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G.L.

Cross section Fishing Smack by G.L. - Scale 1/20 - POF - approx. 1920 - FINISHED

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Thanks for the reactions, Carl and Patrick.

Hereby I want to express also all my best wishes for a healthy and prosperous 2019 for all followers and likers.

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The deck beams which meet frames are reinforced with iron knees. I make them out of strips of brass (I apologize for the blurry images).

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Nail holes in the knees.

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After they are blackened, I nail them on the deck beam.

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Marking and drilling the nail holes in the hull. I will not fasten the deck beam immediately to the model before I made some progress to the fish hold.

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The fish hold could be divided in small cubus-shaped compartments by mean of removable planks to stow away the fish with ice. In the fish hold stood wooden vertical pillars with slots in it to hold the planks. I will only place some planks to make clear how it was like.

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From the late 19th century on, fishermen who went for a couple of days to sea stored their catch between layers of ice. In those days winter ice was shipped from Norway to our fishery ports. After the first World War fishermen took factory made ice with them. On certain vessels they used some of the fish compartments to store ice. On other boats there was a special insulated ice container on board.   
For this cross section Mr. Verleene relies to the construction of a Flemish (Belgian) fishing vessel. The icebox was made of a slat construction with cork plates in between and that all was covered with galvanized or zinc plates. The box could contain approx. 1200 kg ice.      
I start by making the container sides. They are made off horizontal paneling. To give it all a bit of initial strength I glue a piece of waste paper on the inside of the walls. It will soon be covered by the inner lining of the icebox.

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I don't have to imitate the cork insulation material, I use real cork, namely a wine cork. I saw the cork in slices.

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I glue a cork layer on the edge of the icebox wall.

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The galvanized plates are made of tin-plate.

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The plates were nailed on the slat construction. I imitate the nails by punching them in the plate.

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The tin is a bit too glossy, therefore I rub it in with tiffany patina to give it a zinc look.

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Gluing the plates.

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The ice compartment is entirely plated. The plate right below is corroded due to a bit too long contact with the tiffany patina. I will sand it slightly.

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I am new to this hobby and the forums. It is threads like this that inspire and motivate myself and im sure many others. 

 

This is just amazing. The history lesson at the start and throughout. the detail being put in makes this just a phenominal work of art. 

 

I hope to one day be able to have the knowledge to achieve such a level of craftmanship. 

 

I look forward to what lies ahead. Thank You sir G.L. for this lovely build that i am thrilled to follow 

 

all the best

Berto

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On ‎1‎/‎6‎/‎2019 at 2:16 PM, Adrift said:

I am new to this hobby and the forums. It is threads like this that inspire and motivate myself and im sure many others. 

 

This is just amazing. The history lesson at the start and throughout. the detail being put in makes this just a phenominal work of art. 

 

I hope to one day be able to have the knowledge to achieve such a level of craftmanship. 

 

I look forward to what lies ahead. Thank You sir G.L. for this lovely build that i am thrilled to follow 

 

all the best

Berto

Berto,

 

Welcome on board of this log. The Modelshipwold forum is the place to be when you are interested in maritime history.

Don't praise my craftmanship too much, you will see in other members logs that on this forum real artists are at work.

I wish you much pleasure in following the build of my cross section.

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On ‎1‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 12:21 AM, BANYAN said:

Nice work G.L. , really like the iron (brass) knees 

 

cheers

 

Pat

Thanks Pat!

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Smacks were often equipped with a steam capstan. In the 19th century the capstan was driven by a donkey steam engine which was connected to a gearbox below the capstan with a connecting rod. Later a more effective capstan was developed: the Elliott & Garrod's steam capstan. The steam under pressure could be led immediately from the steam pressure boiler to a gearbox on top of the capstan. This effected less loss of power than with connecting rods. The steam pressure boiler is situated outside the cross section, so I don't have to make it.

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On the other hand, the capstan has to be made, but that is a job for later. On the picture a Elliot & Garrod's steam capstan of a later generation than that on my smack.

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I start with lying the carlings on which will stand the capstan.

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I drill a hole in the middle carling. Through that hole will lead the steam pipe to the capstan.

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I curve a 4 mm brass tube which will lead from the upper deck to the lower deck.

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Below the lower deck the steam pipe goes further horizontally to the engine room more aft. My steam pipe will be cut off at the edge of the cross section. I want to end the pipe with a flange.

Making the flange: drawing the outline on a piece of brass.

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Making a hole in it

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Making the boltholes

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Sawing it out

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Filing of the outline

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Soldering the flange on the pipe.

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Making a mounting bracket.

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The steam pipe is leading along quite a long distance, including more than two meters through the ice cooled fish hold. I can imagine that there will be a significant loss of temperature of the steam. There is nothing told in the practicum about insulation of the steam pipe. During the twenties of last century the health risks of using asbestos were not yet known, so I suppose that the pipe was insulated with a layer of asbestos. I will do it as well on my model. I will of course not use real asbestos but I will try to make a look alike. To do so, I take a roll of gauze bandage.

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I cut some narrow bars of it.

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I wind them around the tube and moisten them with textile glue.

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Then I paint them with white acrylic paint.

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The pipes into their places. The pipe below deck still needs a support for a while until the glue is dry.

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Beautiful craftsmanship! I love the way you explain the assembly and construction process.

And your workshop has this "essence" of the old and traditional wood shops where masterpieces are being created.

 

I will follow with a lot of interest as I love the subject, having started an Emma C Berry kit a long time ago (and never finishing it).

 

Yves

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On 1/12/2019 at 6:21 PM, cog said:

inventive, I really like it

Thanks Carl, Pat, Michael and Yves.

 

Here is the progress of last week:

 

Part 15: The forward compartments.

The area in front of the equipment store (circled part of the plan) consists of a spare nets repository (starboard) and a small warp hauling line store (portside), separated from each other by a central passageway in which is the anchor chain pipe. Those compartments are cut through in my cross section (dotted line on the plan).

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I start with making the anchor chain pipe.  The pipe has a 90° turn to lead trough the bulwark to the chain box. A design of a folding bench is given in the practicum.  The pipe has to be filled with fine sand to prevent it from nodding. The pipe must be heated and folded.

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However my problem is that the practicum is explaining to make a cross section on scale 1/30 and I are making mine on scale 1/20. My pipe has a diameter of 7.5 mm and not the 5 mm for the 1/30 scale. Whatever I try and however careful I am, my pipe is cracking instead of bending.
I consult a modeler colleague who advises me to fill the pipe with melted lead instead of sand.
So I heat the pipe to make the brass soft, melt some lead in improvised melting pot of a tin can and fill the pipe.

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I make now a new attempt to bend the pipe.

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I have now a 90° curve in my pipe. It is far from perfect and the curve is a bit wider than I would like, but I will do with it.
I will melt the lead out of it and finish the pipe.

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The pipe, painted and provided with two mounting brackets and the anchor chain.

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Attaching the pipe into position.

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Preparing to lay the lower deck.

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The deck is laid.

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Placing the profile slats for the bulwarks.

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Placing the bulwark of the spare net store.

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Placing the bulwark of the small warp hauling line store.

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The forward compartments.

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Well done! Hollow brass really is a bitch to bend. I might have tried copper and fabricated a jig like the pipe tool a plumber uses

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On 1/19/2019 at 2:31 PM, cog said:

Well done! Hollow brass really is a bitch to bend. I might have tried copper and fabricated a jig like the pipe tool a plumber uses

Thanks Carl,

 

I didn't think about copper, but it would indeed better bend. Another lesson learned.

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Part 16: Finishing the main deck structure

The deck beams are prepared. The only remaining job is making the carlings and the horizontal knees.
Sawing the knees with the fretsaw and finishing them with the Dremel.

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Knees and carlings placed.

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Some explanation

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Part 17:The outside planking

Time to plank the model at the outside.
I make the division between the garboard strake and the stringers. There will be seven planks, so I measure the distance on the forward frame between the two with a strip of paper.

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I use a fan planking template to determine the seven plank widths on this frame...

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... and mark the division on the frame.

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I do the same on the after frame and start to plank. I work from the sides to the middle and mark the position of the frames on each plank. That will help me later to determine the positions for the tree nails.

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First part completed.

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The whole starboard side planked

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I will leave open two holes in the planking of the port side to give sight on the frames.

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Outside planking completed.

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Before I can start to tree nail, I have to spend an afternoon splitting bamboo and pull the sticks through the draw plate to supplement my stock of tree nails.

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Drilling the nail holes

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and inserting the bamboo nails

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The nailed hull

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After sanding

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Amazing!
изумительно · восхитительно · бесподобно · обалденно · умопомрачительно · божественно · сногсшибательно · потрясно · ошеломительно · головокружительно · удивительно · поразительно · на удивление · впечатляюще · разительно · невероятно · необыкновенно · очень · исключительно · сильно · офигительно · несравненно · фантастически · сказочно · грандиозно · великолепно · замечательно · чудесно · прекрасно · превосходно · дивно · чудно · волшебно · на диво · на славу  · до чего · шикарно · роскошно ·

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my russian is somewhat inexistent aviaamator ...

 

Very well done G.L. - dat ziet er schoon uit! - why didn't you make it so you can look through the hull inside, if I may ask?

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7 hours ago, aviaamator said:


Amazing!
изумительно · восхитительно · бесподобно · обалденно · умопомрачительно · божественно · сногсшибательно · потрясно · ошеломительно · головокружительно · удивительно · поразительно · на удивление · впечатляюще · разительно · невероятно · необыкновенно · очень · исключительно · сильно · офигительно · несравненно · фантастически · сказочно · грандиозно · великолепно · замечательно · чудесно · прекрасно · превосходно · дивно · чудно · волшебно · на диво · на славу  · до чего · шикарно · роскошно ·

Thank you very much Aviaamator, but I do not understand a word of it.

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6 hours ago, cog said:

my russian is somewhat inexistent aviaamator ...

 

Very well done G.L. - dat ziet er schoon uit! - why didn't you make it so you can look through the hull inside, if I may ask?

Thank you Carl,

 

Because there are enough openings in the bulkheads to see the inside.

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Thank you very much Pat, Patrick, Michael, Moab an Mark.

 

@ Mark: If your question is; am I going to paint the hull? Yes, above the waterline it will get a tarred look and below I want to give it a copper paint tint.

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