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HM Naval Cutter Speedy 1828 by Thunder - FINISHED - Model Shipwright - Scale 1:48


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It is some time since I did a model log as I do not generally have the time or remember to take the required photographs as I complete the build - or should I say - do not have the self discipline. This build is no different but as it is an unusual kit I have decide to share it so far.

This is not the usual kit you will find on the shelves in a store, although I have found reference to it on this site. I purchased this, as I have done many other, by impulse through a well known auction site. Little did I know what I was taking on. 

The kit comes with very good drawings and detailed instructions by Bill Shoulder and the main reason for buying it, apart from my love of Cutters, is the description that implies that the kit was produced to provide something of a higher standard than a normal kit and for a 'museum' standard. This coupled with the model shipwright name made me believe this to be a quality kit. Also, I have had it 'in stock' for some time and Chuck's kit was not produced at the time. I believed it to offer more than the Lady Nelson or Sherbourne kits.

Edited by Thunder
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The kit came with most of the usual parts that you would usually expect but no dowelling for the masts. These were not missing, it actually states this on the box. Strange that it should have blocks and rigging thread. Kit photographs below:

 

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Above is the booklet by Bill Shoulder that, with plans, could be purchased separately. These show a Clinker built hull which I believe was 'out of favour' by this time.

Edited by Thunder
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Above is the parts list, not sure what type of paper made off but something had been eating it away.

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Found this note inside. Obviously never came to hand as were not in the kit. Also ages the kit to 1975 when I was 5 years old! Would love to know why that first owner did not build it and if he returned the kit. Did not live far from me either.

Edited by Thunder
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So, first stage of the build. First checked keel section and 'deck' section against the model plans and then to the ship plans. To clarify this, the the first plan shown above I will describe as ship plans as these replicate the plans at the NMM. The third set are like you would get in your average kit. Why he didn't just use the ship plans to make the bulkheads I will never know, unless it is to make it harder to check the accuracy.

The 'deck' and keel only needed minor modification to match the model plans. More work was required to correct the slots for the bulkheads and to get correct alignment between the two. Thank fully most slots were too narrow and care in opening also corrected the alignments.

Before any one spots it, the 'deck' plan is the wrong way round in the photograph. I say deck but it is a bulkhead stabiliser. Why he didn't put it in the position of the false deck I do not know, other than it is too thick to gain the deck curvature both larboard to starboard or fore and aft.

 

 

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Hi Lou, yes it was ebay. I noticed you have Corel's Resolution. They listed this as a cutter but is obviously a sloop. I have built this and thoroughly enjoyed it. I noticed you are going to remodel. Recently I brought a book on naval sloops and there was drawings of HMS Ferret. This I noticed was very close to the Corel kit.

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Ply keel sections applied as shown above, unfortunately this does add to the, already exposed, edge of the ply.

 

I have listed the kit as 1:48 scale but the drawings state 1/4" to the foot. I know that it was a kit produced in the 70's but being a 70's child imperial is pretty much lost on me. Even though I have spent my life in Engineering it is something that I have never really become fluent in (Mainly Electrical Engineering). So if someone can confirm the scale please?

 

Next step was to fix the bulkheads in place. I checked the supplied bulkheads against the modelling plan sheet and all of them were poorly cut. I also compared them to the ship plans on the other sheet and they didn't match here either. As the positions didn't match up perfectly I decided to go with the kit plans. I traced the shapes on to thick card and overlaid onto the bulkheads. At this point I found only 5 to be usable with some bolstering by applying strip to the edges and sanding back.

 

I then noticed another big mistake I had made. I hadn't checked them to make sure that they were symmetrical to the centre line. I was now down to three originals. Ply was obtained and new bulkheads cut.

 

 

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As you can see the bulkheads do not have slots so needed careful marking out to ensure when fixed in place they were in correct alignment.

Edited by Thunder
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Started to fix bulkheads in place using the Hobby Zone Professional Building slip. My wife purchased this directly from the Polish website as it was out of stock in the UK. Arrived very quickly. The only issue I had was pin length. They protruded very slightly out of the base. Unfortunately I didn't notice till after I dragged it across my refurbished oak desk. Scratches still to be polished out.

 

 

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Each bulkhead was checked for fit, correct heights from the bearding line to the top of the bulkheads, that they were perfectly central and heights on each side. To assist with this I marked the lines across the bulkhead support on the building slip.

 

Each time the support had to be moved it was checked with a square to make sure it was true. My old Billings slip had slides to assist in keeping things square. As you can see on the first three photographs I have added these to mine. 

Edited by Thunder
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Thanks Coxwain, I got to the scale quite differently converting to millimetres first then dividing one by the other. Always seems a shame that we have left imperial behind and yet it is still used in America. I had to work on American packaging machines in the past and had to dig out my Grandad's old spanners to take to work as nothing was to hand.

 

I know what you mean about these old kits but did question whether it should be built or left as a collectors piece - but it was meant to be built.

 

I have found reference to an HMS Endeavour kit by Trident Models that I would love to get hold off and keep an eye out for the Nonsuch by Aeropiccola. But I have purchased many old kits that were very poor and sold on. These could not have done much for advertising the hobby back in the day.

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I jumped ahead a bit over the next stages and failed to take photographs. After the bulkheads were all fitted the supporting 'deck' was fitted. I say deck but it has no use than to support the structure. Until this point the bulkheads were very weak so it was essential to fit this before any fairing of the bulkheads was attempted.

 

 

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As yo see other work has been completed but will describe later. Once this 'deck' was fitted I started to fair the bow bulkheads but the first bulkhead was very week and the bulkhead 'tabs' started to break so I had to put in a strengthening piece between them and attempted to remove after the planking had been finished.

Edited by Thunder
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The next stage was the transom section. I started to build in place but it was far too flimsy so built before installing. It is made of three pieces that all require the correct angles. To assist in this there was two formers included in the kit which can be seen in the first parts photo above just to the right outer edge of the opened box. Once fixed in place this structure was extremely flimsy and almost impossible to fit correctly. Chamfering the edges was even harder.

 

 

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On 4/24/2018 at 11:06 AM, Thunder said:

I noticed you have Corel's Resolution. They listed this as a cutter but is obviously a sloop. I have built this and thoroughly enjoyed it. I noticed you are going to remodel. Recently I brought a book on naval sloops and there was drawings of HMS Ferret. This I noticed was very close to the Corel kit.

Hi Thunder

 

I am following your build as in some ways it is similar to my Providence build, (A bash using the AL Independence as a base). At one point I was considering the Resolution as a base but even though the Independence is a sloop she is a closer match. I will still be using some features of the Resolution in my build though later on. 

You are right about Corel though. They are totally lost when it comes to the Resolution. Like you noticed she is more closely related to the Ferret and Shark than any other vessel and is truly not a cutter at all but a sloop. In addition the real Resolution was not a sloop at all but a ship rigged vessel! I suspect Corel was mixed up between the term 'sloop of war' meaning any navel ship with less than twenty guns, and a sloop meaning a single masted fore and aft rigged ship! 

 

As coxswain already said, 1/48th and 1/4"= 1' are just two ways of saying the same thing. Your metric equivalent would be 1/50th scale. 

 

We have the same problem here with tools. Most things made here are SAE and everything else is metric!

 

Take care   

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Hi Lou,

 

I did find details of a HMS Resolution that was a Cutter and lost in the North sea with all hands. I am on holiday at the moment so cannot get the details for you. I think it is most likely that Corel made this kit up completely as I have found no plans for the vessel I mention above.

 

Below is my Resolution:

 

 

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Hi Thunder

Your's is the second Resolution I have seen finished and they are both beautiful. The other one was done by a guy locally and he converted it to a three masted Sloop of War, as it appears Captain Cook's Resolution was. But as cook's  Resolution was also a converted merchant collier of over 450 tons there may be some problems there as well.

 

But you may be right as well There is no reason that the Resolution you speak of was not a ship that had the same lines as the Ferrett or Shark.They may have been a class of sloops on the British navy much like the later Cruizer class of Brigantines. I have never really researched the whole thing further than what Gregory shows in his post above.

Edited by lmagna
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My own fault for getting this build off course, I should perhaps dig out my Resolution build and put it back on.

 

The next stage, after the fairing of the bulkheads, was to place the two key planks. In order to achieve this I started to carefully mark their positions on the bulkheads (usually do this prior to fitting them). When doing this I discovered the deck heights were going to vary drastically over the length of the hull. The deck supports, which were part of the inner bulkheads were all at the incorrect heights. An approximately check of gun port positions confirmed this.

 

The next series of photographs show the two key planks fitted and modifications made to the bulkheads for the deck heights. The positioning of the key planks and locking them in position was very important as they also had to be used to ensure that transom assembly was perfectly square.

 

More on the deck height later!

 

P1060828.thumb.JPG.47d1731e3c558aac43713ff8136c76b7.JPG From this photographs you can see blocks fitted to assist the planking between the bulkheads. At the bow, fixed to the inside of the stem, from the 'deck' up is the Apron. This, together with the 1mm ply fitted to the keel makes a perfect slot for the planking to land in.

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10 hours ago, Gregory said:

In a discussion a while back, it was surmised that the Corel Resolution is based on HMS Ferrett of 1711

 

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Thank you for the link, I had found the ferret drawings as recently as last Christmas in a book I was brought on Royal Naval Sloops. With this confirmation I can finally make a name plate for my HMS Ferret!

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Back on with the build.

 

The instructions book actually did not tell you to put the first key hull planks in place but told you to put deck stringers in place. These are fitted inside the frames along the length of the deck pretty much as you would fit the waterways but are only there to lay the deck beams onto.

As the top tabs of the frames are so weak and I needed to get the stern correctly aligned I decided to switch these stages and plank the hull first. Also, reading on, the tops of the frames were to be reduced in size. This would mean these stringers would no longer be against them.

 

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The key planks were also the sheer strake and the main wale. The pictures on the box art showed the model as clinker planked but the instruction book described this as 'clench' and then described how this is not necessary correct as by this period carvel planking was the common practice.

 

I decided to do this Carvel and perhaps attempt clinker for my Lady Nelson build.

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O.K. big jump now as went on holiday and didn't take photographs. So here we have hull planking complete. Only has one layer. The 40 year old planking smelled a bit but was really nice to work with.

To plank area above the wale was done first. Then temporary 'stringers' were used to divide each side of the hull into four. These area were then planked using proportional dividers. With two layer planking I usually use scale length plank but due to lack of bulkheads and one layer these go full length of the hull.

 

 

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You may of seen the red lines on the hull in the above photographs, I often use the laser, I have for installing sockets in kitchens, for my hull marking out. bottom edge of keel set correctly as per kit plans, ensure level from larboard to starboard and then use laser to mark out.

 

Close up of marking out method below also showing Wale in position which had it edges painted black prior to fixing.

 

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Gun port positions marked out. This needed doing before inner bulwarks or decking as false frames needed installing inside the planking at the gun port edges.

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