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Y.T.

HMS Victory by Y.T. - Mamoli - 1:90 scale

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I decided to build HMS Victory by Mamoli 1:90 scale. Reasons? I wanted to build a model which is a) relatively complex; b)not too large so I can work on it in my condo (moved out of house a few years ago); c) of a beautiful and historically important ship. Choice fell on Victory. Selected Mamoli kit because of scale, price and nice cast details. Let us see how it goes.

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I opened up all parts packaging so I could count part quantities and re packaged them in all kinds of boxes, zip lock bags and containers. It appeared I am missing celluloid plastic for stern windows. This issue is currently resolved. This forum's samueljr had a spare Mamoli windows celluloid and he kindly mailed them to me. Thanks a lot Sam!

I can be easily short of 1st layer planking strips. They gave only 80 pcs of 5 mm wide strips = 400 mm total width when largest frame circumference I have to cover with these planks is at least 420 mm. What do I do with this?

 

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Here I glued 3 parts keel together. Note that in order for notches on the parts to match together some considerable filing was required. As well I was unpleasantly surprised with low ply wood quality.

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These little holes on keel front side were not opened. I had to do it myself. Note that hole location was different by about 4 mm between part drawing and complete assembly drawing Table B. I had to make decision where to make these holes and decided to go by the Table B drawing. Look at poor quality of plywood and poor contour cut by manufacturer.

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I went to Home Depot nearby and purchased a 1' x 3' pine shelve board for the ship building base and 2 poplar 1/4 x 2 x 3 feet planks to hold the keel straight. Board is CAD $10 and each plank is CAD $2.50. Good deal!

 

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This evening was dedicated to adjusting 18 frames vertically in order for ship hull to have a proper body curvatures. I want all curves of my model to be smooth with no bumps. This is probably one of most important operations in building of a hull of a kit model. This is very difficult to do with these 18 manufactured frames as they cut very inaccurately - I would say they are cut all over the place. It is a shame to have them cut so inaccurately in the age of CNC machining. Because of inaccuracy of frames I have difficulty to decide which reference points to take for vertical adjustment. Frame common reference points to select can be:

a) surface for attaching a deck?

b)a side line going through notches cut for attaching cast gun ports?

c) the frame very bottom points?

I put all frames into a keel and sat with the model for many hours measuring, re aligning and vertically re positioning these frames. I found that none of above reference points can be taken as 100% reference. I had to come up with a compromise which makes a), b)and c) references to be not too much off practical sense. Below is a picture showing what I came up with. See the thread inserted into gun port notches. The thread curvature aligned itself not so badly. Each frame bottoms are not much too off as well. Top surfaces for gluing decks are not 100% level but are going to be pretty easy to fix with filing the wood off or adding some wood on a few frames. This is the way I will glue this together tomorrow. Have a good night.

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two last frames at the back have the keel notches cut too wide so they sat loose on the keel. I added some wood strips on the keel to have frames to sit tight.

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Gluing a strip of wood on top of one of frames to level its deck surface with other frames. This only frame appeared to be too much off deck level while its bottom and gun port notches are in proper alignment.

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Edited by Y.T.

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Thinking again of frame / keel plywood provided in the kit. May be this plywood is so soft and pliable on purpose? It is very easy to file and it does not easily chip off. The plywood on my San Fransisco by AL was pretty hard and was chipping off like crazy.

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I purchased new carpenters glue called EXPRESS as it dries in 10 minutes. This is great help. Also the bottle and the applicator on it are very convenient.

Here I am gluing frames. In order to prevent distortion I am doing this operation one frame at a time putting all assembly together each time including aligning longitudinal bars.

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I found that one (just one) of the frames is missing some "meat" on one side. I found that looking along the skeleton of a hull I made so far. I have to add some wood on this frame so I do not have a dent in my hull body. For this purpose I normally use a wooden coffee stirring sticks available in dollar stores. Here is a picture of what I have now.

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I curved this wet wooden strip on the frame and attached it with small nails. I always pre-drill a hole in wood before I insert a nail. See below.

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I just found that 1st deck on the front cannot by design fit into place unless I brake it. I have no issue with that. Wood is easy to fix but may be I am missing something. Please advise if there are other ways to install it but brake it apart and glue it together when in place. See pictures of the problem below. I created an inquiry in hull building section of this forum.

 

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You are on your way to a great model.  I built this kit some 30 years ago, enjoyed the experience, learned a lot, and made a plethora of mistakes.  Might I suggest you brace the bow and stern on your building board.  I found the keel plate and bulkheads could easily twist out of alignment, so perhaps bracing fore and aft would help to obviate this problem.  Check the run of the decks fore and aft from time to time.  I discovered a slight twist very late in building and had to make cosmetic adjustments.  You are right to be very careful now to get everything into proper position. 

 

Wayne

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Looking good starting in good fashion,

You might find it usefull with keeping all the frames an equal distance from each other by starting from the very front frame,  measure a perfect triangle from the front of the beak head where the figurehead goes, back to each edge of the very front frame,  that way you start off with a lined up front,    after doing this I would brace between each and every frame with pieces of wood say 2x2mm place then top and bottom between frames (but make sure they are perfectly the same size as each other between a frame) continue this all the way to the rear.

This way it makes sure your framed  skeleton is both sqaure - equaly spaced frames and also braced for strength that will help stop the frames from moving.

 

Hope this helps.

 

OC.

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have seen LEGO ,bricks used to square and line the frames , i assume cause they are perfectaly square , might be a help if u think it needs it ,I assume the deck that won,t fit will be planked so slit it down the middle , but only trim the outsides if it,s not a perfect fit 

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8 hours ago, wrkempson said:

She won a contest with Model Expo, and now sits in my office.  

Hi wrkempson . May be you could then take a few good pictures of the hull and post them here for my building reference? I would really appreciate it. Mamoli pencil drawings sometimes do not provide enough information on certain aspects of building the model. Thanks. I am specifically interested in stern and front of the ship.

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6 hours ago, Old Collingwood said:

Looking good starting in good fashion,

You might find it usefull with keeping all the frames an equal distance from each other by starting from the very front frame,  measure a perfect triangle from the front of the beak head where the figurehead goes, back to each edge of the very front frame,  that way you start off with a lined up front,    after doing this I would brace between each and every frame with pieces of wood say 2x2mm place then top and bottom between frames (but make sure they are perfectly the same size as each other between a frame) continue this all the way to the rear. This way it makes sure your framed  skeleton is both sqaure - equaly spaced frames and also braced for strength that will help stop the frames from moving...

Hi Old Collingwood! Thanks a lot for your comments. They could be really useful if :( I did not already glued on all frames. :( I should have tried to match frames alignment with decks provided by manufacturer. I then could have had much less work to do on the decks. Nevertheless frames are all glued. Last evening I spent leveling frame top surfaces to be perfect level and properly curved along the hull to accept 1st deck. Today I was trying to set 1st level deck onto the frames. I had lots of deck trimming to do in order them to fit onto the frames. This resulted in some unpleasant gaps around deck and the frames. By the way this deck piece on the front I complained about that it would not fit unless cut, I managed to insert it with no application of water. Just some tweaking with the deck filing in this and that place. Bad thing is now all 1st level deck pieces are sitting on but there are pretty large gaps in some places around the frames (ohh... it would be nice if Old Collingwood comments came before I glued the frames on). This however should be not big issue. This is why I love to work with wood. On wood ALL IS FIXABLE. I will add some support strips and lay over other wood pieces to be level with the surface of 1st deck. See decks are on the hull but not yet glued on. I will glue later.

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1 hour ago, Y.T. said:

Hi Old Collingwood! Thanks a lot for your comments. They could be really useful if :( I did not already glued on all frames. :( I should have tried to match frames alignment with decks provided by manufacturer. I then could have had much less work to do on the decks. Nevertheless frames are all glued. Last evening I spent leveling frame top surfaces to be perfect level and properly curved along the hull to accept 1st deck. Today I was trying to set 1st level deck onto the frames. I had lots of deck trimming to do in order them to fit onto the frames. This resulted in some unpleasant gaps around deck and the frames. By the way this deck piece on the front I complained about that it would not fit unless cut, I managed to insert it with no application of water. Just some tweaking with the deck filing in this and that place. Bad thing is now all 1st level deck pieces are sitting on but there are pretty large gaps in some places around the frames (ohh... it would be nice if Old Collingwood comments came before I glued the frames on). This however should be not big issue. This is why I love to work with wood. On wood ALL IS FIXABLE. I will add some support strips and lay over other wood pieces to be level with the surface of 1st deck. See decks are on the hull but not yet glued on. I will glue later.

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Dont worry at all about any gaps with the first decking piece  as your actual decking boards will fit ontop of  this  and they will cover any gaps, also  there will be the inside bulwark (side wall)  area to fit planks like when you plank a garden fence - ontop of eache othe flush not overlapping each other.

 

Personaly I would do you inside first consisting of your side planks and deck planks  (But what I would do to get the right scale thickness of your hull wall  (it should be about 2 - 3  scale feet in thickness)  the way to do this is to carefully trim down the top section of each frame down to where they meet the deck, if you do this so each one is the same width and thickness following the profile of the curve, this would just be done on the inside of the frames (Not the outside edge)

After you have trimmed down each frame and they are all the same, next I would start planking your deck  (this is ofcourse after you have glued down the sheet deck you show in your pics above)   start planking from the center line working left and right so they eventualy fill the deck with the same amount of deck boards laft and right,  I would then leave a slight gap near to the frames so you can start to fill in the side walls as I mentioned.

After a row or two of wall planks are on all the way from bow to stern, you can then fill the gap of missing deck boards by fitting a side deck board line, that acts like a frame and is flush with the deck boards but bends round to follow the hull wall shape.

 

##Foregot to mention  at the front bow end you might need to end your inside wall planking in the center of the first frame - same with the curved deck edging plank, these could be fitted after you have done some outside hull planking in the frontall area.

 

Hope this is clear enough.

 

OC.

Edited by Old Collingwood
added extra.

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My advice is based more on what not to do (because I did it) than anything else.  I notice you have not cut the rabbet on the keel plate.  I don't know when Mamoli asks you to do this, but now is going to be a better time than later.  Actually, before assembling the bulkheads would have been better still.  Particularly at the stern, the rabbet is cut so that the planking (both layers if you go that route) will sit flush with the stern post area.  It will never be easier than at the present to cut in the rabbet.  Attaching the false decks  will give the hull some rigidity for the work needed to get ready for the external planking.

 

A lot of this (or any) model is thinking ahead.  Now is a good time to educate yourself on the external planking process since all your good work on the bulkheads leads to the planking.  Knowing what's coming will help you do the preparatory work now.

 

Wayne

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