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Tim Moore

HMS Bounty by Tim Moore - Artesania Latina - 1/48 - with exposed interior

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Hi all. Recently completed the Miss Severn by Legend model boats, but can't yet get it on the water seeing as it is winter here in the great white north. My winter+ project is the Latina 1/48 Bounty. Should look good beside Cook's Endeavour on my display shelves when complete. It's a single plank on frame design with an exposed interior below decks rather than the usual double planking on plywood bulkheads. Created a simple plywood building slip to ensure the hull stays true during construction, and decided to paint the ribs maritime white to provide contrast with all the timber and flotsam that will be on display below decks. Not the walnut finish suggested by Latina but I've seen a museum model done this way and it was a beauty.

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Lower decks and hold well fabricated and installed. Cut the planking into 6" sections to replicate a 25' plank at 1/48 scale. Frame seems a little more fragile than I'd like but hopefully will be more stable when the upper beams and deck are in place.

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I started this build a couple of weeks ago and am just catching up with my posts as I just joined the modelshipworld community....from here on I'll try and keep it current in real time. Finished the lower deck assemblies, cabins and some stairs. The Latina instructions arent perfect but there's enough information to get the job done. Just the main deck to do and then structure is complete and it's on to the dreaded planking phase...mostly 2x5 walnut planking it looks like, but some pretty aggressive curvature is required. If anybody has any genius advice on a preferred method of bending planks please do pass on, I'd appreciate knowing how you have done it and any tips. I've done a few but always seems a struggle to avoid breakage.

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Looks like you are off to a good start, I have not built the Bounty so I will let others help with the planking question. Welcome to MSW

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Thanks! Just finished the basic structure, main deck and added the stern architecture, now it's on to filing it all down to get the right hull geometry for planking. The deck nails provided in the kit are brutal - clown pins, totally out of scale. Used a simplified four butt shift pattern due to the size of them, but still not really happy with the result.

 

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Having read through the "instructions" (I use the term loosely) on this kit a little further it is apparent I may have been a tad optimistic about them. As you get further into the build, they get more abbreviated, semi intelligible and barely useful, as if the writer lost interest in the job. Thankfully though there are decent plans, a good parts list and photos to refer to. 

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1 hour ago, Tim Moore said:

Thanks! Just finished the basic structure, main deck and added the stern architecture, now it's on to filing it all down to get the right hull geometry for planking. The deck nails provided in the kit are brutal - clown pins, totally out of scale. Used a simplified four butt shift pattern due to the size of them, but still not really happy with the result.

 

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I build a plywood form about 3/4 of an inch thick that matches the curvature of the bow, you should be able to trace this from plans, I then epoxy this to a plywood base. I only steam bend so I clamp the planks to the nose of the frame and apply steam to the plank using a stem cleaner with nozzle. Steam it and began bending right behind the first clamp. Add another clamp and so forth then let them dry and remove from form.  I can usually do 4 at a time. 8 if you do a Port and Starboard form. System works well

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Question for any experts.....I've installed some bow and stern blocking and am ready to start planking this beast....wouldn't it be better to install the keel, stem and stern post before planking rather than trying to fit it after? The AL instructions leave it till later but I'm inclined to plank up to an already fitted keel etc... Is there a best practice on this point?

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Hi Tim.

Welcome to MSW.

First tip is to read through other build logs here on MSW. There are plenty of them and all the best tips and methods have been used.

I like your building frame.. Nice and sturdy. 

 

Regards Antony.

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I'm no expert but it sure makes more sense to me to have the keel, etc. in place. One thought, are they assuming that you can use the stem and sternpost to hide the ends of the planking? If you add them first, you have to get the planks perfectly butted up against them (especially at the stem), whereas without them you in theory can be a bit sloppy and fit the stem over the ends to hide the imperfections. Personally I think I'd fit them first and just do the planking job right.

 

My preferred planking method is to soak the plank, fit it in place on the model, use a hairdryer on high to heat and dry it, adjust as needed by sanding or shaping, then attach. A hull shape like that, I think you're likely to need some serious tapering and probably some drop planks to avoid too much edge bending. Again, no expert, but I've done a few hulls of different shapes and you're better off not trying to force too much lateral curvature in planks.

 

I'm looking forward to following this build, as I wish more manufacturers would do "interior" kits like this that are more interesting and educational than just the hull.

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Epoxied the stem and keel and planking underway...made a jig as suggested from 3/4 ply, and after a short soak the 2mm basswood was easily moulded. After they dried a few dots of gel superglue, 3 frames at a time and a few seconds of finger pressure to fix the planks. Tapered the planks progressively to the bow, backfiled the top edge and did the graphite treatment before gluing.

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Hi Tim.

Yea nice bending jig.

And your base board is the right width allowing you to place the model on her side to do the planking. (Never thought about doing this before)

 And a very good start on the planking. Because you graphite'ed the joints does this mean you are not painting the hull?.

Now you have the first 4 planks in place it's time to think about getting the planks to lay with out the lateral curve.

Some nice tutorials on MSW. Worth a look. The idea is to lay the planks without too much lateral bending.

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Image taken from http://modelshipworldforum.com/ship-model-framing-and-planking-articles.php

 

All the best with your build Tim.

 

Regards Antony.

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Thanks Antony. Keen on getting back to Blighty and visiting Devon some day, I'm from Preston originally before we emigrated to Canada. I'm not sure if I want to paint the hull yet so decided to do the graphite treatment in case not. Just completed some nailing which turned out pretty well once I worked out a system. Going off for a holiday shortly and will tackle the main planking in walnut when I get back.

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Hello... I'm new to ship modeling and just following along on your build.  You had mentioned a graphite treatment.  I tried looking that up and didn't find that term.  What is the graphite treatment?  Sorry if this is a basic question.  Rob

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Hi Rob...I use a soft pencil (5b or anything like that) and rub it along the edge of both sides of the plank just before gluing it on. Looks a bit messy when you do it but once you give it a light sanding it gives definition to the planking or decking, and replicates the caulking between boards in the real thing.

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Ahh... Tim, perfect.  Now I understand the question on painting versus not.  I'd assume a stain will reveal the contrast.

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Hi Tim, looking good so far and good luck with it going forward as I'll look forward to following your build.

 

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I'm back! Sorry for that ridiculously long hiatus but had to shelve the Bounty temporarily while I completed some bigger builds.... one of which was building a studio attached to the house, so now I have a great workspace to build model ships etc. Anyway I digress, back to the dirty job of hull planking. My own technique is to lay it on in sections, reducing width at the bow. I pre bend the planks for the bow curve using a steamer and clamps, and then glue and nail working back to the stern when dry. For the stern I steam the plank in situ to create rubber wood and clamp it into its final location. 

I use plain carpenters glue, snip the heads off the nails and file the top flat, then set nail on the planks with a small hammer. The "instructions" called for nailing and then filing the heads off after the fact which I can only imagine would lead to a dogs breakfast in my hands, if it is even doable. Looks a bit rough but will look beauty after sanding. 

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Planking complete on the closed side without any real issues, not sanded yet. Regrettably not nearly enough brass nails provided in the kit to do even half the job according to the recommended nail pattern. Ran out a couple of days ago and trying to economically source some 10mm pins so I can continue, no luck so far.

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Latina is sending me the missing nails from the kit - after checking parts list there were supposed to be 1500 but there were only about 500. It'll be interesting to see how long to get a package Barcelona - Toronto.

So while I wait for those to complete nailing the hull planking I've decided to use the delay to revisit the balls up I made of the nails on the deck. Filed down the heads (easier said than done) and sanded it all down. Much happier with it now, although I wish I had chucked the wafer thin 0.5 mm basswood in the kit and found some better quality 1mm deck material to work with from the get go. I find basswood usually looks lousy and blotchy when stained, even after using wood conditioner, so I guess it'll have to just be satin poly? If anyone has a suggestion otherwise I'd appreciate hearing. Just looks a bit light for authenticity.  

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Thanks Wallace... 

the rowboat from Spain with the missing nails must be running into trouble, so I've decided to just get on with it using krazy glue instead of my preferred white glue and nail method. finished the planking, did a little more planking on the 'open' side than the plans suggests, because it looked a little arbitrary and unfinished to me. The frames are painted white for contrast to make the interior structure a little more visible. Just finishing the wales, which I've stained ebony. When the nails eventually arrive (he says, hopefully) I'll go back and install them and sand and finish the hull. In the meantime I'll proceed with the bulwarks etc. Pondering what to do for painting, I'm presently leaning towards leaving the natural walnut below as it's pretty dark when varnished, ebony stained trim, natural basswood or light stain on the upper with red interior bulwarks perhaps. 

Going to be a decent sized model. 

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Installation of the stern timbers and waterway isn't illustrated very well on the plans but is explained somewhat in the text. I drilled the base of the timbers and inserted a small chunk of dowel to act as a tenon to fix them into the deck, and then reinforced with the waterway both sides and between. This should give them enough rigidity to build up the upper planking at the proper angle while staying true. 

Found three separate historical paintings of the bounty that appear pretty consistent, so I'm going to proceed according to those in terms of my colour scheme.

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Really like the waterway/stanchion solution.   If you don't mind me stealing this idea I will be adding it to my box of tricks to use in the future.

 

Sam.

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Very interesting. This is how I intend to do the bulwark stanchions on my Scottish Maid, when I get that far. I will be following your progress keenly. Its surprising that this is the first log I have seen where someone is trying this technique.

 

It looks like you are making a very good job of this. Until I spotted this log I was unaware that this kit, with all the internal detail was available. It makes for a very interesting model and one I have added to my list.

 

Glenn

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