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Ozark

USS Constitution by Ozark - Revell - Plastic - Scale 1/96

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Hello everyone.

 

 

I am not an experienced modeler buy any means. I did do about 10 car models when I was younger. and then in the 80's I started this same kit, but never finished it.

I'm 62 now, and think I have the discipline to get it finished. but I'm probably going to need help from some of you, so thank you in advance.

Also I must say I am in awe at the quality of some of the ships on this web site. Just amazing some of the stuff you guys are doing. So depending on how this kit goes, I think I would like to try a wooden ship next.

I have spent years sitting and playing computer games, with nothing to show for it. I had a good time doing it, but I want something to show for my efforts. That's not a pixel.

Kit arrived early so here we go.

 

The box art.20180915_111532.thumb.jpg.acefaebb50a683e1960479166ef884cd.jpg

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I almost missed this part, It was taped to the bottom of the box.

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I see that I ended up with these, instead of the other ones that I liked better.

20180915_112231.thumb.jpg.f490fc47fc35ab64b5a0c8e4f74c6c84.jpg

These were to the outside edge of the plastic bag and were damaged.

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The yard arms are slightly bent. Not sure on how to fix that yet. probably warm them up and add some weight to them to make the lay flat until cool?

20180915_121928.thumb.jpg.0e5f6e85959c6be959102e069e76dcbb.jpg20180915_122020.thumb.jpg.0d3d8f29b31d9fe749b9bb65411ba796.jpg

Well that's it for now, I'm off to wash parts, and try not to loose any down the drain. my plan is to use a plastic tub, warm soapy water and let them soak for a few minuets, then lightly, use a large paint brush on them.

 

I hope I have started this log according to the rules

 

Thanks, Ozark  

 

Edited by Ozark

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Nice to see you starting your build log Ozark. I think you will do OK, after all the kit box says 14 +! :huh::D

 

Did you buy it second hand already opened? Seems like a lot of stuff out of place and broken for being new.

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Good to see you are starting your build.  I will be following along.  I was glad to see you have a roll of Tamiya masking tape on your workbench, that stuff works great.  I think I would recommend you shooting a primer on everything that's going to be painted before trying to paint.

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Ozark - best to you and hope it will be smooth sailing for you with this build. Don't rush! Good advice from Tarbrush about using primer on everything before any painting starts. I'm two years in on mine (I get sidetracked with other projects) but Revell did a great job with this model. I'm signing aboard with this one. Cheers!

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Here I have another unhappy surprise.  But I think it will displayed port side facing the front. 

 

20180916_110754.thumb.jpg.d902fddf1653847dc05a76a7cbeea9a5.jpg

Imagna,   no it was a new unopened kit according to the ebay add. It did have plastic shrink wrap on it but that,s fairly easy to redo now days.

 

Is it better to paint the hull haves before gluing them together, or glue it up and fix any imperfections, and then paint? Because right now I have it dry fitted and clamped to together and I can already see spots where I feel it's going to need some spot putty and other spots sanded to make both sides match? 

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Cement together, fix gap and any other flaws, prime and paint.  I also tend to attach any other sub assemblies to the hull before painting, if feasible.

 

HTH,

 

Keith

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Thanks for the quick reply el cid.

 

So In my mind, the way I see it, is that every piece needs to be painted one color or another. Because I really don't want any plastic showing. Is that logic correct?

When you say I should use primer on every thing I paint. Do I want to remove the parts from the sprue and clean up the flashing then paint it primer or can I paint everything on the sprue? This seems like it might be a dumb question, but i'm not sure about the best way to go about it. It seems that I should remove the parts and clean them up. but then I need to figure out a way to hold the part from blowing away, when spraying. I think I'm answering my own question.

 

Thanks for the help, Ozark

 

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I agree with el cid, glue first and prime afterward. 

 

Once you get that done you acn start painting and masking as needed to do the rest of the stuff. 

 

It is safer to paint the small parts while still on the trees but you will need to clean the paint off of the places where they need to be glued to expose the bare plastic in order to make certain you get a good glue connection. You may find it is easier to sometimes glue the part into place and then paint it with a brush. I suppose I am trying to say that there is no single way to do it and sometimes you will need to figure out what works best for you. 

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I usually try to get the major components assembled and prepped before beginning to prime and paint.  I haven't built a plastic sailing ship since I was a little kid (Revel Flying Cloud I think), but for modern ships I'll build the hull and add the deck so I can get good clean joints all around.  I'll also assemble the various superstructure components and clean them up too.  If there's a joint that will need to be cleaned, I'll attach superstructure pieces to the hull before painting everthing together, otherwise I paint the hull and superstructure pieces separately then assemble.  I picked up a trick somewhere along the line whereby you spray your deck color first, then by spraying the hull and superstructure at a low angel (i.e. from below the deck level), you don't need to mask the decks.  Just some touch up with a brush where there is slight overspray or paint "holidays."

 

Very important...where you do paint parts before attaching, you have to scrape or sand the paint off of each surface where the parts meet.  Remember, styrene cement (e.g. Testors liquid) is a solvent that "melts" the plastic parts together.  Paint effectively prevents the chemical reaction from occurring.

 

You're on the right track, thinking ahead and problem solving. 

 

Cheers,

 

Keith

 

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Yes, I tend to agonize over the details to the point where it takes for ever to get things done. I spent the last 2 weeks going thru buying, building, and displaying, the ship before I even bought it. I spent a week looking at model ship building sites before I decided to go ahead with it.

 

Now I need to decide on my mounting options. I work it a commercial cabinet shop, that also makes wood molding. I figure on gluing up a nice piece of something like pecan. to mount it on and then make a plexi glass cover for it. I need to find some pedestals for it now, so I can insert the nut or whatever mounting it takes, before I put in the decks. 

 

Jim, I will have to think about trying to repair that or not. I don't know if I can make it look better or not. I might just make it worse looking.

 

As always thanks for the reply's Ozark 

 

 

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Ozark - don't feel too bad about that window, on my ship, a section of plastic was missing by a gun port.  Like JimRogers mentioned, it can be fixed by using styrene plastic to mend. I recommend running a good strip of tube glue all along the inside seam of the hull to strengthen it. When it comes time to install your decks, you do not want to take the chance of having the hull open up. Depending on how you approach the three-piece gun deck , you may want to glue some styrene plastic sheeting underneath the seams of the deck to prevent them from opening up as well. Here is my hull and display stand. Note: the deformity on the 6th gun port from the stern. I thought this was the way it looked LOL I had to repair it and it was not easy at this point. Those subtle things that pop up as we go! I wish you smooth sailing on this adventure and I'm following along.

 

DSCN3192 - Copy.JPG

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5 hours ago, Ozark said:

 

 

Jim, I will have to think about trying to repair that or not. I don't know if I can make it look better or not. I might just make it worse looking.

 

As always thanks for the reply's Ozark 

Don’t sell yourself short. It is easier than it looks. Just find the correct size replacement, clean up damaged site. Fit replacement and glue it. If you can’t find the exact correct size, remove it all and replace it on both sides.

5 hours ago, Ozark said:

 

 

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Regarding the warped yards, if you struggle to get them straightened out, you might consider replacing them with wooden dowels that you sand to the proper taper. Could be something to consider for the masts, too. One problem with plastic masts/yards is that they bend pretty easily under tension, meaning it can be hard to get the rigging right without deformation, whereas wood is a lot less flexible. Looking forward to your progress on this.

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1 hour ago, Cathead said:

Regarding the warped yards

Another thing about repairing the quarter window and replacing the yardarms is that you get some experience in scratch building and working in wood. Both of these things will help in your next build if you transition over to the dark side and build your next ship from a box of expensive wood strips or even worse, full scratch!:blink::stunned: 

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I noticed that the yard arms are warped in a way that when I glue the two pieces together the warp will cancel each other out. maybe.

 

I have a question about Model Masters Acrylic paint. What do you guy's use to thin it when using a brush. Or do I even need to thin it. I have searched the net and found people use everything from water, alcohol, thinner, windshield washer fluid, I forgot to get the thinner when I bought the paints. I have a can of denatured alcohol in my garage. Can I use that?

 

Am I the only person on this site, that does not have a cutting mat, on my work area?  

 

Thanks for all the ideas guy's I really appreciate them. 

 

Ozark    

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Hi Ozark

I have used virtually all of the methods you describe over the years to thin acrylics except for your can of Denatured Alcohol.

 

The alcohol people refer to when in thinning acrylics is Isopropyl or rubbing alcohol. It can normally be bought in bottles of 70% to 99% denoting the amount of water in the solution.

 

I am not sure what denatured alcohol would do to acrylics. May be a good thing or possibly not. 

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As you can see, I have a very small area to work in, but I will set up a small table next to this area when the time comes. If I need to.

I started cutting pieces to day at work to make a set of shelves about 3 inches deep to mount on the wall above the counter top. that will free up a lot of counter top space, If I can put all the tools and paints and stuff up out of the way.

I think I might have to move the maglamp, over to the front side of the counter top, It will be in the way of the masts when they go on

 

 

20180921_140244.thumb.jpg.2ae5024dec9b77019204bf4723768e7e.jpg


Here i'm ready to paint my first white hull stripe.

20180921_140333.jpg

Edited by Ozark

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You don't necessarily need a cutting mat as long as your work surface is one you're comfortable getting cut, scratched, painted, sanded, etc. One benefit to a proper mat is that it can help blades stay sharp longer, and sharp blades make a lot of work a lot easier. But they're not that expensive and awfully handy. Depending on your location, you don't have to mail order them as box hobby stores like Michaels or Hobby Lobby stock them too (if visiting a store is easier than mail-order; for me it's not).

 

As for the yards and masts, the point to consider isn't just the current warp but how they respond to tension from different directions as you start to rig the model. Plastic bends easily and you have to be extra careful to balance all your rigging tension. Nothing wrong with that and you shouldn't feel pressure to switch to wood, just something to think about as the wood will take more rigging tension before it begins to bend. Balancing the delicate plastic yards will teach you more about the complex nature of keeping a real rigged ship operational!

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Thank's for the reply Eric20180921_143939.thumb.jpg.3af94c662c6947384ab350e7f345f818.jpg

 

Is this thread correct? It is what was in the kit, but I'm not too sure I like the shinny tan colors. I guess I need to know would you guy's use the shinny tan colored thread? 

 

Thanks, Ozark

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Every kit I get the first thing I do is trash the line. Ships did not use modern poly line to rig and the line was not shiny. I purchase all my line from SYREN Ship Company. But that is just me.

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I agree with Jim and if and when I ever get to the stage of rigging on my build. (Hopefully not too far in the future) I will do the same thing and buy the appropriate rigging rope from SYREN. It will cost more and means just throwing away, (Or hoarding) the stuff that came with the kit but there is just no comparison. 

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Just a cautionary reminder about your base plinth - if you use solid pecan, for example, that is edge glued and a channel cut for your plexi; the wood will expand, but your plexi won't.  Veneered plywood with solid, moulded edging is always a good choice when making frameless plexi cases.  

 

Otherwise, I wish you luck on your Connie build.  You're off to a great start!

Edited by Hubac's Historian

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4 minutes ago, Hubac's Historian said:

Just a cautionary reminder about your base plinth - if you use solid pecan, for example, that is edge glued and a channel cut for your plexi; the wood will expand, but your plexi won't.

Thanks for letting me know this. I hadn't thought about it. 

Are you talking about just normal temperature changes? That the wood will change,but the plexiglass will not. I do need a way to secure the top to the base. Any suggestions?

 

Thanks for the reply,s guy's.

 

Thanks Ozark

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Even with a film finish on it, top and bottom, a solid-wood plinth will expand or contract with the ambient changes in humidity, as the seasons change.  A single, solid, quarter-sawn board (name your species) that is large enough for the 1/96 Connie - say 14-16", minimum (I'm really approximating, here!), will expand and contract +/- a heavy 1/16", varying with the species.  Edge glueing smaller width planks to make up that 14-16" helps reduce and equalize that movement, but the gains are not significant and the cost comes with the finished appearance of the base that will show the multi-edge glued planks of the base.  No matter what, the plexi ends of the case will not move at all, to accommodate the expansion/contraction of the base, so eventually (and I imagine rather quickly), the plexi joints will fail and the plexi case will collapse upon your finished model.

 

Many years before I became a woodworker, I had a very reasonably priced case made for my first Soleil Royal.  It was a cabinet-grade ply base, with plain mahogany veneers, and nice sapele, solid edge band.  The perimeter mortise that was cut for the plexi (at the juncture of the solid edge-band) allows some room for ease of installation of the glass (which is heavy!), but also for the minimal movement that one can expect with plywood, even.  After 20+ years, that case is still together and good looking as the day it was made.

Edited by Hubac's Historian

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1 hour ago, Hubac's Historian said:

Even with a film finish on it, top and bottom, a solid-wood plinth will expand or contract with the ambient changes in humidity, as the seasons change.  A single, solid, quarter-sawn board (name your species) that is large enough for the 1/96 Connie - say 14-16", minimum (I'm really approximating, here!), will expand and contract +/- a heavy 1/16", varying with the species.  Edge glueing smaller width planks to make up that 14-16" helps reduce and equalize that movement, but the gains are not significant and the cost comes with the finished appearance of the base that will show the multi-edge glued planks of the base.  No matter what, the plexi ends of the case will not move at all, to accommodate the expansion/contraction of the base, so eventually (and I imagine rather quickly), the plexi joints will fail and the plexi case will collapse upon your finished model.

 

Many years before I became a woodworker, I had a very reasonably priced case made for my first Soleil Royal.  It was a cabinet-grade ply base, with plain mahogany veneers, and nice sapele, solid edge band.  The perimeter mortise that was cut for the plexi (at the juncture of the solid edge-band) allows some room for ease of installation of the glass (which is heavy!), but also for the minimal movement that one can expect with plywood, even.  After 20+ years, that case is still together and good looking as the day it was made.

Thanks for the information. I'm going to have to rethink what i'm going to do.

 

Ozark

 

Edited by Ozark

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Ozark, you're getting bombarded with advice here, hope it's not overwhelming. I think it's important to realize that it's very easy, once you start into model shipbuilding, to go down rabbit holes of upgrading. People will be suggesting that you buy ever more tools, ever more materials, etc. If you have the budget and interest that's fine, but you shouldn't feel obligated or pressured to go off the upgrade deep end. It's perfectly reasonable to build your model with the original yards/masts and the kit-supplied line.

 

That being said, the reason that pressure can exist is because there really is a huge range of material quality out there. A lot of kits/manufacturers use substandard materials to keep the cost down to lure in beginners or just sell more kits. Others start with quality from the beginning. So you'll certainly notice the difference if you upgrade to Syren line (I agree, by far the best out there) but whether or not you do should be up to you and not because anyone else has different standards. I have a couple plastic Revell sailing ships on a shelf that I now think are hopelessly below my current standards, but that virtually every other viewer thinks look great (it helps to live in rural Missouri where no one knows anything about ships). They were built out of the box as a beginner and I have no regrets. If I ever build another plastic sailing model I'll likely discard just about everything but the hull and put in real wood decks, masts, and yards, upgrade the rigging, etc. but I'm not a beginner anymore and trying to do that the first time might well have driven me out of the hobby.

 

Do what you think will make you happy in your current state, and have fun! That's the most important part. If it's stressful, you're missing out.

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Thanks Eric, I love all the advice I can get. 

Now that I have thought about it, that shinny rope will not matter much because at this point, i'm not going to do the sails.

This model is a test to see if I A. have the skills and B. can see good enough, to be able to create some thing nice. But so far i'm having a very good time working on this thing. I love detailing every part to look the best it can. If I do that, when the model is done it should look great.

 

So if I was to replace the three sizes of black rope. Can some one tell me what three sizes, and length I would need? The kit just says small medium and large. My caliper just quit working for some reason, I replaced the battery but still will not turn on.

 

Thanks, Ozark 

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