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Chuck

Medway Longboat - 1742 -1/2" scale - by Chuck - (FINISHED!!)

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Chuck,

 

I haven't been in ship-mode for quite a while now.  Real life has taken up too much of my time and mental space this year.  I recently returned from a trip to Denmark, where I visited the National Maritime Museum and the Viking Ship Museum.  Feeling my ship modeling interest being rekindling, I thought I'd check in here.  Wow!  I'm quite excited by this longboat kit you're working on.  While I'm hoping to channel my renewed interest into picking up where I left off with my Cheerful build, this longboat looks like it will be a phenomenal kit.  I'm impressed with how much more realistic this larger scale longboat looks, especially when compared to the 1/48 scale boat.  Though I understand the size from the dimensions you've given, I'm having a hard time picturing the actual real world size of this boat.  Any chance you can post a photo with something we can all relate to, like a can or bottle of soda/beer, or coin, or lighter, etc.  I know that's kind of gimmicky, but 1/24 scale isn't something we're used to seeing everyday. :)

 

Thanks, and glad to see after my time away that you're still doing what you do best!

Erik

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Erik....Does this help?   You should join the group.  What would be better to get your ship model juices flowing again.  The new model is abut 15 -16" long for the hull.  Then you have to of course add the mast ...yards and rigging. 😊

 

sizecomparison.jpg

sizecomparison1.jpg

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Yes......more or less.   For a complete kit of all of the parts you will need to complete the hull (including friezes) it would cost $170 -  $175.   That is all cedar with boxwood accents.   

 

I am not sure what the starter package will cost which I originally stated would include the keel parts and frames along with the plans and base board. That was originally going to come in at around $110.  But then folks wanting to scratch the remaining parts including the planking would still need to buy the cedar sheets to complete the hull.  It doesnt make economical sense to have a starter package because after you buy the additional wood sheets you will need, it would end up costing about the same anyway.   But if you guys still want it, I will provide one.  I thought most would see that it doesnt make economical sense and instead would rather have all the laser cut parts anyway.  I am not pricing this kit to far beyond the materials and laser costs.   I want to see more people join the group and build the kit together.

 

The kit has about 25 laser cut sheets and additional strip wood, brass strip, wire and fishing line etc.....and the printed friezes.

 

What do guys think?  I think its quite affordable considering the new 1/2" scale MS kit which is basswood will cost you about $125.   I think its well worth an additional $50 considering the differences in the two kits.

 

The rigging package will follow but in all honesty you guys can get that stuff anywhere....I am thinking another $30 - $35 or so but it depends on the sail materials or silkspan.   But you guys can pick that stuff up anywhere.  Rope, blocks, wire, brass strips, Deadeyes and sail material with a flag.  The original hull kit will come with the rigging and sail plans.

 

Chuck

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Thanks guys.   Its time to make the windlass.  Some people may get nervous about shaping a piece of wood like this.  But if you just take your time and go slow it will go well.   I created templates that will be glued to all four sides of a 3/8 x 3/8" stick of cedar.   I used a glue stick to attach the templates.  Note how the stick is left a bit longer than the templates.  The ends will be rounded eventually to a cone shape.  I will wait to check its fit before I do that and trim each end to fit the space.

 

windlass.jpg

Then the corners were removed and sanded down to match the template as shown below.  I used a sharp #11 blade initially to remove the material quicker.  I shaved off the corners carefully and stopped just short of the line ob the templates.   Then I finished it up with 320 grit sandpaper.  I also drilled the holes for the windlass bars.  I used a #40 drill bit.   

 

windlass1.jpg

The templates were removed easy enough by wetting them down and then they come right off.  I cleaned up the edges a bit by sanding and tweaking the edges until it looked nice and crisp.  Then I used my #11 blade again to carefully square up those holes.  The finished windlass up to this point is below.  Remember that I still have to reduce the ends to a cone shape so the windlass fits inside the brackets along the risers inboard.  That isnt a finished handle for the windlass.  That is just a 3/32" x 3/32" strip test fit in each hole.   I used a boxwood strip which is a hard wood.  It helped to make the square holes nice and crisp.  Just push them into the holes gently.  You can use any square strip this size even a brass strip which I didnt have handy.

 

windlass2.jpg

 

You can see the windlass in the contemporary model below.....next I will be shaping the ends and adding the brackets so it can be installed.

 

halflb3.jpg

 

 

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Hi Chuck,

 

Great work while I've been away. I love the workmanship and the size comparison was real nice to see.

The price point is very reasonable too. At that you better make a whole lot of kits!  

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Chuck; are you still looking for individuals to take part in the build? I'm not a great modeler but would like to be part of the group if space permits. In any event.... this build log is awesome!!!! Moab (aka Allan Glass)

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Thanks Allan.  Anyone can join in.  I will say once more though,   this is not a beginner model project.  It is very challenging.  But its hard for me to judge because I designed the thing.  Having said that,  I am sure that within a group environment there will be much encouragement and many ideas and suggestions to help you problem solve.  That is the power of a group project.   I learn things every day from folks and many of those tricks and tips were used while I built the prototype.

 

Chuck

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Is there a historical relevance to the flag colours? , I have seen blue used as well. The biggest errors that people usually pick up on are:

 

it being mounted upside down;and

changes made as other countries were absorbed into or  joined the union, I am sure the Stars and Stripes has changed similarly.

 

 

If I have interpreted things correctly, a rarity, the one you are showing doesn't seem to have come into use until 1801 however I am sure there are some Union Jack experts on the site who can advise better than me.

Edited by Richmond

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The colour of the flag was based on what Fleet the ship belonged to.

The Admiral of the Fleet chose the colour. It could be Red, Blue, or White.

The Red Cross is the English Flag, or the Flag of St. Andrew. The White 

Cross with Blue back round is the Flag of Scotland.

This is the Union Flag of 1705. The Flag of the Royal Navy, as we know it was

used from 1865 on. The White Flag with the Union Flag in the upper corner and 

the cross of St. Andrew

 

 

 

 

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