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Chuck

Medway Longboat - 1742 -1/2" scale - by Chuck - (FINISHED!!)

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Making rigging progress.

 

Will have more details once I get back from the dentist.  But here is what the longboat looks like today.

 

Just have the bowsprit to install and some running rigging.  Almost there.

 

Gaff was rigged first...then it was time for the shrouds followed by the backstays.  Most of the lines were attached prior to placing this on the model.

 

gaff.jpg

 

backstays.jpg

forestay1.jpg

 

Deadeys and shrouds are hooked to the straps.  So they were prepared ahead of time.  Including the straps and hooks for the backstays.

 

deadeyes1.jpg

Finally the forestay...

 

mainstay.jpg

forestay.jpg

Note how the straps were bent to fit around the molding.  

shrouds.jpg

The shrouds, backstays and forestay were served but only where they are seized around the mast.  The area served extends about 1" below the where it was seized.   This is an optional detail.  You dont have to do this.  But it does look good.

riggingshroudsserved.jpg

 

Chuck

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Thank You!!  😊

 

Time to step the bowsprit.  The bowsprit irons can be made many different ways.  You can use brass for all the parts and do some soldering if you want.  That is one method.  I did use some brass but I also simplified the process so I wouldnt have to solder anything.  

 

The photo below shows the two brass bars 1/16" x 1/16".  The longer one was pretty simple.  I just cut the strip to length after filing a pin in one end.  You could also file this pin into both sides if you like.  It will be blackened later before I add them to the model.

 

The second smaller piece was the same.  I filed a small pin into one side. BUT I also drilled a small hole through the other.  This is for the little brass pin.  I used a #66 drill bit.  The trick is to use a light tough and let the bit cut through the brass.  To much pressure and you will break the bit.  Then I rounded off that end.

 

Both of these pieces need to be measured off your own model.  They are shown on the plans but because there will be so many small differences you need to measure your own model for their length.

 

Finally...black tape was cut to 1/16" wide and wrapped around the bowsprit to simulate the iron rings.  The brass strips will be pinned into these.  Once blackened and with the use of some weathering powder you wont be able to tell they are two pieces or not metal.  You could also use boxwood strips and just use some black wire for the pins.  If you paint them black and weather them you wont be able to tell.   Its up to you.  

 

bowspritirons.jpg

You must figure out exactly where the tape bands should be before you commit to gluing everything in position.  Measure carefully.  

 

Then drill a small hole in the bottom of the aft end of teh bowsprit.  Make sure the sheave on the other end is facing the correct way first.  That would be a big mistake.  

 

You will need to drill a hole through the thwart for the larger brass strip with the pin facing up (unless you put a pin on both sides then it doesnt matter).  But once again you must drill the hole in the right place.  You only have one shot at this.  Make sure you test the bowsprit in position and figure out where on the thwart you need to drill the hole.  I used a #49 drill bit.  Then I squared up the hole with a small needle file.

 

Once done you can see how convincing it looks.  The pin was glued into the hole on the tape (simulated iron ring) on the end of the bowsprit.  The bottom can be pinned into the platform or just glued into another hole through the platform.  Its up to you.

 

bowspritirons2.jpg

 

Finally.....the small brass piece was glued into a hole drilled into the other iron strap (tape).  Then a small brass pin was used to secure the other end through the stem as shown below.  Make sure these are glued in good.  You must carefully find the length for this brass piece because it determines the angle for the bowsprit.  If the brass strip is too long or short then the bowsprit will not sit at the correct angle.

 

bowspritirons1.jpg

You can see that I also added the foresail halliard.  The single block was hooked into an eyebolt at the aft side of the stem.  Note the optional thimble on the block.

 

 

 

 

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Making the traveler ring...

 

I sell these already made for Cheerful but for this kit you will need to make your own.  This one is much smaller but its really simple to make,  You will get a split ring about 1/4" round that is made from 1mm micro tubing.   You will also need to make a hook and a simulated shackle from 24 gauge black wire.  Because this model is 1/2" scale the hooks are a prominent feature of the rigging.  You should take your time with these and try to make some really good looking hooks.  Practice a bit and I am sure you will get the hang of it.  They are so much better than using photoetch versions that you can buy.

 

Also note that I have slid a decent length of 28 gauge black wire into the split ring.  Leave a portion of it hanging out as shown.  Once again this is my method of making a traveler ring that requires no soldering at all.  It will stay together perfectly and they look great.   So if you need one for another project, consider this method.

 

travelerring.jpg

Then slip your shackle and hook onto the ring.  You will of course need to make sure that the eyes in your hook and shackle fit onto the ring when you make them.  Try and keep these pieces small because most of the time I see folks making huge hooks and shackles for the traveler ring and it will look really funny.  The hook goes between the two eyes of the shackle.  Then bend the ring like you are going to close it up but before you do....slide the end of the 28 gauge wire into the other side of the ring.  Guide it through quite a bit as this is what keeps everything together.  I slowly inch it in the other end using a needle nose pliers.  Once blackened this will look very good.

 

travelerring1.jpg

 

Here is a look at the traveler ring in position.   The jib halliard is hooked to the traveler ring while the outhaul is seized to the shackle.  You must rig both of these to get the proper tension on the lines.  This is all sown on the rigging plans.  The outhaul uses .018 light brown rope while the jib halliard uses .025 light brown rope.

 

The other "loose end" of the outhaul run through the sheave on the tip of the bowsprit.   Then it foes down to the sheave on the stem (starboard side).   Then you can bring the running end inboard and belay it around the first thwart.  Finish it up with a rope coil.  The jib halliard is preety straight forward.  Just like the halliard for the foresail.  You make up some blocks with a hook.   Its shown on the rigging plan and all of those loose ends are belayed to the pins around the mast.

 

foresailhalliardouthaul.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

jibhalliardtravring.jpg

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Once the jib and foresail halliards were done all I really had to do was rig the flag halliard.  This will complete the rigging.....once I add the rope coils to all belaying points.

 

The flag halliard (.018 light brown) Is run through the simulated sheave on the starboard side of the ball truck on top of the mast.    Both ends run down to the deadeyes where they are belayed.   One to each deadeye.   Then they are finished up with some rope coils so the belaying looks credible. 

 

riggingdone3.jpg

I adjusted the tension on all lines and then finished every belaying point off with a nice neat rope coil.  The flag was made in teh usual way and you will get one with the rigging package.   This pretty much finishes off the model.  Here are some photos.  The only thing I have left to do is make a few oars.   I will get to that soon.   But the model is pretty much done.  

 

The grapnel was finished off with some .025 rope as well.

 

Let me know if you have any questions.  I will now try and catch up with the instructions so you guys can get this far too!!!

 

ensignrigged.jpg

riggingdone.jpg

riggingdone1.jpg

riggingdone2.jpg

riggingdone4.jpg

riggingdone5.jpg

riggingdone6.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Hi chuck,

will you let me know when you have stocked up on the kit, and when you are able to ship across the pond again?  I am now entering a very busy period with the Uni and might not have time to follow up on a day-to-day business - and I HATE to miss out on the kit for a 3rd time

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No, plans are NOT available.  You must buy a kit.  They are just out of stock and should be restocked soon.  Waiting on some 1/32" cedar sheets to make another ten kits.  As soon as I get them I will finish them up.

 

I will announce here that they are available.

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On 3/4/2019 at 12:54 AM, Chuck said:

No, plans are NOT available.  You must buy a kit.  They are just out of stock and should be restocked soon.  Waiting on some 1/32" cedar sheets to make another ten kits.  As soon as I get them I will finish them up.

 

I will announce here that they are available.

Ah, perhaps I should have read to the end of the thread BEFORE I emailed you asking if you intend to continue offering the kit. 🙂

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It is a very good job !  I like it so much and it gave me the taste to get back to the "Longboat Armed for War 1834" from the monography by Gérard Delacroix (from scratch) that I have began last year but I had failed to do the mould and I began a sailing boat, promising myself to do that longboat some day.

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Chuck, I'm about to try and make the belaying pins. What is the length of the pins that you made for this boat? Thanks.

 

Bob

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Dont know off-hand but the easiest way to tell is measure from the plans.  I think they were around 11/16" 

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Thanks Chuck. I went back to the plans and finally found the belay pin...it's easy to miss but it's there. Your guess of around 11/16 is right on...maybe a smidgen over.

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On 12/16/2018 at 4:00 PM, Chuck said:

 

I added the horse under the tiller which is typical for the period and as has been discussed numerous times.  This not only follows the two contemporary models that are fully rigged but also contemporary rigging plans.  One great example can be found I believe on page 80 of mays book.

 

The horse was made from 1/16" brass rod (blackened).

Chuck, does the horse have a slight upward curve towards the center? I've seen it flat in some builds and yours looks like it has an upward curve. Does it also curve slightly back towards the transom in the middle? I can't really tell from the photo and it looks like you drilled the holes for it about 1/4" from the transom...? 

 

Thanks,

Bob

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I made it curve up just a little because I would avoid a completely straight horse.  Just for aesthetics.  There is no curve towards the transom.  It is always equal distance from the transom.

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On 12/31/2018 at 6:02 AM, Chuck said:

The shrouds, backstays and forestay were served but only where they are seized around the mast.  The area served extends about 1" below the where it was seized.   This is an optional detail.  You dont have to do this.  But it does look good.

Chuck, I ordered one of your serving machines and it should arrive within a week or so. I've never done any rigging or serving but I'm looking forward to learning to do it. Can you recommend a brand and size of thread to use with your serving machine? Also, does the size of the serving thread change with the size of the rope being served?

 

As always, many thanks,

Bob

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I just use gutteman polyester thread.  I get 100 weight thread the same color at any craft store.   For thinner ropes you can use fly tying thread.

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On 12/16/2018 at 4:00 PM, Chuck said:

I added the horse under the tiller which is typical for the period and as has been discussed numerous times.  This not only follows the two contemporary models that are fully rigged but also contemporary rigging plans.

Chuck, I have a question about the actual operation of the horse and the main sheet. It looks like the main sheet and block would get in the way of the rudder handle when the boom was sheeted in or out and the boom moved from one side to the other because of where the traveler is located with the main sheet and block attached to it. How did the sailor steering the boat with the rudder avoid having the main sheet and block get in the way of the rudder handle?

 

Bob

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Yupp ....but it is still

correct.  This has been discussed to death.   It is the way it was done however....

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3 hours ago, Chuck said:

Yupp ....but it is still

correct.  This has been discussed to death.   It is the way it was done however....

Thanks, Chuck. I haven't figured out how to use the search function to narrow the search down to something very specific. When I search for something I invariably end up with every word being searched for which results in tons of posts that are irrelevant.

 

I know that when I've sailed on my brother-in-laws boat we have to duck under the boom when coming about but the main sheet attaches to the boom much further towards the mast. It's hard to imagine why they did it the way they did on these longboats.

 

Bob

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