  Drill all the registration pins for all six segments as you have them all in position.  I hope that makes sense.

 

You can see how there are two openings in that photo above for the two coamings which will be open companionways.  I decided to go ahead and make these two coamings now.  Although I didnt glue them in position.  They may get damaged while I plank the bulwarks so I just skipped ahead a bit to procrastinate a bit before planking.  You can see how they fit in those openings and on top of the framing you made for them.

 

falsedeckcoamings.jpg

All of the coaming pieces are laser cut.  They go together quickly.  They have the camber build into them which is a good thing.  You will also get a small right angle jig.  You will actually get two of these.  There use depends on which coamings you are building.  These first two coamings use the 5/64" thick jig.  All others will use a thinner jig.

 

You can use the outside of the jig to get a right angle on the coamings.  You dont want skewed coamings.  I usually build two pieces as shown below and set them aside.  Then I take the remining two sides and repeat the process.  To finish the coaming I then glue these two pieces together to complete the coaming.  

coaming1.jpg

This particular coaming is the aft one pictured on deck (J2).  I show this one because it has an additional timber that separates it into two parts.  There are notches for these and it was easy to just slip it right in and the coaming remains squared up.  Then I finish it off by sanding all of the laser char off.  I havent applied any finish yet.

 

Once you have the initial coaming completed, you must add thin strips along the inside edges to form the rabbet.  This is what the gratings will sit on.  These are 1/32" x 3/16" strips.  Everything is yellow cedar.  Lastly....you must round off the four corners above the deck planking (which we have yet to do).  That is why these two coamings (J1 and J2) use the thicker 5/64" jig.  Simply use it to round off the corners down to the jig  when the coaming is set against it.  You can just use a #11 blade to make some straight cuts and then round it off with some sandpaper.  You can see the finished corner on the left side.  All four will end up looking like that.  Only a small amount needs to be sliced off.  Dont cut too much of the corner away!!!

coaming2.jpg One last thing.....as with everything else.

 

You can paint these coamings black like the contemporary model or leave them natural.  Its up to you.  I havent decided yet but am leaning towards painting them black.  On such a big model like this I think it will break things up.  Otherwise it will look all to similar down the middle of the deck.  You guys have any preferences???

 

F9288-007.jpg

 

 

The HMS Amazon (contemp model) has a different painted look below....the qdeck is fully painted black while the gun deck only has the sides of the coamings painted black.  Which is odd.

 

amazon1.jpg

Finally.....you have the Minerva contemp model....They are all natural on the gun deck and all painted black on the quarter deck.  So many choices.   You could also just leave them all natural.   As you can see I like to really examine and study many contemporary models and that usually just leads to more difficulty in choosing which way to go!!!

Minerva model # 55 155.jpg

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On the question of dummy lights (blank windows):

 

The outer lights of the stern galleries were usually blank. The reason for this was that just forward of these dummies in the quarter galleries were the 'seats of office', or heads.

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I really like how the Amazon is finished, it has a nice weathered look. Not sure if this is from age or intended but I makes it look real. A lot of the models at the naval academy appear like this. I also like Minervas finish..I can’t decide either, on which direction to take mine! 
JJ

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Maybe the coamings on the quarter deck were painted black to give them a better protection, because they were more exposed to the weather. This might have not been necessary in the waist.

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Here is a look at the coaming painted black with a grating in position. But these will be removed when I start planking the bulwarks.  But first some pre-planking prep work.

 

paintedcoaming.jpg

Before I can start planking the bulkwarks, I need to add some filler timbers (laser cut) where the hawse holes will be drilled.  Then they were faired inboard.  In addition, a 1/4" x 3/64" strip was glued down the stem so-to-speak.  Shape the top round where the bowsprit hole is neatly.  Keep this neat and round.  The bulwark planking will abut the side of this vertical strip.

 

bowbulwarkfiller.jpg

And finally the bulwark planking can begin.  The two lower strakes are the first layer of spirketting. The top of the spriketing should run even with the lower edge of the port openings.  So you need to do some math.  The distance from the false deck to the bottom edge of the ports can vary from model to model.  It depends on so much....where you placed your sills....whether or not they are flat or angled inboard....etc.

 

So you want to run two strakes for the spirketting 3/64" thick.  On my model I used one 7/32" wide strake first and then the second upper strake was 1/4" wide.  This combination was the perfect width in my case.  Although you will inevitable find some ports that are slightly high or slightly low.  You will need to adjust these should that arise....but most of mine lined up pretty good.  You will be adding a second 1/32" thick layer to the spirketting later on.  

 

I did not simulate the seams with pencil because the bulwarks will be painted red.  Except of course for in the captains cabin aft.  There is a double line on the false deck showing where the captain cabin starts.  So aft of this reference I did in fact simulate the tarred lines.

 

So this photo shows the two strakes of the spirketting and how they run true with the bottom of the ports.  I also added the inboard side of the fixed blocks.  You can see one in the photo.  I used some wire pushed through the sheave holes from outboard to help line them up.  Let me know if you have any questions.

 

spirketing.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Looks really good Chuck, looking forward to chapter 4, chapter three as well. Lol.

does the 1/48 figure come with chapter 4? I could use a project manager on my Winnie.

JJ

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Personally I would have though that the coaming pieces would have been painted red not only because these often had additional cannon balls stored around them but also to make easier to see in the dark than ones painted black.  Maybe I am getting mixed up with later times than the Winnie. Glad to see the deck finally coming in on this model. Great progress by all, this has been a favorite blog to read each week.

 

Brian

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I have never seen red coamings before on any contemporary models.  Thats interesting.   Most often they are painted black or left natural.  

 

Chuck

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I am not sure how clearly you can see this....but if you look between those frames in the great cabin, you can spot the paneled bulkheads.  I have finished planking the bulwarks and am now in the process of paneling the bulwarks on the starboard side.  I am not crazy about the white panels on the contemporary model and will leave them natural.  I will have an update soon but wanted to post this image for you guys to examine first.

 

bulkheadpanels.jpg

 

Chuck

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Are these panels just painted, or actually built with frames and fillings?  

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I am not sure what you mean...

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How to explain in a foreign language...

Here are two photos. If there are Copyright issues, please delete them.

20200430_184416.thumb.jpg.92600c1b628ec0306bb191b94c37187e.jpg20200430_184355.thumb.jpg.475acd12d9688961093288247cc60b0e.jpg

The first show the panels with frames and fillings. The second shows something like plywood with a painted frame.

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No not at all....we wont be building each paneled section.   They are laser etched.   But you could go that route if you are feeling ambitious. Let me show you what I have been up to.  The bulwarks have been planked inboard with their first layer of planks.   The first photo below shows the different widths I used.  This might be slightly different on your model but you get the idea.

 

The bottom two strakes will have the top edge flush with the bottom of the ports.   The three strakes above that between each port were divided up so the top of those was flush with the top of the gun ports.   

 

On top of that goes a strip of 7/32" x 3/64" cedar.   This takes you to the shear along the waist.   I have NOT simulated the seams with pencil because they will all be painted red.   The inboard layer of the fixed blocks were added too and the planking carefully cut around them.  BUT....wait until after you plank the first layer of the inboard bulwarks to put the aft-most fixed block shell in position.   It falls on the deck clamp which is thicker and this particular fixed block sheel should be glued on TOP of the first layer of Bulwark planking.   

inboardbulwarks6.jpg

The deck clamps are laser cut for you.  The quarter deck clamp is in two lengths.   You need to add the forward section first.   Line up the front of it with the hance piece.   This is important!!!  The notches laser cut in the deck clamp are for the quarter deck beams.   We want to make sure they are lined up properly on both sides.  If done properly your deck beams wont be crooked!!!  Dont sand the laser char off the seam between the two pieces.   This will screw up the placement of the deck beams.  Just butt them together.

 

Once the forward section is glued in place....glue in the aft section.  Below.

 

inboardbulwarks1.jpg

This was left a bit longer on the aft side so you can tweak it to fit your model.  Another really important note.

 

You will notice that the bottom of the last notch in the deck clamp is even with the top of the stern windows.  This is crucial.  If your deck beams are too high it would be trouble.   A little lower wouldnt hurt though to be safe.   So please please make sure that this is correct.  You will need to adjust it if needed back there.   In fact you should probably clamp the deck planks in position before you glue them in as a test.   Make any needed adjustments before you glue them in.  And a reminder again to not sand the forward end of this deck clamp where the two sections butt together.  Only sand the aft end to make it fit if need be.

 

Here is a look at the forward deck clamp for the forecastle.  Same is true with this one.   Position the end along the hance piece in the waist.   Then cut the other end at the stem to length which will need to be shaped round later for to make the bowsprit hole nice and neat.

 

ALSO.....pre bend this deck clamp with heat.  I used the hair dryer.  Dont try and force bend it at the bow because it will certainly break along the notches for the deck beams.

 

inboardbulwarks2.jpg

The next step is to install the paneled sheets on the planked bulwarks.  These will appear in the cabins and captains quarters.  They are very thin and laser etched with the panel design.  The full panels between each gun port are added first.  Then the panels above and below each port can be tweaked for a tight fit.  You want to have tight seams here.   Try not to have the seams to visible when your done.   So clean the laser char from them.

 

inboardbulwarks3.jpg

 

Notice the line on the false deck going port to starboard.  This indicates where a bulkhead wall will be.  Much later in the project of course.  Keep this in mins as the forward edge of the first panel must end so you can push the walled bulkead against it later.  So examine those notches in the deck clamps.  This paneled bulkhead that stretches across the deck will be under the deck beam.   Make sure the forward end of this first paneled section will end up under the beam.  See how it lines up in the photos below.

 

The double line on the false deck is another paneled bulkhead that separates the captains cabin.  Note how it lines up with the notch for the deck beam above it.

 

inboardbulwarks4.jpg

The cannon is just a prototype for the Winnie that I built.  I use it to test how it fits on the model as I work on it.  It looks like it will fit perfectly once the deck is planked.

 

A quick note about these panels....I have seen some odd shaped ports on the some of the models being built.  Their placements is also sketchy as we have mentioned in many logs.   Especially that aft most port and the entrance to the quarter galleries.  I mention this because these panels are pretty precise. Although some wiggle room has been designed in them...if you didnt measure your ports properly or if they are in the wrong position, your panels will likely not fit.  This is why careful measuring early on is so important.   So for that reason....these panels are OPTIONAL.  You dont have to use them. Especially if the dont fit properly because of your port placement and gun port shapes.   So test them first with a dry fit to see if they will all work.  You might need to get a little creative..

 

And here is a final image of the model today.  I am about to add the second layer of spirketting and deck clamps.  Then I will paint the buwarks red.  But the panels will be left natural.

 

I havent done this yet on the port side so once I am done I will repeat all of this on the port side.  Any questions.

 

inboardbulwarks5.jpg

  

 

 

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Oh but you have been busy! Love those panels.  Would love to see them varnished but they wouldn't match the rest of the model finish. And those deck clamps certainly insure a level deck. Very innovative work, Chuck.

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Ahhh!!!!  You were the only one to catch that!!!!   Gold star for you.  Yes I made a foolish mistake.  I glued the first panel in upside down.   And upside down it will remain.  Once everything is all done it wont be too terrible.  But yes, as soon as I finished it I realized my stupid error.

 

So please be careful when you glue yours in!!!

 

Its not a huge issue.

 

Chuck

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I love to see your workmanship and to read your "tutorials".

I'm probably the only one who doesn't know this, but what is a 'spirketting'?

Thanks.

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That is what the thicker layer of bulwark strakes that are between the gun ports and the deck.  They are usually about an inch thicker so when you see a model they stand proud of the strakes above Them .

 

In the contemporary example below they are painted red. But the strakes above them are not.  Look at the planking in the waist.

 

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Chuck, That model is another example with red painted coamings. Wich one is it? The cabin panels of your Winni look great, even upside down :)!!!

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That is the science museum model of the 74 gun Warrior.  Also note the deck beams painted red on each side.  I may be doing this on our model.  Its a very common feature although in some cases just the knees are painted red.

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Thanks for your quick reply on spirketting.  I checked my photo library and sure enough; there was spirketting on the HMS Victory I visited at Portsmouth back in 2015.

Portsmouth09.thumb.jpg.2bcfca44714f28a0e7d0c7fcf356c985.jpg

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Next up it was time to add the second layer of spirketting (the lower two strakes) and the 7/32" wide plank above the ports.  I used planks that were the same width but just 1/32" thick.  You can even sand them thinner if you like.   I also added the aft shell for fixed block.  See it forward of the panelling?  This should be added at this stage so you can plank the second layer around it.

 

Note how I also added one more 1/32" second layer strake above that 7/32" wide strip.  The top edge follows along the bottom of the notches in the deck clamp.  I use various width strips because you will need to taper it.  It is not a consistent width.  Just make sure the top edge is flush with the bottom of the notches in the deck clamp.  MOST important....look at the forward end of this additional trip.  Notice where it starts in relationship to the first notch in the deck clamp.  This is important because it will aid you later when we build the platforms for the gangways.

inboardbulwarks7.jpg

Here is a view of the bow area.  Same things apply.  Notice where the aft end of the plank ends in this instance.   Once again it is even with that first notch.

inboardbulwarks8.jpg

Sand everything smooth and prep the bulwarks for painting.  Then paint it red.   But dont paint the fancy panels aft.  Here is what my model looks like at this stage.  I still have to complete the port side....havent started planking that yet.  

inboardbulwarks9.jpg

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