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Venetian round ship 13th century by woodrat - 1:32 scale - fully framed

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Hey Dick, I was catching up on what I had missed on Steven’s Dromon build and saw you had been looking for Julian Whitewright’s thesis on lateen rigs in antiquity. If you are still looking for it, here it is: https://www.academia.edu/562936/Maritime_Technological_Change_in_the_Ancient_World_The_invention_of_the_lateen_sail._Volume_One

 

I thought I had read it, but I had actually read his more recent article on rig development chronology: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1095-9270.12278 

 

Helpfully, it had a direct link to his thesis in the references.

 

Your build continues to amaze me, hopefully one day I can be as skilled as you!

 

- Alberto

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On 10/2/2019 at 11:30 PM, Binho said:

Hey Dick, I was catching up on what I had missed on Steven’s Dromon build and saw you had been looking for Julian Whitewright’s thesis on lateen rigs in antiquity. If you are still looking for it, here it is: https://www.academia.edu/562936/Maritime_Technological_Change_in_the_Ancient_World_The_invention_of_the_lateen_sail._Volume_One

- Alberto

Thanks. Alberto, I have downloaded the thesis and have started to read it. I have thought about the design of the colzexe (venetian dialect) as shown in contemporary illustrations. This is the wooden module, scarfed to the top of the mast and which contains the halyard  block and is the site of attachment of the crows nest. The following illustration from the Zibaldone da Canale document is the best available image and I intend to reproduce this in my model.

1297958378_zibaldonedacanale02.jpg.2e1770d29b4471626a29de2b23e3b317.jpg1671833513_zibaldonedacanale04.jpg.334058b1fb9f12d0e3cb1d8ecdee4685.jpg1993135373_zibaldonedacanale05.jpg.88532225535cc4ab14a22975d3411413.jpg

Dick

Edited by woodrat

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6 hours ago, woodrat said:

Thanks. Alberto, I have downloaded the thesis and have started to read it.

Me too. Many thanks, Alberto. Looking forward to a good read.

 

 

Steven

Edited by Louie da fly

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6 hours ago, Mark Pearse said:

Hi Dick

 

mysterious - what do you interpret the parts to be from the drawings?

1925982603_zibaldonedacanale06.jpg.d4ed0dcdfc78371c928c71e724706a55.jpg

The shape of the module is determined by the forward slope of the mast.

 

 

This little guy is trying out the tillers for size.

DSCN1810a.jpg.bc089142b24149f7308fd3702e96b971.jpgDSCN1809a.jpg.8ce337b6060b89b18b58f37b65b5305d.jpgdscn1808a.jpg.889534056e02cff408496c988e042f61.jpg

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Dick,

I just wonder, wouldn't it be more logical that depending on the lee side the rudder on that side would be used, as the other one wouldn't give enough steerage way, Which in turn would imply druxey's rower (nice touch by the way) wouldn't be able to row, as the horizontal bar would be much, much shorter

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6 minutes ago, cog said:

Dick,

I just wonder, wouldn't it be more logical that depending on the lee side the rudder on that side would be used, as the other one wouldn't give enough steerage way, Which in turn would imply druxey's rower (nice touch by the way) wouldn't be able to row, as the horizontal bar would be much, much shorter

Quite right. This is not the final tiller length. They will be shorter. But in the case of running before the wind, both rudders would be in use, either with two helmsmen or with one in the centre. The contemporary illustrations are not helpful. Also, Lego men's shoulders don't abduct away from the side!

10 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

So the colzhexe is the same thing as the calcet on the previous page of this build log?

 

Steven

Yes but I believe the construction was different in venetian naves to the byzantine hence I am using the venetian name.

 

Dick

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9 hours ago, woodrat said:

Lego men's shoulders don't abduct away from the side!

LEGO-man is some what rigid anyway, not an asset when it comes to steering

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Thanks for the pic, Steven, great detail in the rigging.

Here is a couple of pics of the sternshowing the Lego lad in a more useful position. Note the crutch for the mizzen yard

 

DSCN1811a.jpg.8f0d4167f0bf9c03cceab25417a198dc.jpgDSCN1814a.jpg.66bc53242f97b7230a89d48df3ab57f3.jpg

The wooden structure shielding the helmsman is seen in a number of illustrations of round ship.

554593709_Giovanni_Da_Modena_-_The_Return_of_the_Magi03_.jpg.24056585d504460e62647ead41e8518d.jpgDick

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The hull is substantially complete now. The quarter rudders are now shipped. The starboard rudder is in use but the port rudder is not in use and has been retracted using the rudder lift and has been lashed onto one of the through-beams.

DSCN1815a.jpg.fe2d487053a4405735a82aca1fc8dbc6.jpg

DSCN1817a.jpg.71bd41ed8a5e571289f46bfbb3546355.jpg

 

DSCN1820a.jpg.62807d664e719b82221c45f36cc17910.jpg

DSCN1822a.jpg.95bb9ae0308e09d627383061dc20562c.jpg

DSCN1825a.jpg.9b03845a2b6d8803b39f10e483e80d2a.jpg1062086802_venezianostmark08a.jpg.29644c7e623135cca1402f0d2dab9017.jpg

Cheers

Dick

 

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Thanks, Steven. The following shows the masts. I have estimated that the lengths of the masts is about equal to the length of keel as judged by looking at many pictures. The main (forward) mast is longer than the mizzen (rear) mast but, as the main mast is more tilted forward than the mizzen, the height above deck of the colzexe (calcet) and its attached crows nest is the same in both masts.

 

DSCN1842a.jpg.bf5c233a5af1b898bd20446c39abcc70.jpg

The following shows the constructof the colzexe to match the Zibaldoni da Canale illustration

 

dscn1830a.jpg.1bc818eebac02c1ad5693da2a38c6dec.jpg

DSCN1835a.jpg.66d9eea3581da9a42676d1d09fb6623a.jpg

DSCN1836a.jpg.ac17e3e917c302b9f2014c3174f66df8.jpg

DSCN1837a.jpg.7d31528af904426516a7e3ac96bacfd5.jpg

DSCN1840a.jpg.6cdb8f07b80a0e2b693bdd63da56fae4.jpg

 

 

 

DSCN1841a.jpg.e809ecb5a59e06c52e0f96bc7638d6ab.jpg

 

cheers

Dick

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The mast is stepped. Note that in round ships with latin rig the masts are sloped forward the main (forward) mast more so than the mizzen  (after mast).  Long staves which are chamfered as are barrel staves are used to wedge the mast into the mast partners. Then the staves are woolded to the mast . Note that these staves project much higher above the deck thean those in later ships such as carracks. Perhaps this is necessary to compensate for the lack of a forestay in latin rig.

 

DSCN1848a.jpg.388b0ea74f9c951fa009c4391bd4f60a.jpgDSCN1850a.jpg.111289ca9de5358ce3de26724ccba038.jpgDSCN1851a.jpg.1b39d897f753a4611428f35bb2e657d4.jpg

DSCN1852a.jpg.582ca3a474277bb7b503e8bd8c7acc52.jpg

DSCN1854a.jpg.58d30b3b8996b1b0c363c0b0c7cc699b.jpg

Cheers

Dick

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Thanks Steven and Lupus Niger.

I have been busy making blocks for the shrouds. The mediaeval blocks are somewhat different from those of later centuries . As a model I have used the pulleys from the Mataro nao combined with pulleys seen on Carpaccio's paintings. The double blocks for the shroud pendants are in-line rather than side -by-side. Also the mediaeval blocks were often quite sizeable.

dscn1855a.jpg.5a31cd329ffae49b17167f0dc2bf8c25.jpgDSCN1856a.jpg.5d591414bde88b8f65e19f92515c5418.jpgDSCN1857a.jpg.eff38ef0c5e74dc6a4c93fff58a90d88.jpgDSCN1859a.jpg.29acb5bdd1a97df549734be451cfa0c4.jpgDSCN1860a.jpg.2582ca86d4116e8ed152044c2ed2d062.jpgdscn1862a.jpg.a3f14f4000e6480d46e6a4d6dd23cdae.jpg

Now to make some dozens of toggles....

Merry Xmas

Dick🎅

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The shroud rigging.

Pendant blocks connected to shroud by toggles. Lower blocks connected to ring bolts on deck. The tackle needs to be able to be rapidly adjusted during tacking. Lee shrouds are kept slack and the weather shrouds taut.

dscn1863aA.jpg.5eda10afe56737bc7a8c3ab428498629.jpgDSCN1866a.jpg.3419e25f6cdb5cdf2279c187e68f5ae6.jpg

Cheers

Dick

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The construction of the main (forward) and mizzen (aft) yards.

Each yard was in two pieces the upper yard was the penna and was significantly longer than the lower yard, called the carra (also car, carium : Jal Glossaire nautique). The two pieces were fitted together with a curved recess carved into the penna and the two pieces lashed together. The ensemble was called the peciae antennarum (Pecia = piece + antenna = mast) This type of yard is seen in modern dhows and similar vessels.

image.png.232846667c622de3bef9d304ac000395.png

DSCN1869a.jpg.9e4a7885b4a0de573c4d744c4a309304.jpg

DSCN1872a.jpg.bbfe3ce5970bdd906bb635228b88e02a.jpgDSCN1871a.jpg.5e16f435a24210249bec23b427fcebef.jpg

DSCN1875a.jpg.35cc87b17076bcad2bf6655b8197e3e9.jpgDSCN1876a.jpg.0c90cbb61392b11f511fcedc597f9e6e.jpg

Cheers

Dick

 

Edited by woodrat

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At the helpful suggestion of prof. Mauro Bondioli, I have changed the quarterdeck rail from neo-classical kitsch to something more in keeping with the era.

dscn1877a.jpg.f2af037062df27a4c39f7fca03fa764c.jpgdscn1878a.jpg.84cd44ce0b4cb3707d1d1f99cc70544f.jpg

Dick

Edited by woodrat

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