Jump to content
rafine

Prince de Neufchatel by rafine - Model Shipways - 1:64

Recommended Posts

I was just able to preview the first 40 pages on books.google.com you can buy the e-book for $14.39.  It really is amazing what he's done with this ship.  There is a lot more detail than in the Model Shipways kit and it's about 1/4 the size.

 

Amazon.ca has one for $55 Canadian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been moving along in the "less fun" portion of the build. This most recent work involved the initial strake of planking, representing the position of the wale. This sets the position of the bulwark/ gunport pieces. I decided, after considerable internal debate, to go with the ply pieces rather than building up the gunport framing. Although they were a pain to deal with, I'm pleased with the result, and I'm doubtful that it would have been better or easier to do it the other way.

 

The first step was to set the upper line of the bulwarks on the bulkhead extensions. Next the lower line was drawn in on the gunport pieces while they were clamped in place.Lastly, the lower portion was trimmed and the pieces finally fitted. I had to wet heat bend  the forward end to get a smooth fit. Before mounting the ply pieces, I glued the laser cut port frames in place and cut and sanded the ports to fit the frames (thanks David Lester for the sequence). After mounting the bulwark pieces, it was necessary to trim down the bulkhead extensions to 1/16". This was tedious work, made a little easier by the fact the bulkheads are basswood, rather than ply. The bulwark pieces were then glued in place, using clamps. The last step was to add 1/16" square framing pieces for further support of the planking.

 

 Finally, I added the ply transom piece, following the same steps as used for the bulwark pieces.

 

Bob

fullsizeoutput_7fd.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_7fe.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_7ff.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_800.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_801.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_802.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's taken a bit, but I've done the planking of the lower hull. A couple of general comments: Since the lower hull will be painted in part and the remainder covered in copper sheathing, the principal concern was to get a smooth, even surface; despite this, I still decided to do the planking in a prototypical pattern, using scale length planks.This meant tapering the planks at  the bow, prebending each plank and beveling the mating edge of  each plank to obtain tight joints. I was able to use only two stealers at the stern and no drop planks at the bow. I've also made a decision that although the kit calls for double planking, I'm not going to do a second layer. I see no reason to do so because of  the copper and paint.The only exception will be to build up the wales.

 

I'm not sure what I'm going to next, because I'm waiting for the imminent reopening of Crown Timberyard to get the boxwood that I need for the upper hull and inner bulwark planking.

 

Bob

fullsizeoutput_809.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_808.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_806.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_805.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_807.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_804.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bob -- That's tidy planking.  Every time I check in on your progress, I hear myself saying, ah, so that's how the Prince is supposed to look!  :rolleyes:

 

-- And I think a lot of us are eagerly awaiting the re-opening of Crown.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hanks so much Joshua, David,Martin,Daveandc the "likes". Much appreciated.

 

Joshua,I have no idea if mine is right.It was really just a guess.

 

David, what are going to use for the copper?

 

Martin, hopefully next week.

 

Dave, I bought the e-book for $14. 

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, rafine said:

It's taken a bit, but I've done the planking of the lower hull. A couple of general comments: Since the lower hull will be painted in part and the remainder covered in copper sheathing, the principal concern was to get a smooth, even surface; despite this, I still decided to do the planking in a prototypical pattern, using scale length planks.This meant tapering the planks at  the bow, prebending each plank and beveling the mating edge of  each plank to obtain tight joints. I was able to use only two stealers at the stern and no drop planks at the bow. I've also made a decision that although the kit calls for double planking, I'm not going to do a second layer. I see no reason to do so because of  the copper and paint.The only exception will be to build up the wales.

 

I'm not sure what I'm going to next, because I'm waiting for the imminent reopening of Crown Timberyard to get the boxwood that I need for the upper hull and inner bulwark planking.

 

Bob

fullsizeoutput_809.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_808.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_806.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_805.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_807.jpeg

fullsizeoutput_804.jpeg

Wow!   that hull looks real nice  so smooth   she is coming along so well.

 

OC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, I'm going to do the same thing for the copper as I did for my Constitution. I'm using that self-adhesive copper foil tape, cutting it into individual plates, and creating rivet heads with a ponce wheel. It worked quite well and I got a good result. The only problem is deciding when to do it. You can't do too much to the deck and upper hull first, because then you can't easily invert the hull without it resulting in damage. On the other hand, the copper tape is very fragile and will not tolerate much handling once it's applied. I think I'll check back on my Bob Hunt practicum for the Constitution to see at what point in the build he recommended doing it and use that as a guide.

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the hull looks fantastic!   I've asked myself the same question about double planking....I've only done it to one model.  it seems a waste of planking,  especially if done as well as yours ;)   .....and of course,  with the use of copper and paint.   really nice....well done!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, rafine said:

Thanks so much OC, Enemeink ,Thomas, David,Denis and the "likes".

 

David, I' m also leaning toward using the copper tape, which I've used before, but I might try the Caldercraft plates. j just have no idea how many I would need.

 

Bob

 

Bob,

 

I used the tape. I cut out 1,800 plates, but only applied 840 to the hull of my PdN (I counted them for you). Of course, some were discarded because I was not happy with how they turned out (blemishes or how they laid on the hull). If I was to give you a round number, I would suggest planning for a 1,000.

 

- Tim

Edited by Tim I.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...