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DocBlake

17th Century Battle Station by DocBlake - FINISHED - HMS Mordaunt - 1:32

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I finished planking the upper deck, installed the hatch coamings and the upper hatch and finished off the shot racks.  The upper deck is just sitting in place.  It won't be installed until the guns and details on the lower deck are complete.  It is tight in there!  The 2 hanging knees at the ends will be glued in place once the upper deck is in place.  Next is the guns.

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Thanks guys, and thanks for the "likes""!

 

I spent yesterday assembling the main parts of the gun carriages.  One of us noticed a problem with the fit of the quoins and getting proper elevation of the gun's barrel.  I'll make a mockup of the stool bed and alter it such that the quoin fits.

 

The carriages are boxwood and the wreath is yellowheart.  I used a pencil to darken the recesses of the wreath to give more of a "3-D" effect.

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I'm working on my cannons. I've posted Jeff Staudt's plans for the carriages and you notice that there are two rings attached to the brackets. One is for the breeching line and the other is to hook on the gun carriage tackle . I can't find another example of guns being rigged like that. I think I'l just eliminate the aft-most ring, and orient the eyebolt horizontally, like it's done on virtually every other carriage I've seen.

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Edited by DocBlake

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Hi Dave - 

 

Very nice work on the wreath.  I like the added shadow lines.  They should make it 'pop' when viewed with anything less than a macro lens.

 

Yes, removing the ring would be better with this style of carriage.  The train tackle hooks directly into the eyebolt.

 

Aviaamator - do you know the English translation of the underlined text for the spout detail in the drawing you posted?  I have never seen that particular detail.  My French is not up to the task.  Thanks.

 

Dan

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On 8/25/2018 at 11:10 AM, aviaamator said:

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Petite Manche en toile de la pissotiere: Basically" Small tube of fabric, used to pee". A "Pissotiere" in French (slang) is a device or a place to urinate.

 

Was that for the mates or to eliminate any water that may have flushed the inside decks? I let you decide.

 

Yves

Edited by yvesvidal

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I assembled all the carriages.  I did make some modifications.  I lowered the stool bed and it's support so that the quoins would fit properly.  I also made new transoms that extend down to the carriage base, for ease of construction.  Here's some shots of one of the long cannons with one coat of poly on it.  No cap squares yet!

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Edited by DocBlake

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Hey Don!

 

i used Jax Black for brass, copper bronze.  First degrease with acetone, then etch with muriatic acid.  The blackening is weird.  If you leave the part in the bath too long, all the blackening rubs off.  Best 1 minute at a time, and repeat 2or 3 times to get the color you want.

 

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Yves - 

 

Thanks for the translation.  There is a similar fixture on English ships of the period called a 'pissdale'.  I think I have seen drawings of one on HMS Victory in the book by Longridge. 

 

I had never seen one directly below a gun barrel, but I suppose it makes sense since that space would not be used for anything else, and you wouldn't want the gunners leaving their post or wetting themselves.

 

Be well

 

Dan 

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Aviaamator is correct. It allowed rainwater or water from wave action to drain out of the gunport recess. Thus helping to prevent rot. Pissdales are a totally different fitting on the inside of the bulwarks around the upper deck. A little forward or aft of the waist.

 

Dave :dancetl6:

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Except for the gun port lids all the parts have been fabricated.  Obviously the upper bulwark planking is not yet installed.  Now the model has to be assembled.  The gun deck must be completed before the upper deck is installed because of the tight quarters below.  Rigging the guns would be impossible.  Here's a preview of the model

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Thanks Richard!

 

Don Robinson, one of my collaborators on this project actually produced the barrels as well as the cannons and metal work.  I've used the same technique as Don did to produce barrels and cannon barrels I've made out of wood.  For the barrels, settle on a barrel shape and turn them on a lathe.  Where the hoops are located, score   shallow grooves, also on the lathe.  When the barrels are separated take some black thread or rigging line of an appropriate diameter, dip it in glue and run it in the grooves on the barrel.  When dry, cut off the excess.  If you need wider hoops, do 2 or 3 windings, with the thread laid tightly together, side by side.  Actually pretty simple.

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I have not yet learned how to turn brass cannon barrels.  Don did a fabulous job with what we needed.  You should ask him about this possibility.

 

 

 

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I really like your workmanship. 

I have a question - When blackening the gun barrels, how long do you leave the barrels in the acetone and muriatic acid?

Don't want to make any mistakes.

Thanks.

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