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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Group Prototype by Chuck (1/4" scale)

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I finished the wales and black strake on both sides and painted them black.   But I still had to add the anchor lining.  Rather than use individual boards I just laser cut the shape from some 1/32" sheet.  This will cover the wales but then an additional strip of thicker wood must placed on top of this to cover the black strake.  They are all flush outboard but the strip on top of the black strake for the lining remains bright.

 

The 1/32" sheet for the lining was gradually sanded thinner as it worked down towards the bottom of the wales.

 

anchorlining.jpg

anchorlining1.jpg

Now before I start planking below the wales, I have a few things to do first.  One of them is to fair inboard.  This is not a fun task and it will make a mess.  But I want to get it out of the way now so all of the dust falls through the hull rather than just fall into one that is fully planked.  

 

One thing I notice when folks build my kits (or any kit for that matter) is how they fair inboard.  They never quite know how thick to make the bulwarks.  In most cases they are left way too wide which makes the entire model look clumsy and kit-like.  To help with this on the Winnie, I designed a "fairing cap" that will be 3/16" wide.  This needs to be placed on the top of the sheer.  Then when I start fairing inboard I will be better able to maintain that 3/16" measurement consistently for the bulwarks.  Some portions of this "fairing cap" were laser cut like the area above the hances and at the bow.  For the remainder a 3/16" x 1/16" strip was used.  See below.

 

fairingcap.jpg

This may look odd at this point but dont worry....this "cap" will be completely covered by the fancy molding and volutes.   These wont be added to much later in the project but here is a look at some prototype "scrolls"  I worked on.  One of the things that was troubling me was how I was going to handle these scrolls.   Sure, many people can carve them and they look great.  But these are difficult for most.  I could have provided castings but then the profile molding would be impossible to match so it looks good.

 

So I have been experimenting.  This is what I have at this point and I think it looks pretty good.  This of course means that I know have to provide all of the molding for this project along with the carved scrolls.  They may not be as good as those that are hand carved or scraped, but I think they look better than most and will do the job nicely.  I still have to tweak a few things.  What do you guys think?  By the way...the top aft scroll and molding behind it is made from boxwood.   The forward scroll and molding below it were made with teh same process but out of Yellow cedar.  I think the results are pretty similar although the boxwood version is slightly darker.  The Cedar version of the scroll was much more fragile to sand than the box version.  I will have to decide which to include.

 

There was no carving what-so-ever or scraping.   The scrolls and molding were laser cut.  I just sanded the sides to remove the char and rounded the sides off a bit using 420 grit sandpaper.  The notches or grooves were laser etched at various depths and I just left the char in those untouched.   I applied wipe on poly over them and it looks pretty good.  These are just test fit against the hull to see how they look.  

fairingcap1.jpg

 

 

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Interesting approach to the hances and moldings. They look very good in your photo, Chuck.

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Thanks...by the way, the molding in the last photo is just 3/32 wide and 1/32" thick. The etched grooves vary both in width and depth to simulate that profile.  This was rather difficult and required about eight hours of testing, cutting and retesting.

 

The etched grooves on the volutes had to match as they turned into the molding and they have the added difficulty of narrowing even more until they reached the "button".  It was quite the challenge.  Here is an earlier test run....I must have made about 60 of these tweaking it each time.   Boxwood is on top....cedar is below it.  I still have to reduce the volute by about 3%.  It just a hair too big.

 

volutes.jpg

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Simply amazing what you can do with that mind of yours! I could never achieve those results by hand. 

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Thanks guys....If you look closely the molding and hance has four flutes or three etched grooves.  This is what would normally be used on a molding but I may run a test with just two etched grooves to see how it looks.

 

This really pushes the limits with the laser cutter because the grooves are so tiny and not etched very deeply.  I think it looks a bit busy and maybe a simpler profile would look even better.   But it could just be that i have been staring at these for eight hours and am losing my mind.

 

luckily these wont be needed for while so I can do more testing.  This is certainly a benefit as a designer to own your laser cutter.  I couldnt imagine this kind of subtle testing and tweaking if I had to send these out for cutting each time.

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They look really fantastic and I can't imagine what 3% will do. Expanding the photo the boxwood holds the cut better than the cedar, but the cedar is very nice.( I really had to blow up the photo to see the difference) Great job. You've become a laser magician. We'll have to get you a merlin pointed hat.

Will

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I really like those scrolls, and the other details you are making on the Winnie. This model is turning out very impressive. The examples of both wood types are a pleasure to see. And thanks for the lesson about fairing inboard, a new one for me.

 

A while back on this web site, I recall a certain Mr. Chuck Passaro teaching to use an x-acto blade for doing finer details such as curving scrolls or the s-shape decorations a lot of ships of the time period had. Perhaps that same advice would help the volute details.

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Thank you.....yes I could break out the chisels and blades but the fun challenge for me is to try and engineer a really good part so that I wont have to.  While it was fresh in my brain and different ideas were swirling around in there, I decided to do a simplification test with fewer etched grooves.  I think this is the winner at it achieves exactly what I am shooting for.  The aft upper hance is new and made from boxwood.  I will go with boxwood on the final versions too.  I also reduced the scroll in size and it is now perfectly sized for the Winnie.   I added a simulated cap rail which will be painted black so I could see the molding better.

 

Now back to making rope and blocks which I have fallen very behind with since I spent a couple of days fiddling with the scroll-work and molding.

 

volutes1.jpg

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Carved scrolls on actual contemporary model.....I would encourage as many willing to try and carve them but I think my laser cut versions will do just fine.  But nothing beats a hand carved version.

 

 volutes.JPG

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Chuck are the scrolls going to individually purchased or part of a kit. Such as a ornamentation kit.

The laser ones look fantastic.

Will

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Dont really know yet.   I will probably gang up several parts of the project and over them along with others that will be built in a given Chapter.

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When I was in architecture school, the first hand held calculators appeared. We asked our structures teacher if we could use them, and he said, "Those are just a passing fad. You will always have to know how to use a slide rule...."

 

Mark

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Thanks guys....Chisels are something I am very comfortable with.   But when you are trying to mass produce a project for many,  there is a whole other side of the fun you guys dont get to see.  For examle,   in order to try and make a part that is mass-produce-able, there is so much testing and re-testing.  

 

moldingtest.jpg

 

I must have laser cut over 100 hance pieces and molding samples.   I sanded and finished tested about two dozen of those.   When testing,  they must be placed on the model temporarily which can be problematic if I am not careful.  The first photos I posted yesterday of the molding and hance pieces was probably 50 versions ago.    You should compare the photos because it is interesting to see how the design changed over the last few days.  With each new try it gets a little batter.....baby steps.

 

This was my final test just about one hour ago with the last iteration of hance pieces and molding.   They were lightly tacked to the model with the tiniest drop of glue.  But the molding can be hard to see against the same color background.   So with each test, I used some blue painters tape where the painted frieze will eventually go.  Although not exactly the right color it is close enough to give me a good sense of how the molding will look.  Making laser cut moldings and hance pieces is new territory for me.  Although I tried it with the Confederacy kit, I wasnt able to test it as much as I can now that the laser cutter is only 3 feet away from my workbench.

moldingtest1.jpg

Many wonder why these kits are so expensive...I cant tell you how expensive it is to test this much while trying to produce the very best product or design concept.  This is why it is so upsetting when another company in a foreign land will just wait it out and copy the final product.  That saves so much time and money and aggravation.  But I digress.....Testing on the molding and hances have lasted three days.....I am so far behind with making blocks and rope!!!

 

These will be the final iteration of hances although the molding between the ports is traditionally different.  I just havent had time to develop those yet.   Lots more to do.  I hope you are interested in the trials and tribulations of a model designer.  There are good days and there are bad days.  Days where everything you try just turn out like crap....and its back to the drawing board!!!  Hopefully that isnt the case here.  🤞

 

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Chuck said:

yes I could break out the chisels and blades but the fun challenge for me is to try and engineer a really good part so that I wont have to.  While it was fresh in my brain and different ideas were swirling around in there, I decided to do a simplification test with fewer etched grooves.  I think this is the winner at it achieves exactly what I am shooting for.  The aft upper hance is new and made from boxwood.  I will go with boxwood on the final versions too.  I also reduced the scroll in size and it is now perfectly sized for the Winnie.   I added a simulated cap rail which will be painted black so I could see the molding better.

Good idea, Mr. Chuck always has some unique ideas... For example, the ribs assembly method of his cross-section KIT last time.

Edited by hjx

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Chuck,

thank you for the insights into what it takes to develop a kit. You really help explain just how complex the process really is. It is looking great!

 

Mark

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Thank You....You can always buy the starter package when it becomes available.  That will contain plans minus the templates for the bulkheads.  You wouldnt need them because you get them laser cut.

 

Chuck

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I love to see these updates, thank you for posting them! Your goal of producing such high quality products is much appreciated and it's really interesting to see how it all comes together.

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There is a "feeding frenzy" about to happen in these waters. Should I keep to the shore and wait a bit or wade in?

Joe

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