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Charles W. Morgan by ragove - Model Shipways - 1/64th scale


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At long last I have started my CWM. This kit has been in my stash for quite some time.  I saw no point in photographing the kit contents as there are quite a few Morgan build logs showing the parts.  I will note that, contrary to the instructions, the center keel was a single laser cut piece, not 2 pieces. I do not know if this is still the case, but it makes for an easier start to the build. The photo shows my building slip set up to start test-fitting the bulkheads.

CWM.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Work on the Morgan has been slow. I am taking my time making sure that each bulkhead aligns to the reference marks and is square to the keel. I am letting the glue set at least overnight before moving on. I have found that shaping the bevels is so much easier with solid wood bulkheads.  Beveling plywood is a pain.

20E6D42A-EDF7-4588-9205-151212B0427E.jpeg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Finished the bulkheads and, following the building instructions, attached temporary battens along the bulkheads verifying that the spacing was identical port and starboard. I did this by cutting spacers that would just fit between bulkheads at the center keel and then used them to properly space the outside.  Only tiny adjustments were necessary because I had been very careful to square up the bulkheads as I glued them in place.

CWM adjusting frames.jpg

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I have shaped the counter block and started the transom framing. I made a quick jig, not in picture, to hold the frame piece at the correct angle until the glue dried. I will trim the frame pieces to length when they are all in place.  I found the counter block was very difficult to get right.  There are a lot of angles and bevels.  In fact, I messed one up and had to start again. 

counter block.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

Wow almost 2 months since my last post.  Been busy with other projects but I also had a VERY difficult time with the sheer rail at the bow.  The laser cut pieces were constantly breaking.  Every time i tried to work near the bow my hand would slip or I'd put too much pressure on something and snap, the rail would break along the grain.  i think every layer of grain now has been glued together. Finally got it in and inserted the bulwarks; also a difficult task getting them all aligned.  I couldn't figure out how to feather the waterway into the ceiling planks without the ceiling planks in place. So I modified the build order and laid a few ceiling planks and this provided a reference to feather the waterway. As one can see in the photo, more sanding is needed for a smooth transition. The Morgan will go on a 10 week hiatus as my wife and i are traveling up to the Canadian Maritime Provinces. Specifically, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

sheer rail.jpg

waterway.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Planking is now underway.  I had a bad time with the bow as the plank shear broke into many pieces during earlier stages of the build. I patched it up as best I could and continued.  However, once i started planking I could see that my repairs we not good.  The port and starboard sides were quite asymmetrical. I had to rip out all of the planking around the bow, repair the asymmetry and start planking again again.  Looks much better at the bows now.  A bit of filling and sanding to do still. Ready to start the planks below the wale.

bow shot.jpg

CWM planking .jpg

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You're coming along pretty well. I had quite a bit of trouble with the plankshear on my CWM too, not so much it breaking, but rather I couldn't seem to maintain a consistent projection from the hull for the length of the ship. If you're unhappy with the look of your plankshear, I would echo Landlubber Mike's suggestion to sand it smooth with the hull and then apply a new piece over top. That's what I did as well. It gave a very crisp look and it's a very easy fix.

David

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Thanks for the advice. I had pretty much decided to sand the plankshear down and put on a piece of strip wood.  I tried just building up the low sections with smaller lengths but it looks messy. Better to sand it all out and add a new piece.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I misread the drawing of the “fashion piece” in the instruction book. I was seeing it applied to the stern. I realized before getting very far that it is applied to the side of the hull along the edge where the side meets the stern. I have include a picture as I thought it shows the usefulness of the building slip more than the fashion piece.

198A6FCB-4CB5-4472-B545-DCA65FBBF29D.jpeg

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While trying to fit the fashion pieces at the stern I realized that my stern and transom did not agree with the plans. I had to rip out some planking and reshape the stern block. I should have been more careful with the shaping when I first did it.  Maybe I learned a good lesson.  Once again the building slip shows it’s versatility. 

C7BC8BD3-8C76-4939-8E08-177BE0410B8B.jpeg

AAD86A62-E3BD-4B1C-AC18-10B1E3087984.jpeg

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