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Furniture like tables and chairs???


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Just guessing here, but I think it would to a certain degree depend on the Captain's finances - a well-off captain would probably provide his own furniture and it would most likely be in the fashion of the day (there should be lots of images on the Net if you do a google search), though unless he was very wealthy, I'd expect it to be a relatively plain version of that style. If he wasn't well-off, the ship's carpenter would probably make it for him and it would be VERY plain.

 

Steven

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Hi Tim;

 

There was an official 'establishment' for the issue of tables to Royal Navy vessels.  They were issued by the dockyard.  I cannot remember where I saw it,  though.  Don't recall anything about chairs.  Sea chests probably filled the duty much of the time,  especially in the gun-room,  and for at least some of the ward-rooms' inhabitants. 

 

I remember also seeing pictures of part of a table recovered from a ship-wreck,  but again,  I am afraid I cannot remember much else about it.

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

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Hi Tim/Steven;

 

Further to earlier posts,  I am reading Lavery's book 'Nelsons's Navy,  Ships,  Men & Organization',  and he says that the ship's carpenter and his mates were responsible for making the mess tables and benches for the crew,  and the tables and chairs for the gunroom and wardroom.  As this would have been done using government supplied timber,  there would certainly have been an official listing of what they were allowed to make.

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

Edited by Mark P
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Where did I read about a French Ship -think it was French- which upon going into battle would hoist the nicer furniture high aloft into the rigging, to keep it safe from cannon fire and prevent its becoming more splinters in an engagement? Why they wouldn’t strike it into the hold I do not remember. It may have been John Keegan’s book The Price of Admiralty? Anyway I love the thought of including the incongruous furniture in the rigging on a model!

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Frankie,

As near as I can tell, the furniture would have went below.  The problem is that many times (usually?), the rigging was targeted to kill a ship's movement and maneuvering.  Also, sending it up would have put it in the way of the crew working aloft.   I suppose that sending them up the mast could have happened but I don't think it's likely.

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