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New member with a question about shipping models


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Hello from the southwest US,

 

I am new to this forum, and have a question I am hoping someone can point me in the right direction.  My father completed 2 beautiful model ships, the H.M.S Victory, and the Adler von Lubeck.  He has passed away, and I now live over 2000 miles from where the models are.  I have admired these models since childhood, as my father finished them during my youth.  I can remember him soaking the wooden planks, and using boxes of toothpicks and hand drilling the holes to place them as pegs along each plank.  I can remember him drawing the twine through beeswax and tying all the rigging by hand or with tweezers.  I would really like to have them in my home, but I have no idea how to go about shipping such delicate models, or if the prospect would be cost prohibitive.   I would need to ship them from the northeast US to the southwest US.   Are there any companies that specialize in something like this?  I can't imagine trusting them to just anyone, and would expect they would need very specialized packing and transport.  Any advise or input would be greatly appreciated, I really have no idea where to look.

Thank you in advance,

Chris

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Welcome to MSW CJ2S. Something else you will want to be asking is, is there anybody in (nameyourtown) that works on models that might be willing to fix what will hopefully be just a few small breaks? Unless you drive the models home yourself - and maybe not even then - it is inevitable that things will break off, fall off, come untied, scratched, etc. during transport. I have things break off mine just driving 15 minutes to some show. Of course that could also be your opportunity to jump into the hobby and learn what we do here. You won't find a better group than those here to help you out.

 

Make sure you get the display case as well. Depending on your home situation - cats, kids, dust, dirt - the cover will keep the build looking pristine for years to come. You can get them made locally but they range in price from maybe $150 - $500 for one that size.  Always keep them covered.

 

BTW I agree with Chris, your dad did a wonderful job with that build.

 

Let us know what you decide.....

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13 hours ago, vossy said:

Sorry, don't know about transport in your neck of the woods, but your father really produced a beautiful model there! any chance we can see more pics of Victory and the other one?

 

Chris

 

Thank you for asking, it means a lot to me to know that others appreciate this. 

 

Here are some other pictures I have right now of the H.M.S. Victory.  I can remember him sawing bits of brass from small brass sheets with a jewelry saw, and hand drilling wooden pieces with a pin vise and rotary hand drill.  He had a free standing metal cabinet in the kitchen that he would take all his supplies and the model out of, work on the kitchen table, then place everything back in the cabinet before dinner. 

 

This model was completed by my father John R. Costa, and I can't imagine how he completed a project like this with a baby through toddler (me) in the house, and a full time job.  He worked for the Naval Underwater Warfare Center formerly called the Naval Underwater Systems Center for nearly my entire life (40+yrs).

 

Thank you to all that have replied, I will browse that other post for input.

 

Chris

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John.jpg

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  • 3 months later...

We are still searching for my father's build logs.  I know they exist, however they had a basement flood that may have resulted in losing them - but we're really hoping that didn't happen.  Also still researching shipping them, even contacted a local museum that has a couple of similar models to ask how they shipped them but haven't received an answer yet.  In the meantime I've put up a memorial site for my father with the pictures here: 

http://hmsvictory.getyourstoreonline.com/

 

Best regards to all, and thank you for the responses.

 

Chris

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If I was to have to deal with two ships that important to me I think the only way I would do it would be to fly out and rental car back with the models under my personal care. I would not be able to trust an irreplaceable model like that to anyone but the very best and I could only guess how much they would cost. The fly/drive would probably be cheaper.

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10 hours ago, lmagna said:

If I was to have to deal with two ships that important to me I think the only way I would do it would be to fly out and rental car back with the models under my personal care. I would not be able to trust an irreplaceable model like that to anyone but the very best and I could only guess how much they would cost. The fly/drive would probably be cheaper.

Thank you Lou,

 

My wife has expressed the same feelings (though she wants to use an RV for the trip - would be helpful if we owned an RV but we don't...lol..). 

 

I feel the same, however personal circumstances have made that just not possible, I'm hoping things will change and it may be come a possibility in the future, though.  With the distance involved it's also not a small trip to accomplish.  Would certainly be worth the effort to have the models in my care, and be able to admire them again though.

HMS Victory Model - a tribute to John R Costa

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CJ2S

I don't know if your limiting circumstances are financial, physical, or work related but hopefully you can figure something out. If time is not an issue you could even break it up and take it all a little slower. I was thinking a small U-Haul van but you can rent RVs too. AT least they have the advantage that you can camp in any rest stop and skip most stops for food.

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Welcome aboard mate! Very nice work. Your Dad was a skilled builder. I agree with the others. The only way to move them with some degree of safety,  is to do it yourself. You could rent a small truck from maybe Uhall and secure them with mover's blankets and ties. 

Good Luck, 

Vince P. :dancetl6:

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Unless you cannot move them carefully yourself, as these models have great family sentimental value, you should consider a professional company that specializes in moving art and museum objects. Call your local art gallery or museum to find out who they use. It will not be cheap, but they will move the models safely and fully insured.

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If however you'd have decided to do it yourself and your models are in display cases, here is what I once did with my Billing's "Norske Loeve" (this was recommended once by someone from the old "Seaways" list).

I obtained a large bag od styrofoam "popcorns" and simply gently filled out an entire case with them (built with plastic sheets, not glass, BTW. Lexan, to be precise) WITH the model inside, , making sure styrofoam fell into all crannies and corners in between the model and the case. Then, I carefully taped the case with a blue painters tape and placed everything in the trunk of my car (station wagon), laying it flat on soft blankets, and drove it to the new place.

It was however not nearly as far as yours, just a few miles, but, to my astonishement, absolutely nothing happened to the model, after complete removal of the 'popcorns'. And the roads were not as smooth as one could imagine!

You can obtain these styrofoam 'popcorns' in large bags from places like post offices or office supplies stores, like Staples or Office Depot.

 

Something to consider, besides professionals...

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I used the following to get my model of Euryalus to Switzerland.   There was MINOR damage that they had fixed to everyone's satisfaction and at no charge back to me or my client for the repair.    I have used others for long distance shipping that were chosen by the clients that worked well and one that I told to get out when he asked if he could take off the masts and rigging in order to use a smaller crate!!!   Be sure you are present when they pack it up.

 

Craters & Freighters
333 Cedar Ave
Middlesex, NJ 08846
732-56
 
Usual caveat that I have no financial or other interest in this company, just a successful experience in the past
 
Allan
 

 

 

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On 7/3/2018 at 12:17 PM, lmagna said:

CJ2S

I don't know if your limiting circumstances are financial, physical, or work related but hopefully you can figure something out. If time is not an issue you could even break it up and take it all a little slower. I was thinking a small U-Haul van but you can rent RVs too. AT least they have the advantage that you can camp in any rest stop and skip most stops for food.

Unfortunately physical, but hopeful for improvement.  My wife loves the RV trip idea.

 

On 7/3/2018 at 12:23 PM, Jack12477 said:

From what state to what state do you have to move these models ?

RI-NV  Quite a haul.

 

On 7/3/2018 at 4:26 PM, markjay said:

Beautiful craftsmanship, top of the line!

Thank you Mark, it means a lot to me to know others appreciate it as well.  I can stare at these models for quite some time, always noticing some other detail that amazes me.

 

On 7/4/2018 at 4:08 PM, pirozzi said:

Welcome aboard mate! Very nice work. Your Dad was a skilled builder. I agree with the others. The only way to move them with some degree of safety,  is to do it yourself. You could rent a small truck from maybe Uhall and secure them with mover's blankets and ties. 

Good Luck, 

Vince P. :dancetl6:

Thank you Vince, much appreciated.  The size is an issue, see my next response below.

 

On 7/5/2018 at 10:08 AM, Dziadeczek said:

If however you'd have decided to do it yourself and your models are in display cases, here is what I once did with my Billing's "Norske Loeve" (this was recommended once by someone from the old "Seaways" list).

I obtained a large bag od styrofoam "popcorns" and simply gently filled out an entire case with them (built with plastic sheets, not glass, BTW. Lexan, to be precise) WITH the model inside, , making sure styrofoam fell into all crannies and corners in between the model and the case. Then, I carefully taped the case with a blue painters tape and placed everything in the trunk of my car (station wagon), laying it flat on soft blankets, and drove it to the new place.

It was however not nearly as far as yours, just a few miles, but, to my astonishement, absolutely nothing happened to the model, after complete removal of the 'popcorns'. And the roads were not as smooth as one could imagine!

You can obtain these styrofoam 'popcorns' in large bags from places like post offices or office supplies stores, like Staples or Office Depot.

 

Something to consider, besides professionals...

This is a great idea, though I think the scale of these models is a bit deceptive in the pictures.  The case on the HMS Victory measures approx. 47"Lx34"Hx19"W.  One would not fit in a trunk or even a back seat.  Our minivan, with the rear seats removed, might be able to hold one of them only. 

 

On 7/6/2018 at 5:20 AM, allanyed said:

I used the following to get my model of Euryalus to Switzerland.   There was MINOR damage that they had fixed to everyone's satisfaction and at no charge back to me or my client for the repair.    I have used others for long distance shipping that were chosen by the clients that worked well and one that I told to get out when he asked if he could take off the masts and rigging in order to use a smaller crate!!!   Be sure you are present when they pack it up.

 

Craters & Freighters
333 Cedar Ave
Middlesex, NJ 08846
732-56
 
Usual caveat that I have no financial or other interest in this company, just a successful experience in the past
 
Allan
 

 

 

Excellent lead and resource, thank you Allan for sharing it.

 

Thank you for these responses, a lot of great folks on here.

 

Chris

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On 3/9/2018 at 3:28 PM, CJ2S said:

I can remember him sawing bits of brass from small brass sheets with a jewelry saw, and hand drilling wooden pieces with a pin vise and rotary hand drill.  He had a free standing metal cabinet in the kitchen that he would take all his supplies and the model out of, work on the kitchen table, then place everything back in the cabinet before dinner. 

 

This model was completed by my father John R. Costa, and I can't imagine how he completed a project like this with a baby through toddler (me) in the house, and a full time job. 

        Chris, I think that your father must have been very handy with those hand tools.  He probably would have made a good finish carpenter.  Do you remember what manufacturer produced the kits that he built?  It looks like he must have modified them somewhat, as most kits from back then were quite poor, and he would have needed to supply alot of his own ingenuity (something that I personally identify with) and skills to make up for it.

        Books and magazines back then on modeling were very limited.  I'm sure that there was very little in the way of instructions included with the kits back then, and the plans were probably not very complete either.  So, for him to construct such a fine looking model makes it that much more of a remarkable feat! 

        Today with all of the research tools available through the internet, forums like MSW, materials and adhesives, and the large assortment of small scale power tools available to us now,  I would have to say that we have advantages that your father could only have dreamt about.

        You are quite justified to be very proud of these accomplishments of his and to be concerned about preserving these fine models.  I certainly would be, as besides being something to remember him by, the ships appear to be finely made models of some very famous ships. (Perhaps a local museum could be persuaded to help with the shipping if you offered to donate the models to them.  Then you and many others would be able to enjoy seeing them now and in the future.)  

 

Dave

        By the way, welcome to MSW.:10_1_10:

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On 7/13/2018 at 3:38 PM, BETAQDAVE said:

        Chris, I think that your father must have been very handy with those hand tools.  He probably would have made a good finish carpenter.  Do you remember what manufacturer produced the kits that he built?  It looks like he must have modified them somewhat, as most kits from back then were quite poor, and he would have needed to supply alot of his own ingenuity (something that I personally identify with) and skills to make up for it.

        Books and magazines back then on modeling were very limited.  I'm sure that there was very little in the way of instructions included with the kits back then, and the plans were probably not very complete either.  So, for him to construct such a fine looking model makes it that much more of a remarkable feat! 

        Today with all of the research tools available through the internet, forums like MSW, materials and adhesives, and the large assortment of small scale power tools available to us now,  I would have to say that we have advantages that your father could only have dreamt about.

        You are quite justified to be very proud of these accomplishments of his and to be concerned about preserving these fine models.  I certainly would be, as besides being something to remember him by, the ships appear to be finely made models of some very famous ships. (Perhaps a local museum could be persuaded to help with the shipping if you offered to donate the models to them.  Then you and many others would be able to enjoy seeing them now and in the future.)  

 

Dave

        By the way, welcome to MSW.:10_1_10:

Dave,

 

Thank you so much for your comments - You are bringing back so many memories for me. 

 

You've hit the nail right on the head.  With my father's modeling supplies were old books on the history of the ships themselves, with notes and arrows pointing to details of the ship.  I think he got many of the details from other historic sources rather than any kit.  I will try to look back at the supplies, but the only item we could find that resembled anything like instructions were more like scale blueprints of the hull.  I think he used them to cut out some sort of template that guided the shape of the hull (sorry I don't know the proper terms for this).

 

I can remember as a child making many trips to someplace where he would buy wood and supplies.  I know most of the materials he used were not supplied in a kit, as he gathered them as he went along with building.  I can remember him buying wood planks and dowels (he still had a storage rack that he built that had squares for each size/thickness of wood dowel and plank stock that he had sorted by size/thickness).  He also had a couple of books on sailor's knots and rigging knots that he used to tie all of the rigging and netting.  I can remember him drawing the twine through a block of beeswax, then using 2 pairs of tweezers, one with a bend at the end, to manipulate the string and tie knots and rigging - most of the places are too small for fingers to fit to do the work.

 

Thank you for appreciating all this, it's still just amazing to me to think about.

 

Chris

 

HMS Victory Model - a tribute to John R Costa

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