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bigcreekdad

What brand of #11 blades do you use

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I bought a 100 pack of #11 blades a couple years ago. I did not keep the outer package cover so I don't know the brand. They are plenty sharp when new, but dull quickly and the tips brea with ease. 

 

Is this just common, or are some better than others?

 

 

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I use Swann-Morton #25a blades.  They are a lot cheaper if you get the non-sterilized blades.  Have found them on both Amazon and ebay

You might want to get a plastic handle like this (just an example) https://www.amazon.com/OdontoMed2011®-SCALPEL-PLASTIC-VETERINARY-INSTRUMENTS/dp/B01EC46Q52/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1511647956&sr=8-9&keywords=scalpel+handle+4

Kurt

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Just checked out Amazon for this purpose and there are options, look into the reviews and do not read the 4 or 5 star ratings , read the 2 or 1 and base your purchase on that.

Prices are good all over board so it wouldn't be to hard to get some for trial purpose.

Check out surgical tools as they can be useful for our building adventures.

 

Edit: best part for us, even though you buy a 100 pack for some dollars they will last a long time as we can use them over and over again. And not dispose after one usage.:D

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Switched to scalpel blades for cutting based on multiple advices on MSW, and never look back.

Though Excel blade #10 is just perfect for scraping! Just the right profile and stiffness. Lasts forever for scraping, no nicks. I have a feeling that after scraping in one direction there is a burr on the edge of the blade - then you just scrape in another direction and it works great :) Alternating directions also moves the burr from one side to another.

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Few cautions with surgical blades.  They are extremely sharp, and were designed for operating on flesh, not cutting wood.  They are brittle and break much more easily when forced than exacto type blades.  Be gentle with them. 

 

Also, be very careful when changing the blades in the scalpel handle.  The attachment is different than a hobby knife holder, and takes some getting used to.  Would strongly suggest getting a hemostat or other small surgical clamp to use when changing blades so you don't cut yourself.  There are some blade removal tools, but I haven't tried them.

 

I use #10, #11, and #15 blades.  Rather than swapping out blades when I need a different shape like I used to do with my old exacto knives, I got a couple of handles - you can get them for $3-4 each, much less than needing sutures.

 

Dave

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Swan-Morton (non sterilized)  carton of 100 will last a VERY long time.  I've had no problems using them in an X-acto holder.  If there is any question of sharpness after some usage, replace the blade.  

Maury

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I've been using Swann-Morton #26 unsterilised blades for donkeys years,also use the #21 and #25's occasionally. Much prefer the larger size of these blades to small blades. Incidentally,I just use my fingers to change these blades and have never cut myself doing so. To remove,I hook a thumbnail under the end,lift then push forward a bit and slide blade off the handle by gripping the back. To replace,grip the back then slide new blade on 'til it clicks in place. That's how I've always done it without injury. 

 

Dave :dancetl6:

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I switched to surgical blades a while back and I really like them. Got a few handles to keep from swapping the common types. Of the hobby blades, Excel over Xacto, better grade of steel for a bit longer edge. I've taken to stropping all my blades every few cuts to keep a keen edge.

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I have a variety of surgical blades which are very sharp but brittle. I use some universal plastic-metal holders that came with a cheap set and hold the blades just fine. However, I lately use more the very common knives with retractable blades that you can snap off a section. I have a few 9 mm and a couple 18 mm ones and I buy blades in packs of 10. I find them less sharp but I can cut paper, wood and metal and somehow are easier to keep on the line I intend to cut. Since I got a 4mm chisel, I find I use it also quite a lot. 

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Hi- 

I recently bought the Swann-Morton scalpel package on Amazon (below).  I received 100 no. 11 blades, a blade remover, a handle, and most importantly, needle pliers (similar to a hemostat) for handling the insertion of the blades.  I’m quite happy with the purchase.

 

Best, 

John

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DNW2D9S/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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Anybody contemplating using scalpel blades should consider getting a beefier handle than the stamped metal handles sold for surgery as there is little force used in surgical procedures whereas we tend to exert a bit more force and using the surgical handles gets old real quick.  Borrowed one of those from my wife quickly gave it back and bought the ones shown below.  I use the metal one for fine work and the red one for less critical stuff.  When the metal handle needs a new blade the blade in the red handle is thrown away and it gets the used blade from the metal handle.  The swapped blade is still plenty sharp.  Stropping is routine for blades in my shop.  I still have a bunch of Xacto blades/handles but use the scalpel blades most.

 

Each of the handles below cost less than $7.00 each with the red plastic one costing more than the metal one!    Both were obtained from ebay (with free shipping - the only way I buy on ebay).

 

Kurt

scalpals  small file.jpg

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I used scalpels for years to cut moulds and had a variety of handles.  I found the best fit of the snap on handles was in using the Swan Morton blue handle.  I also used a "screw on" handle but can't remember the name.  It held the blade the best but was round and tended to roll on the table.  If I can find it I will take a picture.

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JohnLea I found the best solution for rolling blade handles was to tape a small scrap (i.e. broken toothpick or the like) to the handle opposite the sharp side of the blade. Prevents the handle from rolling and keeps fingers away from the pointy bits 

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For a safer more robust, durable scalpel type look up the Swann-Morton 'Supatool'. The blade fits into 2 part handle which closes with a screw. A wide range of blades are available. The surgical scalpels have their uses but the 'Supatool' is much more appropriate for general model work.

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