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Boyer 86ft by flying_dutchman2 - FINISHED - Scale 1:48 - 17th Century Dutch Coastal water freighter by Marc Meijer

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Thank you for all the well wishes. My wife had the surgery a week ago and she is already hopping around with a walker 

 

While she was in surgery last week, I stitch the bunt lines on the sails and now working on the bolt ropes. The masts and yards have their hardware attached and all the created blocks have been stopped. The leeboards have been attached. 

 

After using some search scripts in Google I found some really interesting pdf's as books and PhD dissertations about fluitschips. This will help me in building the fluit, the Zeehaen. 

 

Furthermore, after visiting many hobby sites for rigging material, which is rather expensive these days, I am strongly considering purchasing the Ropewalk from Chuck (Syren ship model co.). The Fluit is going to take a lot of rigging and I might as well learn how to make it myself. I tried to make a Ropewalk myself but it turned out to be a complete disaster. 

Marcus 

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I just spotted your thread about the boyer (I am not a very active forum user, I'm afraid).

I want you to know that I appreciate your build and the way you work your way through the difficulties of Dutch shipbuilding. I am aware that these vessels are not everyone's cup of tea. I haven't build this one myself, due to a sort of program I more or less try to follow and the boeier, being a disappearing ship type in the 17th century, is not on my bucket-list.

I'm glad you find your way in the drawings made by my late friend Cor Emke. He just lived long enough to see the book on merchant vessels and the reviews, which made him very happy. I'm sure he would have been proud to see your efforts on the boeier.

Were you aware of the replica of a 'damloper' built in the Broek op Waterland museum, close to your mother's house? Another interesting project for a builder who loves Dutch vessels. I'm sure the museum has drawings.

 

Keep up the good work, Marcus.

Ab

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Ab, 

Thank you very much for the compliments on the Boyer. I love the lines of this ship with all the curves. With this being my second scratch buuld, it has been a challenge. 

The plans are easy to read and Cor has done an excellent job of creating them. The future plan is to build more ships from the merchant book. 

 

My next two builds will be the ships from Abel Tasman from the book with plans and cd. I have always built smaller Dutch vessels so these two will be interesting as they are bigger and a lot more work. 

Furthermore, thank you for the tip on the damloper and I will definitely look into it. 

 

Marcus 

 

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All sails have been hemmed, and the bunt lines and bolt ropes attached. The mizen, spritsail and topsail yards have been attached as well. 

390679290_Boyer86ftsailsdone.thumb.jpg.525d679b1bc9d087ffa449898a4e129c.jpg

 

Presently working on the deadeyes that are part of the lanyards. The wooden template that have the deadeyes pinned to them is to make sure that they are all even. 

1010694417_Boyer86ftdeadeyesinstall1.thumb.jpg.caf7c8d52a5e58062b8963b93daf0886.jpg

 

I use a hemostat to keep the shroud together while seizing. 

737722653_Boyer86ftdeadeyesinstallhemostat.thumb.jpg.326b60663c23881957fe0fb7579bcca5.jpg

 

On a different note, Ab Hoving mentioned a damloper. Other names for this vessel is called a damschuit and damscut. After much research I got some info on this. This is a vessel 'only' the Dutch would invent. 

Completely flat bottom with minimum curvature towards the sides, small long narrow leeboards and very sturdy built. Don't know about the sails yet. What I understand from the literature is that it was used as follows. It is in the water and if they can't sail around the area it was hauled on land, pushed over a dam or dyke and back in the water. Like a modern day amphibian vessel. 

Would be an interesting build. 

 

Marcus 

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Lateen sail is rigged and on the mizen mast.

1270340073_Boyer86ftlateensail2.thumb.jpg.54b5f8737f3240e584a305741c1778df.jpg

1581522839_Boyer86ftlateenrigging2.thumb.jpg.39d64dfd26c08512e50b1eb8dab4df2f.jpg

 

I added parrels (sp.) on the mast as well. This is according to the plans. This was difficult to create as it is very small. 

502543941_Boyer86ftmizenmastparrels.thumb.jpg.461549997b49b9b11f65ebba8d4326bc.jpg

 

Anchors have been created and installed on the bow attached to the bollards. 

 

1365811019_Boyer86ftanchor.thumb.jpg.9d11892314239ea97154cf831b1f8d08.jpg

 

 

Placed some buckets here and there (you can see then on both sides of the windlass) and put some barrels next to the store room. Pictures will follow. 

 

Marcus 

 

 

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The shrouds are installed as well as the back stays. 

1602421190_Boyer86ftshroudsbackstay.thumb.jpg.2d3f6a362f50ee4eb0708f163db87486.jpg

 

The stay and the preventer stay. 

984233496_Boyer86ftstaypreventerstay.thumb.jpg.19a1515471c8166798733e4abb215aeb.jpg

The bowsprit and the spritsail. 

850157640_Boyer86ftbowspritspritsail.thumb.jpg.7bef57455d4f6b5ae7bd8a7a7ed909e3.jpg

 

Question : on the picture below, what the dark black stripes on the stay and the preventer stay? 

Are these metal bars or are they made from thick rope? 

On the Utrecht I used rings to attach the foresail to the stay. Rings will not work this time as the foresail comes down to the heart block. 

1914403685_Boyer86ftwhatisthis.thumb.jpg.576fe9e2fa6eb1b98d14e542ea121fc4.jpg

 

Marcus 

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I did a not so extended search, but thepictures by Nooms show them as rings (just like you did onthe previous one). The blocks for the 'blinde' are not on the stay, but on the preventer, at least, according to Reinier Nooms.

https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/twee-schepen-een-boeier-en-een-galjoot/gAFvr6_AryFkuw?hl=nl&ms={"x"%3A0.47083735115099623%2C"y"%3A0.5291626488490038%2C"z"%3A9.213338350082639%2C"size"%3A{"width"%3A0.916224034672209%2C"height"%3A2.071658709627955}}

Jan

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Jan, thank you for the reply. Now I can continue with the sails. 

 

Everybody else, thank you for the likes. 

 

The bowsprit has a kbob on the end. I wondered why this is so or is it a characteristic of the Boyer.

Marcus 

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Four sails are installed. I am working on the topsail. The rigging is not permanent yet. Everything still needs to be tightened.

1493266987_Boyer86ft4outof5sails.thumb.jpg.f79bc49a4fbee90c5b45fa3c66442c04.jpg

 

Yesterday I created more. belaying pins and a couple of racks were the pins will located. I have added two more racks with belaying pins as the plans do not show where all the roping is going. Sort of disappears around the main mast. 

 

Overal I am pleased with the model. It is a very unique ship. 

Marcus imageproxy.php?img=&key=8f45093723bba175

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Most of the rigging has been installed except for the 4 vangs that are attached to the main sail.

1589194504_Boyer86ft1.thumb.jpg.5a95c6f112fe6071173ae9b742fcea1b.jpg

869298576_Boyer86ft2.thumb.jpg.bcaeeba543c88b8c925a48f9111d510a.jpg

Now, in the process of making the rope coils of various sizes. I will add a Dutch flag from that era. 

 

This is large model, 31 inches from the tip of the bowsprit to the tip of the mizen yard. 

1129891980_Boyer86ftrigging1.thumb.jpg.3a222ddde696e2cd95cbf6a66bd9f21f.jpg

1275414053_Boyer86ftrigging2.thumb.jpg.e541b4538534ef65fef0a26ff779b1e8.jpg

1973917390_Boyer86ftrigging4.thumb.jpg.b04b260ac55ffd378d20135b20300789.jpg

1556954489_Boyer86ftrigging5.thumb.jpg.e3339630d302968cf992384cbc16e425.jpg

686219560_Boyer86ftbarrels.thumb.jpg.2f3a784f30fddef3b10925b954350135.jpg

1117130646_Boyer86ftrigging6.thumb.jpg.556a13559044b5366e3123e3cc4361eb.jpg

Marcus 

 

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Hi Marcus

 

It’s been a while since I’ve popped in, but dang, those sails looks marvellous!  

 

As as for the rest of the build, well, you know what I think of your boat overall.  Yep, I’ve said it before..loads of character and charm.  A real joy to look at.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

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Some more pictures. Let me know if they are too dark. 

76277449_Boyer86ftDone11.thumb.jpg.fe67adfcc1262c1c5b017e4435d280da.jpg

1660243443_Boyer86ftDone12.thumb.jpg.854691124a860e91a71e8dca426cde8e.jpg

115699286_Boyer86ftDone13.thumb.jpg.0e9f25bc661d334fc087863095ca98f6.jpg

976106392_Boyer86ftDone14.thumb.jpg.fa1206a81b36fe7c776ce692b8eb5e8a.jpg

2086358547_Boyer86ftDone15.thumb.jpg.93609aa75d7cf0d88aa8d4ae641fa58f.jpg

1317256314_Boyer86ftDone16.thumb.jpg.9ad29f91c3033530fb235115cc60ab92.jpg1496036512_Boyer86ftDone17.thumb.jpg.eb5c180c6338d97b7226ff327e1fb4cc.jpg

1790639296_Boyer86ftDone18.thumb.jpg.6055633ec023f776b8b44c603f8f3606.jpg1363377356_Boyer86ftDone19.thumb.jpg.7b002dd193fd58ecf817f2dd2602dd52.jpg

 

My next ship is the Zeehaen (sea rooster) , which is a Fluit and one of the ships from Abel Tasman, a Dutch explorer. 

The scale will be 1:37.5. The other ship from Tasman was a war yacht and will be building her as well. 

Marcus 

 

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What a beautiful build Marcus.  Like you, I love these old Dutch ships and am looking forward in joining your next builds.

 

Cheers,

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Nice work on a nice ship.

I like these ships so much more than those three decked hms something :)

give us a shout when Zeehaan is started, we’ll be there.

 

Jan

 

 

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22 hours ago, KeithAug said:

 

 

22 hours ago, KeithAug said:

Well done Marcus - a very enjoyable build to follow - looking forward to the next one.

Thanks, glad you liked it. 

Marcus 

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15 hours ago, Piet said:

What a beautiful build Marcus.  Like you, I love these old Dutch ships and am looking forward in joining your next builds.

Thanks, Piet. 

Yes, the older ships are beautiful and different from mainstream ships from that era 

Marcus 

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15 hours ago, Omega1234 said:

Congratulations Marcus

 

You’ve done a marvellous job!  You must be justifiably proud of what you’ve achieved. 

 

Thanks, Patrick 

Building the Boyer was a significant challenge. Lots of improvising as there is little or more like non-existing information of these ships out there. 

Marcus 

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