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woodrat

Venetian round ship 13th century by woodrat - 1:32 scale - fully framed

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5 hours ago, cog said:

You have a strange building streak by keeping us in suspense ... you know what happens with cunning plans ...

Too true: The best laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain For promis'd joy

 

I will use the narrowing calculated by mezza lune  to determine length of floor for each position and build the frame using the jig. I will assemble on the building board and use ribbands to help with fairing. Like all great cunning plans, it will grow in the telling.:)

Dick

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I'll follow at a safe distance ... if you do not mind ... even if you did

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Dick,

 

If I understand your plan correctly, the word “cunning” does not do it justice.  You are in fact replicating in miniature a process that could have been used 700 or so years ago to build the real thing.  Although the original builders would not have had a jig like you show assembling frames from segments calculated from your half lune is a plasuable scenario.

 

Too few people today realize that even after the invention of the practice of lofting from a formal lines drawing c 1600’s most ships were built using some sort of rule of thumb system much of which has been lost to history.

 

Roger

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21 hours ago, Roger Pellett said:

Too few people today realize that even after the invention of the practice of lofting from a formal lines drawing c 1600’s most ships were built using some sort of rule of thumb system much of which has been lost to history.

We are having the same kind of loss nowadays print, wood construction, actually to much to mention

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On 09/07/2018 at 1:55 AM, Roger Pellett said:

 Although the original builders would not have had a jig like you show assembling frames from segments calculated from your half lune is a plasuable scenario.

 

Too few people today realize that even after the invention of the practice of lofting from a formal lines drawing c 1600’s most ships were built using some sort of rule of thumb system much of which has been lost to history.

 

Roger

Thanks, Roger and Cog.  I chose to use this jig because, to use a ruled stick or sesto at this scale, would lead to inaccuracy. This jig amounts to doing a similar method as the mediaeval shipwrights in the Arsenale of Venice would have used.

Dick

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here be shown the master-frame which is not as you would think at the midpoint of the keel but slightly forward of this. As a consequence, there are a few more frames aft than forward.

 

DSCN1557a.thumb.jpg.793a7cb7d982a7841642b3533141c7cb.jpgDSCN1556a.jpg.fc32dac0adef2b7a6c685fca7c3615e5.jpgDSCN1558a.jpg.346b4a79c9954d7a929bd67c8524810f.jpgDSCN1559a.jpg.1653542ec255936455f10a58e9442511.jpg

Edited by woodrat

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They were already looking for ways to improve on their speed, so it seems from the way their frames are placed at least ...

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On 7/17/2018 at 1:08 PM, Louie da fly said:

A very interesting framing system, Dick. Is this based on the Libro di Navigar?

 

Steven

No, I based the framing plan on the excavated wreck of Contarina 1 which is the best documented wreck found so far from the period. However the frame shape is based on Libro di Navigar.

On 7/17/2018 at 1:17 PM, cog said:

They were already looking for ways to improve on their speed, so it seems from the way their frames are placed at least ...

I think they were trying to get a compromise between the lithe, light coast-hugging lines of the galley and a more heavily built stout sea-crossing barky, but still capable of giving a pirate galley a run for its money.

Dick

Edited by woodrat

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That's a very sensible and systematic way of putting frames together to shape the hull. The Venetians were very good at this kind of thing, and your jig looks very good.

 

Steven

Edited by Louie da fly

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You started my weekend off with a smile. Looking good Dick, very nifty 

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Thanks for the comments, chaps. I have completed every fifth frame and temporarily pinned to the board. They will next be faired and ribbands applied. I will make the intervening frames once the ribbands are in place

It may be several weeks before I can get back to this as I am overseas. 😎

A jig for drilling the keel

dscn1577a.jpg.63788568452a55bfbc834eb79ff30889.jpg

 

A jig for drilling the floor

DSCN1578a.jpg.1aa402c5040109037c6bbbc084955c3d.jpg

 

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DSCN1582a.jpg.73029816ad73abf75fd7ca231471f865.jpg

See ya later

Dick

 

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This is looking very good, Dick. Precise workmanship, ingenious jigs and a fascinating and beautiful ship. I'm enjoying following this build.

 

Steven

 

Edited by Louie da fly

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Thanks Ondras and Steven. Just had time to dash off some frames. The jig certainly speeds up the process. just thinking about mediaeval building. The foothooks and top timbers could be premade elsewhere. Only the floors need be individually shaped onsite and even this would have been somewhat automated. This helps explain how the shipwrights of the Arsenale could lay down an entire galley in three or four weeks.

 

This shows the gradual narrowing of adjacent floors.

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DSCN1587a.jpg.a32b857c9a84be94a1c7363c86480d29.jpg

Dick

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Thanks chaps.

I have now completed and faired all frames between the master frame and the tail frames. They have now to be fixed to the keel . Note the card strips maintaining the space between frames. After this ribbands will be attached to the hull to properly align the frames. Only then can the bow and stern framing be made based on the ribbands.

Dick

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DSCN1596a.jpg.56bded1c25bdc4eb2cad570c64627d83.jpg

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On 11/13/2018 at 1:52 AM, michael mott said:

. What wood are you using? 

 

Michael

Michael, I haven't mentioned it because I'm not sure. I believe it is karri or marri , west australian  hardwood. My son had used this wood in one of his architectural models and there were a lot of left overs. It seemed to cut, machine and sand well and was close grained. Therefore, being a cheapskate and not wanting to waste good wood, I have used it.

 

Thanks for all the likes, guys.

Cheers

Dick  

Edited by woodrat

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