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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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As I am about to start planking above the wales, I wanted to spend a moment talking about milling planks.  Specifically Alaskan Yellow cedar but this is true for most woods.  I will be offering a cherry version of this project and this is also true of cherry wood.

 

Like everyone else, I cut my sheets from larger billets of wood.  Below you can see one of the these "bricks" of yellow cedar lumber.   It is a 2 x 6 that has been cut to 15" long segments.   In that same photo you can see a very large 1/4" sheet that was cut from the side of the brick.  It is pristine with no visible grain and the surface quality is beautiful which is what you want in a sheet of wood.   On top of that 5 1/2" wide sheet is a 2" wide smaller sheet literally cut from the same brick shown.   It was cut from the top of the brick instead.  Notice the ugly grain pattern that is quite evident and if you were to get this sheet you would not be a happy camper.....BUT

 

cuttingcedarplanks.jpg

When I rip planking strips from a 1/4" thick sheet of wood, I dont want to use that wider sheet.  The useable visible face of each plank would have the ugly side showing when you used it on your model.  You would absolutely see the grain and it would probably not bend the same way......so   I actually use the two inch wide boards to cut all of my planking strips from.  I keep a steady supply on hand and even use wipe on poly on a portion of the "good" edge that will become the planking you see on the hull.   This makes it easier to pick wood that is the same color so all of the planks will match on your hull.  See the photo below which shows a portion of my 2" wide planking stock ready for milling.

 

Whenever I cut the planking strips for a Cheerful package they are cut from these 2" wide pieces rather than the really wide sheets.  Its the proper way to rip planking strips.   I know that most people do the math in their head and figure they will get many more strips from the wide sheet....BUT...it will have a really noticeable negative impact on a well-planked hull.


I will soon add a category in my store to allow folks to buy these 2" sheets rather than get the really nice wider sheets when they need planking strips.  Most may be surprised and disappointed when they get the narrower boards until of coarse they start ripping strips from them which will be pristine and beautiful as you can see below.  I can get 20 strips 3/64" thick from each of these with a blade that has a .30 kerf....I hope this was helpful and insightful to those of you who might not be familiar with this or may be thinking of getting a Byrnes saw to mill your own planking strips.  I will call these " Planking Stock for milling planking strips"  in my online store.  cuttingcedarplanks1.jpg

Almost forgot....here is what that snow white resin figurehead looks like once I applied some color to it.  I used three colors of weathering powder only.   There is no paint on this.   The color matches the wood very closely and I will be detailing how you can achieve this result later on...

 

resinfigurehead1.jpg

 

Now its time to start planking.

 

 

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It's really great, high quality resin castings are what many modelers expect,can't wait to see hull's planking  in next step.

 

Jack

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Thanks for the update and milling tips. She's looking great and thankfully the busy summer

and complete lack of shoptime quenches my desire to start on her! 

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plankingtosheer.jpg

thanks guys....Rusty, I am just waiting til I finish planking a bit more.  Its been a long time since I had to cut around so many gun ports.  The Starboard side is a third of the way complete.   

 

You can see the five strakes of the wales and black strake which are darker.  This first layer was done this way on purpose so I could make sure that I put the second and final layers on the right strakes.  Also....the black strake can be left bright and unfinished or painted black along with the wales.  In this case the wales on the Winnie are so wide I think it would look a bit much.  So I will NOT be painting the black strake.   I am using other contemporary models like the Amazon as inspiration for this.  See below.  Imagine if you can if the black strake was also painted black on the model below.  It would be too wide and look over-bearing.  Dont forget to click on those pics of Amazon.....they are quite large and quite a treat to see this magnificent model up close.    I have these handy as inspiration while working on my model.amazon2.jpg

amazon3.jpg

Oh I also made this mock up of the other carvings to display at joint clubs.   I know its not the best picture....but I thought I would post what all of the other carvings will look like.  These dont have any finish on them.

sterncarving.jpg

 

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Forgive me Chuck, I have read and re-read your milling description and I am still wanting. In the first picture with the billet, is the grain running from L to R? If so then when you rip off a 1/4" sub-billet, say from that upper edge of the billet your "sub" billet has a clear face and the resulting planks are almost 1/4 sawn? Am I correct? And you can get the same results with cherry?

 

And in terms of bending is edge bending any more difficult?

 

Thanks.

 

Joe

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Leopard did a great job showing what I was describing......and no.....edge bending is fine either way.  But the face of your strip is smooth and grain-free on your model.

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Got it! Indeed Leopard I should have done what you did. I guess what was throwing me off was what appears to be milling marks on the face of the large billet.

Joe

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Yes they are the milling marks from the monster bandsaw I use to mill sheets from those larger bricks of wood.  But you dont see any on the wide sheet I milled.  What you do see on the smaller 2" wide sheet is the grain pattern.......so when you rip the strips from this smaller sheet the "important" side of each strip wont have them.

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Ditto Maury's comment Chuck, there is no comparison with the older mass produced kits.  Kudos!

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Chuck

Are the carvings Castello box or English/European boxwood?   Great work regardless, just curious.

Allan

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Neither...They are some weird Asian Boxwood.  Its what they use to make all of the little carved sculptures you can buy on the web.  It has no grain pattern at all and carves like butter.   But it is more yellow than Castello or even European box.

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No I dont sell the wood or have any of that material.  Its pretty impossible to import other than by commisioning the cnc carvings.  Damn near impossible to import raw wood from China.

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I have finished planking the starboard side up to the sheer.   I will start on the port side this weekend.   As you can see now, the wales and black strake are much darker than the wood above it.  That was done on purpose so I could easily identify the wales when I add the second layer.  Having said that,  the Alaskan Yellow cedar is really nice stuff for working this large.  I like the color and its easy to work with.  This is the largest model ship I have seen made from Yellow cedar.   This will be a great test of how versatile and useful it is for ship modeling.

 

plankedtosheer1.jpg

plankedtosheer.jpg

plankedtosheer2.jpg

 

Chuck

 

 

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Thanks guys...

 

Interesting about the Alaskan cedar is that like other woods, there are plenty of color variations within a batch of lumber.  It was fairly easy for me to select the darker/more tan cedar I used for the wales which incidentally is a near perfect match for boxwood.   You would of course need a huge amount in your wood pile to select the tone you wanted.  I could have very easily selected that same color I used for the wales for the entire model.  But I wanted to use the more traditional and more plentiful lighter and warmer tone which is what most will see when they get this.

 

Chuck

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Beautiful ship!

question: does the colour differences remain over time?

the socalled wallnut in the European kirs also show rather large colourvariations. These tend to disappear over time, as the wood changes colour due to the influence of sunlight. 

 

Jan 

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I dont know.......I havent used it for very long.  Time will tell!!!   But I am being very careful to pick wood for planking that is very close in color.

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If we did not know better Chuck you would think that is a 3D generated model - you are a master of your craft Sir!

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, amateur said:

Beautiful ship!

question: does the colour differences remain over time?

the socalled wallnut in the European kirs also show rather large colourvariations. These tend to disappear over time, as the wood changes colour due to the influence of sunlight. 

 

Jan 

Amateur,

I’ve been using Alaskan Yellow cedar in ship building for 20 years. It’s one of my favorite woods. It does tend to slightly change color as it ages into a warmer yellowish color. I use Tung Oil and keep the models out of daylight. 

 

Below is a ship built 20 years ago that I haven’t finished yet and has been stored away in a box all those years with no light. As you can see, the tone of the wood is still very yellow, but it has aged a bit and slightly darker.  But not too much. 😀

 

 

 

B1812A14-C91B-4C50-8265-9C82B4C30762.thumb.jpeg.a5deca51cbcfc097f717c0261fffd26e.jpeg405652EA-A7D3-4904-920D-BDCE71087806.thumb.jpeg.43e64edfa670bfe328aa8de02916d1ce.jpeg938438A7-804E-4502-A74A-EFB7D70BA077.thumb.jpeg.176e75ae92c3d40fa909db0da445ab62.jpeg

 

Edited by Dowmer

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