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Ship paintings


Vegaskip

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/28/2021 at 2:58 AM, lmagna said:

Thanks El

I'm a bit of a dummy when it comes to post WWII and modern Navy

None of us are expert on everything (or anything maybe). I only responded because I had the referenced book (Sumrall) on the shelf next to me when I read your post.

 

Cheers,

 

Keith

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Hi Jim, I just stumbled on these, and will concur with everyone else - you have an exceptional talent.  The thing that most impresses me is the way you catch perspective and line, on objects that have such subtle, graceful shapes ie ships, waves and clouds. And then skimming through again, your use of a splash of colour.

 

Your paintings of the Arctic convoys bring back memories of my youth - not in the 40s, but the 70s - where they were frequently referenced, and featured in an Alistair MacLean novel (HMS Ulysses, I think).  But for all that water-colour and your talent lend themselves to grey ships, grey sea and white wave tops, it is your paintings of sailing ships moored, or near the coast, that have brought me most joy. So let me give you every encouragement.  

 

We know of the great ships of the 18th and 19th centuries as being the largest and most complex machines of their time, but that might lead us to think that they were manufactured in the very methodical ways in which - post Henry Ford - we manufacture most things today.  Early in the your posts here, you showed a small painting of a ship under construction at Bucklers Hard, which correctly shows that ship-building was often closer to cottage industry than industrial production.  I recently read Peter Moore's Endeavour, whose descriptions of 18th century Whitby (then Britains most productive ship yard), describes ships on props stuck up creeks, rather than the crisp dockyards of Portsmouth.  As it happens I'm drawn to both Whitby and Bucklers Hard - I live in Yorkshire, but have family near Bucklers Hard, and am currently building a model of HMS Snake which (I'm tempted to say who!) was built there.   So if either of those locations attracts you, please feel encouraged.  

 

Best wishes, and, well, thanks for sharing

 

Mike

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Thank you for your comments and words of encouragement. My paintings seem to go in trends. I was heavily 'into'  the Bolitho books, which lead to me trying to research Dockyard ancillary craft ( didn’t find a lot but led to the Stepping the foremast pic). so I did several paintings based on the Napoleonic period . The Bucklers Hard one is based on a model I remember seeing. I am presently back on Arctic Convoy stuff in relation to the 80th anniversary of the arrival of the first Russian Convoy in Arkhangelsk, and the 'Marina Raskova' disaster. My wife and I have been invited to take part, in conjunction with an exhibition of a selection of my paintings at the Arkhangelsk Local Lore Museum. Unfortunately due to several reasons, not least Corona Virus, we won’t be able to take part. However I take it as an honour to be asked.

Jim

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  • 2 months later...
14 hours ago, Vegaskip said:
This afternoon's little trip to the North Atlantic. HMCS Assiniboine

 

I made several of these 'small' trips with frigates (they lasted much longer than an afternoon), I clearly recognize the atmosphere in your painting. Honestly I don't have much nostalgia for it.
Painted very truthfully. I am a fan of your work!

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Thank you both for commenting. The beauty of my 'little trips' is that it’s easy to come back from. Like being a Grand parent. Nice to have the grandkids, but nice to hand them back.
I have been off painting for a while, really only doing the stuff for the 'Lore Museum' in Arkhangelsk. I’ve been told it will become part of a permanent exhibition of the a Russian Arctic Convoys.

Jim

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you both for commenting. I tend to 'build' a painting as I go, the HDML came along to fill the fore ground still got some smoke and Balloons for the town. The world was coal burning in those days, so the pic, as is, is not really true. I was born and brought up in Edinburgh, which was nick named 'Auld Reekie' .

 

 

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