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Heritage 46 Yacht by drobinson02199 - FINISHED - Amati - Scale 1:20 - SMALL


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Before getting to the model itself, I revamped my model building space.  The rolling chair was gouging a hole in the concrete floor, and all of my supplies were in boxes and bags scattered on the floor around my work table.

 

So I found some industrial plastic tiles on the internet (they just interlock and lay down -- no adhesion so easy to remove).  The nice thing about them is that I can replace individual tiles if the chair eventually chews some of these up, or they get too groady.

 

Then steel shelving to hold all the "stuff".  See attached picture.  Now I'm ready for this model.

 

This is the Amati Grand Banks, and I'm not sure if there has been a build log done on this one before.  See picture of the box cover.

 

I picked this one to create some variety from the historical ships, some relief from rigging after the Revenge, and finally because it's Amati.  I'm getting the sense that their kits stand a head above others, at least the manufacturers I have tried (AL, Bluejacket, Constructo, Dumas).

 

There's a "what's in the box" picture, and the usual laser cut sheets, wood, and boxed parts are there.  But this one has a pre-formed fiberglass hull, because it can be built for R/C operation.  I'm not going to do that.  The hull is REALLY thick and solid (compared to the Dumas Mt. Washington, which was a thinner plastic and also R/C adaptable).

 

Finally, there is a very well-illustrated manual.  See pic.  Plus a number of charts to go up on the wall.

 

So I'm looking forward to this one, and because it's not the usual double-plank construction, I'm expecting some new twists.

 

Regards,

David

 

 

Box Contents.jpg

Box Cover.jpg

Workshop.jpg

Manual.jpg

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Here's the first part of the superstructure.  It fits into the molded hull, and I've looked at the manual and it's built up and finished off the hull.  Also made to be removable for R/C purposes.

 

A few build points:

  • Frames 6 and 7 are reversed in the drawings of the laser cut sheets, but it's easy to figure out because of the way they fit.
  • The frames you see are MDF, and Amati put a note with the manual saying that they have substituted MDF for plywood for 5mm laser cut pieces, because it doesn't chip and works better.  Having worked with both ply and MDF I tend to agree, but I have seen some debates about MDF on the forums here.
  • The other thing is that the drawings showing what part is on what laser cut board require some interpretation.  For example, what looks like one board with three square areas of laser cut is really two separate boards, and on the one with two areas one of them is inverted -- but it's pretty easy to figure out.

More to come.

 

Regards,

David

Frame Structure.jpg

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The basic frame of the superstructure is done.  It fits into the fiberglass hull, but isn't glued in.  It remains removable for R/C access.  Since I'm not going to do R/C, when the boat is done I'll probably glue it down.  But until completion, it will stay removable.

 

The fit of these parts is really marvelous.  So far, a really nice kit from Amati.

 

Regards,

David

Basic Superstructure Frame.jpg

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What you see is the result of a dry fit (called for in the manual) to ensure that the sides fit properly and are sanded flush with the stern.  But it gives a good sense of what the boat will look like.

 

The interior of this boat has a very high level of finish -- note the mahogany interior sides, which should look really nice when varnished.

 

I also popped it onto the hull to get a sense of how it all fits together.  There is another structure that fits on top of the center structure you see.  By the way, the hull will eventually be wood-planked before it's painted.

 

Regards,

David

Dry Fit #1.jpg

Mahogany Interior.jpg

Dry Fit Mounted.jpg

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Here's the full superstructure with the flying bridge added and some parts painted.  Note that the sides are back off.

 

The flying bridge is made to be removable so that you can see into the interior of the main cabin.  The panels you see in the second picture are mahogany, which gives an idea of the finish level of the interior.  The rest of the interior is made up by a lot of small pieces of cabinetry (all in mahogany) and some cushioned seats.   Interior deck is "carpeted" (decorated heavy paper).

 

So I have to build a lot of "doll house" furniture now.

 

I'm enjoying this one. It's very different from others I have built.

 

Regards,

David

Structures Painted White.jpg

First Interior Finish.jpg

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Forgot to mention in my previous post:  there's an error in the manual.  In the second picture above, where you see the curved extension come to rest on one of two stub posts:  the manual calls for those to be part 77, but that clearly doesn't fit, and in later pictures it morphs into the part you see here.  Took some looking ahead to suss it out.

 

I'm not sure part 77 is ever used, although it's marked as a "sofa part".  We'll see.

 

Regards,

David

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I have now finished the main cabin furniture and cabinetry.  In the pics below, the superstructure is dry fitted into the hull, but the sides aren't on yet.

 

Several views -- almost all of what you see is mahogany.  I particularly like the instrument panel and controls.

 

More when I get the sides on (which are also mahogany on the inside).

 

Regards,

David

Main Cabin 1.jpg

Main Cabin 2.jpg

Main Cabin 3.jpg

Instrument Panel.jpg

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I ran into a problem after the last step.  In the first picture below, you can see the beam that was added to the transom.  Picture 2 shows that it sticks up above the flying bridge support bracket in front.  That left the flying bridge tilted up and not fitting flat.  The small instruments precluded sanding that beam down.

 

So the solution was to cut a slot in the base of the flying bridge.  You can't see those little instruments when the bridge is mounted anyway, so having them go partway up into the slot is no big deal.  Now the flying bridge sits flat again.

 

Regards,

David

 

Transom Beam.jpg

Transom 2.jpg

Cutout.jpg

Sits Flat.jpg

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Finished the sides and mounted them on the boat.  The first picture shows that with the superstructure off the hull.  Note that there are moldings at all the deck and side joins that I haven't installed yet.  There's a detail picture of the vents.

 

Nice touch is the side curtains.  The third picture shows how they are installed on the sides from the rear, and then there's a closeup of how they look from the front.

 

Finally, there's a picture of the superstructure mounted on the hull, with the flying bridge mounted on top.  The flying bridge will get a significant amount of finishing, but I'm not quite at that step yet.

 

Regards,

David

 

Sides Up 1.jpg

Vents.jpg

Curtains Backstage.jpg

Curtains.jpg

Sides on Hull w Fly Bridge.jpg

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Finishing off the main cabin interior.  First picture shows the curtains up, as well as the magazines and maps.  Closeups of those follow -- they are real mag covers and real maps, all reduced to miniature in the kit.

 

A build tip:  the instructions call for the curtain cloth to be sized with diluted PVA glue to give them some body, but that didn't do the trick -- after folding they were too floppy.  So after folding and tying, I used hair spray to stiffen them.

 

The bow picture shows the moldings covering the join points.

 

The final picture shows the molding reversed to act as a flashing where the sides meet the hull deck.  A build point:  looking ahead in the instructions, the hull deck is made up of a 1mm frame and 1mm planks, so when installing that flange, I needed to make sure I had 2mm underneath it all the way around. 

 

Regards,

David 

Curtains.jpg

Magazines.jpg

Maps.jpg

Front molding.jpg

Deck Molding 1.jpg

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I'm about to begin work on the flying bridge, and with the interior cabin finished, I realized that while the flying bridge is removable to view the interior cabin, it might be good to light the interior.

 

I can do that by attaching led's to the bottom of the flying bridge.  There is room to make a cavity for the battery and switch, which you can see in the pics below.  Would have bee much harder to do this if all of the railings and finish had been applied to the flying bridge.

 

Regards,

David

Flying Bridge.jpg

Cavity.jpg

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This will be my last progress report for two weeks as I'm going away with my wife from cold Boston to a sunny place.

 

I have now planked the flying bridge deck.  In this picture I also dry-fitted the main railings, although they won't go on permanently until the flying bridge furniture and fixtures are done.  Note that the forward railing is missing a stanchion on the starboard side -- I broke it while fitting the railing and will need to glue it back on when the railing is permanently mounted.  (This despite a manual warning to be careful as the forward railing is delicate).

 

When drilling the holes for the forward railing, when you hold the railing over the bridge, it looks like the positioning of the first two holes as specified in the manual is a mistake, but it turns out that the angle of the stanchions makes for deceptive positioning.  So followed the manual and it worked.

 

Then I have also made and installed the windshield wipers, which I think are very realistic-looking.

 

More building later in February when I return.

 

Regards,

David

Flying Bridge Deck & Rails.jpg

Windshield Wipers.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Back from vacation, and I fabricated some interior lighting for the boat (not part of the kit).  Pics below show a full shot of the boat without, and then with, the lights on.  Then three interiors taken through the windows with the lights on.

 

Finally, the light and battery assembly on the bottom of the removable flying bridge.

 

Regards,

David

Lights Out.jpg

Lights On.jpg

Interior Lighted 1.jpg

Interior Lighted 2.jpg

Interior Lighted 3.jpg

Lighting Assembly.jpg

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I finished the flying bridge fixtures and details today.  Pictures below show the full flying bridge, the controls that duplicate the ones in the main cabin (as they would on the real boat), and the rear steps and railings.  The flying bridge is still fully removable to see the main cabin interior.

 

There is a closeup of the corner couch.  The shorter seatback cushion was too long in the kit, so I had to undo the upholstery at one end, shorten it, and then re-cut and redo the upholstery.  I think it came out well, and now I have another possible vocation in case my day job doesn't work out.  :D

 

Regards,

David

Full Flying Bridge.jpg

Flying Bridge Controls.jpg

Railings.jpg

Upholstery.jpg

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Chris:

 

Thanks -- I am really enjoying this one.

 

I'm not really close to the end.  Still a lot of detail to do:  example is the bow railing I just installed on one side -- shown in the picture below.  There is also more detail on the boat, the planking of the hull exterior and painting, hull deck planking, and other finish. I'd say I'm somewhere between 1/2 and 2/3 done.

 

Regards,

David

Bow Railing.jpg

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I haven't finished all of the detail work on the superstructure, but the manual wants me to turn to the hull now.  

 

It gets planked and painted.  Interestingly, the hull planking is laser cut to fit.  See picture below.  I think they did this because if you look at the Amati stock photo that follows it, the plank lines are meant to stand out after painting and be smooth and even, so that requires precise plank shapes.  So no sideways plank bending!!!  :P

 

Now I just need to not screw it up.

 

Regards,

David

 

Hull Planking Sheet.jpg

full_1607.jpg

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hey cool, that ready made to fit planking is a bonus (assuming it fits like the stock photo)??? this appears to be an extremely well constructed kit however so I'd imagine you should have no problems. are you going to run the same color scheme as the stock pic? I must say I really like the blue. I will definitely get this kit one day! I reckon it looks fantastic does it have a name plate on the stern area? could you maybe give it one if it doesn't? this is really coming along a treat dave!

 

cheers

 

chris 

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