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Stuntflyer

HMS Winchelsea 1764 by Stuntflyer (Mike) - 1/4" scale

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Hello and a Happy New year to everyone!

 

I've been making some progress on the hull planking. The last two belts on the starboard side minus one strake are done. As tempting as it was to add the last strake I knew that I would still need a clamping area to adhere to when I start again on the port side. Clamping against the keel doesn't work since the angle of the clamp would pull the plank up and away from the bulkhead. Moving the clamp down five strakes changes the angle of the clamp just enough to hold the plank tight against the bulkhead.

_DSC9408.thumb.jpg.13ec22535adbd4d25069e50127ddf7e2.jpg

I've added a few photos showing the planking detail both fore and aft.

Winchelsea_9403.thumb.jpg.378833401ceb727e6c893507e0b1f6da.jpg

Winchelsea_9404.thumb.jpg.f79bcc3d0f42edcb0c39b6de110aab57.jpg

 

All of the sanding so far has been done with Soft Sanders. They are hard foam shapes that you wrap with adhesive backed sandpaper which is supplied by the company. The sandpaper lasts forever it seems. I am using 180 and 320 grit. http://www.softsanders.com/products/wood. I find that these two shapes work well. I cut them into 3" to 5" lengths. They conform to the hull shape allowing for a smooth transition when sanding.

softsander.jpg.09b8c6dee8f1c8cbf9b32d4fa1661b57.jpg

Mike

 

Edited by Stuntflyer

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That really looks good Mike.  Cant wait to see it right side up and in person.   That certainly sets the standard for the group.   Its proof that slow and steady is the way to go.  Did you have many planks that were discarded into the scrap box?   I know I did and it is typical for such an outstanding planking job.   

 

Chuck

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5 hours ago, Chuck said:

Did you have many planks that were discarded into the scrap box?   I know I did and it is typical for such an outstanding planking job.   

 

Chuck

Thank you! Yup, quite a few throwaways. Funny thing though, it always seems to go faster and better the second time around.

 

Mike

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Superb execution Mike. You are another hard act to follow. And thanks for the tip on the sanding forms and paper. I am always fashioning up homemade ones that are barely adequate.

Joe

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On 12/31/2019 at 1:54 PM, Stuntflyer said:

Hello and a Happy New year to everyone!

 

I've been making some progress on the hull planking. The last two belts on the starboard side minus one strake are done. As tempting as it was to add the last strake I knew that I would still need a clamping area to adhere to when I start again on the port side. Clamping against the keel doesn't work since the angle of the clamp would pull the plank up and away from the bulkhead. Moving the clamp down five strakes changes the angle of the clamp just enough to hold the plank tight against the bulkhead.

_DSC9408.thumb.jpg.13ec22535adbd4d25069e50127ddf7e2.jpg

I've added a few photos showing the planking detail both fore and aft.

Winchelsea_9403.thumb.jpg.378833401ceb727e6c893507e0b1f6da.jpg

Winchelsea_9404.thumb.jpg.f79bcc3d0f42edcb0c39b6de110aab57.jpg

 

All of the sanding so far has been done with Soft Sanders. They are hard foam shapes that you wrap with adhesive backed sandpaper which is supplied by the company. The sandpaper lasts forever it seems. I am using 180 and 320 grit. http://www.softsanders.com/products/wood. I find that these two shapes work well. I cut them into 3" to 5" lengths. They conform to the hull shape allowing for a smooth transition when sanding.

softsander.jpg.09b8c6dee8f1c8cbf9b32d4fa1661b57.jpg

Mike

 

I bought a set of these. Best sanding solution I've seen. Thanks for the link, you're work is inspiring . These different build threads are really useful in avoiding traps and scraps...

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It was seven months ago that I first started to plank the hull below the wales. I'm happy to say that it is now all done. The last few days were spent sanding out the hull planking. I find that I can see dips, rises and other types of fluctuations better when the lights are off and I just use the daylight coming through the window. Sounds crazy, but it really accentuates things better than my indoor lighting. I added the stern post as well. No finish has been applied though that will be done as soon as I re-paint any scuffed areas on the wales and cleanup the keel and knee with a light sanding.

 

Winchelsea_9438.thumb.jpg.1c83f86e2af454ebf8669cdb0fcbc920.jpgWinchelsea_9436.thumb.jpg.e3546ac2dbfea5086acebad4a1c00858.jpg

Mike

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Nice work Mike !  Now that it may be finally thawing here - I can start fairing my hull and hope my planking turns out nearly as good as yours...

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Mike ....all that time was so well spent.   Your hull looks great.   Taking your time always pays off in the end.   Can you post a photo of the entire hull as well?

 

Chuck

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Mike, that is an increadable example of patience an accuracy. Your Winni will be an extraordinary model, once completed!

Matthias

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Posted (edited)

I managed to get a coat of Wipe-on-Poly on the hull.

winchelsea_9440.thumb.jpg.63254391a6da92edff4d768cd01ae12c.jpgI did not have the friezes, that are now available, when I originally planked the lower counter. After adding the transom template I placed the friezes to see how they would align with the upper and lower counters. The lower counter frieze didn't align well at all. There was just too much wood showing below the frieze. The fix was rather easy to do, however. I used the frieze to guide me in reshaping the upper plank on the lower counter. So, my suggestion is to use the provided friezes and check things out earlier rather than later.

_DSC9470.thumb.jpg.9e849c77e60de804da2627233e5f8da7.jpg

Here is the result and as you can see there was quite a bit of wood that had to be removed, about 3/32". Once that was done I added the upper counter planking.

_DSC9471.thumb.jpg.0c306cc588387c333a6a728749638e35.jpg

I added the outer window doubler to the inside of the transom template. This is a very, very tricky piece to make. I spent a lot of time finessing the angles for it to fit properly. You want the inside lip for the window to be very close to equal all around. Next, I added the 1/16" doublers to the inside of the upper counter. I then angled the upper counter planking, but not before first checking to make sure that the upper counter frieze was aligning properly with the angle. You can do this by drawing a line on the other side of the counter which mirrors the line on the inside.

Winchelsea_9472.jpg.dae6c825862bb918961d9189cf2794a7.jpg

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Looking great Mike.   Yes the friezes for the lower and upper counter are a great way to check the curves.  They will also help you get a consistent width for the upper counter.  In Mike's photo below....the space between the two friezes is where the 1/8" wide molding will go.  So align the upper counter frieze with the bottom of the transom and that should leave 1/8" between the lower counter frieze.  Perfect!!!!

_DSC9470.jpg

 

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Posted (edited)

I think Mike used two layers  for the wales (see post #121 - page 5).

It seems to me in 2 stages: first the upper 3 strakes then finally the last strake once the first strake below the wale was in (the strake which included the drop plank) - post #133

But Mike can confirm my answer.

 

Edited by JpR62

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You do a wonderful job on this build, Mike! It is a pleasure to follow!

 

Thomas

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Thank you for sharing this latest tip Mike. You make the road ahead less difficult!

Joe

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Posted (edited)

Over the weekend I added the 1/64" x 3/16"  boxwood  strips to the top edge of the transom. This hides the seam created by the transom fillers and the transom template. The arrow shows the area where I filed away about 1/64" from the top edge of the transom before adding the strip. This helps to maintain the same profile after the strip was added.

Winchelsea_9479.thumb.jpg.e2e80090342bbb135e8f8701ad791d2e.jpg

A while back I did a google search looking for a way to remove laser char and found that GOJO is a product that is often used. On larger wood pieces where the char layer is thicker, I found that a very light scraping or sanding before using the cleaner with a pipe brush gives a good result. With some trepidation, I tried using it on a gallery window for the Winnie. Using a soft tooth brush, I just kept massaging the wood gently for a few minutes. The windows was then rinsed in cold water and placed between layers of paper towel on a flat surface and weighted until dry. The result isn't perfect, but overall certainly better than before. I would imagine that those building with softer wood products like Yellow Cedar wouln't need to go though the process of removing char at all.

winchelsea_9475.jpg.beb56a6e17b8c5f1225597f8f23c8dc4.jpg

Winchelsea_9477.thumb.jpg.bfb4d77391f5a525fdf9bc8f2553f292.jpg

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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