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suggestions for drill

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Hi all,

I'm here again to ask for help. I need to buy a mini-drill (to make some holes in wood, for ships), so I have no idea with characteristics are important to check.

 

I found (at my usual shop) the OC 19104. What do you think about it? Is it ok? Or better to choose something else?

 

Thanks

Alessandro

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This may be the time to start a collection of the Micro Lux tools from Micromart. I have most of them and with the exception of the belt sander they are excellent tools. They have a wonderful mini drill that i use almost every day. 

Best regrads

kevin

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The main question would be how big or how small the holes would be, you want to drill. Down to 0,5 mm this is not a very big issue, but below that the run-out of the drill-spindle and the chuck/collets become a crucial variable in your considerations.

 

I gather, if you are based in continental Europe, as your first name might suggest, you may want to look into PROXXON-products, for both hand-held and bench-drills. Have intensively used their bench-drill for the last 35 or so years (I must admit, after a lot of abuse due to oversize work etc., now the bearings aren't the best anymore). All PROXXON-drills can be used either with a drill-chuck or collets. In general, I prefer the latter, as they are smaller and have a smaller run-out.

 

I never had any of the fancy Dremel or PROXXON hand-drills. Bought a simple DC electric motor in aluminium tube and with a collet attachment that is still alive and well after 40 years of heavy (ab)use. Again, I think steel collets are preferable over drill-chucks.

 

For a hand-held drill I would try out how it feels in your hand - diameter/balance. The rest is not so important.

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For convenience and ease of use, I have been enjoying the

Dremel 8050, but it requires additional collets and its price

on European Amazon is absurd

Edited by Jaager

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You really need to look at the Dremel Micro 8050 I have bragged about this drill continually I was reluctant to buy it because it has a built in battery absolutely no problem to date holds a long charge when not in use i place it back in the charger. This tool is amazing $ 85.00 can get a drill bit into most places extremeley light, I have done 20 minutes of continuous HEAVY sanding still charged will take all attachments with right collets, light enough for  carving its absolutely amazing..

 

They have other battery dremels where the battery is not built in but they are bigger and heavier. Most people are put off because of the built in battery glad I went ahead and bought. Use for all jobs inside and outside the home not encumbered by extension cords.

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I didn't see any mention as to what the use will be?

 I use a dremel, for simple abuse, for anything bigger than an 1/8 of an inch or for extensive sanding/grinding I will use the Woodcarver.

Even if I am pinning cases or cabinets together, I tend to let the depth of my cut help decide which drill I'm going to use, at this point I'm using a large hand drill.

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Hi all,

I have been a long time inactive on the forum (but continued to read). I bought the Proxxon and I'm very happy of it. I have almost finished my Pinta (but I'm too ashamed to show it). So I want to say thank you to the whole forum for the precious suggestions :)

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As others have said there may need to be some clarification of the desired small hole size in order to establish a "correct" answer....including what is the definition of "small".

For creating holes with #60 or smaller drill bits, particularly as one approaches bits smaller than #70, there is no better drill press than the Cameron Micro Drill Press.  Cameron is a California based company and their drill presses seem frightfully expensive when first considered, but the spindles run very true and I can regularly drill #80 sized holes without any worry of breaking a bit.

 

Yes, there are a number of small drill press manufacturers but the Cameron (formerly Treat) Drill Press is the gold standard...

 

I bought mine about 35 years ago and after I got over the "pain" of the initial cost, I've enjoyed worry free drilling ever since.

 

One of those "buy it and forget it" type of purchases to advance one's skill set...

 

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I have about 10 proxxon tools. The drill press is one of my favourites. Check their website if you want to see it in action. Excellent quality product. 

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On 10/18/2017 at 4:28 PM, John Allen said:

You really need to look at the Dremel Micro 8050.......

Thanks for the suggestion John! I have had 15 great years out of my corded Dremel, and wasn't even thinking of replacing it until I read your review, and then other reviews online. I have been leery of battery operated tools in the past, but for smaller jobs (probably 80% of them) this will be great! I will keep my old, powerful corded Dremel and I'm sure the two will complement each other well.

 

Will stop at Home Depot on my way home and pick one up :-)

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On 10/18/2017 at 4:28 PM, John Allen said:

Use for all jobs inside and outside the home not encumbered by extension cords.

Personally, I heartily agree with that, as power chords are the bane of people in wheelchairs! I find them constantly in the way.  I am either rolling over the chord or getting it tangled in the chair itself.:default_wallbash: I also use that Dremel drill and really like using it for just that reason.:D

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Has anyone bought the Milwaukee rotary tool. ? I have a number of 12 volt batteries and though this would be a good addition to my shop.

 

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I have to agree with Cliff Ward.  The Cameron Drill Press is wonderful.  I, too, have had mine for over 40 years and it is a great accurate machine.  Coupled with the little x-y table you can do just about anything.  I like mine so much that I picked up another on E-Bay last year for my second home and workshop.  Once again as Cliff said it is not cheap but it will last a lifetime.

 

The manual 164 is the one that I have.  Didn't check the current price but watch E-Bay as they show up every now and then.

 

http://cameronmicrodrillpress.com/product/cameron-series-164/

 

 

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