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Cutter/Mitre Tool - RP Toolz


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Cutter/Mitre Tool
RP Toolz

Catalogue # RP-CUTR
Available from RP Toolz for €85,00

 

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RP Toolz’ Cutter Tool (or Mitre Tool) isn’t really a new idea. There are of course a few manufacturers out there who produce fairly similar tools, and I used to have one of them myself, so when RP Toolz announced that they were releasing their own, I was pretty keen to see it for myself. A mitre tool is designed so that the modeller can produce mitred plastic junctions of specific angles on strips of either flat styrene or shaped section stock, or indeed thin strip wood. If you’ve ever tried to make a 90-degree angle frame, you’ll know how difficult it is to get right if you don’t have the correct tools. The Cutter Tool is designed to ease all of your woes.

 

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This tool is packaged into a robust, corrugated box with a colour product label on the lid. You’ll also notice the weight. There’s some heavy metal in here, and some of the best you’ll see from a tool manufacturer. Unlike some contemporaries who may mould their cutters in some form of plastic, this one is precisely CNC-machined from a very hard grade aluminium, which has also been given a tough matte red anodised finish. The box fits the tool almost perfectly, with an insert used to support the cutter arm. A hex key is provided for changing the blade, as is a second blade with a finer cut. The tool is fitted with a 0.3mm thick blade for regular cutting tasks, with a slightly thinner (0.25mm) blade for something a little finer.

 

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The first thing you notice when exploring this tool is that there is no playin any of the parts. That is, there is no looseness or wobble in either the arm pivot or the two adjustable fences. Those fences are also neatly engraved with degree graduations and the base is marked with a reference point too, in order to align the fences. The bottom edge of the fences is also marked, but in centimetres, with ZERO being at the actual cutting point of the blade. With the fences in their neutral position, an end stop can be positioned so you can cut precise and equal straight-edged lengths of strip. This stop can be removed of course so the fences can be adjusted. It can also be switched to the opposite side of the cutter for maximum flexibility. The stop and both fences are tightened using plastic thumbscrews that cover the metal fixing bolt.

 

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Now, a cutting area really needs a cutting mat, and this is what is fitted to this tool. A self-healing and graduated mat, sits flush with the upper surface of the tool, and proved a hard yet non-damaging surface to the cutting blade. 

 

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I made a small number of cut tests with this tool and found it both precise and effortless. 

 

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Conclusion
RP Toolz’ arsenal of quality modelling tools is certainly expanding, and like those before it, the sheer quality of this really does demand the price asked of it. This is no flimsy or inaccurate tool, but one with which you can work with total precision in producing either angled lengths of styrene, or equal, multiple lengths too. If you like to scratch-build or even just improve on what a kit supplies, then this could well be of interest to you. This is the very best of the mitre cutting tools that I have ever seen, without a doubt.

 

My sincere thanks to RP Toolz for the review sample seen here. To purchase directly, click the link at the top of the article.

 

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Have to agree, somewhat pricey.
The cutting mat will be subject to a lot of wear at the point where the razorblade descends, even if it's "self-healing".  That will eventually result in a ragged cut.  If the cutting mat is square and can be rotated, that'll quadruple its useful life, but are RP Tools offering spare cutting mats as well as spare blades?

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On 9/21/2018 at 1:40 PM, probablynot said:

Have to agree, somewhat pricey.
The cutting mat will be subject to a lot of wear at the point where the razorblade descends, even if it's "self-healing".  That will eventually result in a ragged cut.  If the cutting mat is square and can be rotated, that'll quadruple its useful life, but are RP Tools offering spare cutting mats as well as spare blades?

The blade doesn't seem to come down much more than on the horizontal, so there's minimal chance of the mat being chewed. I've not tried lifting the mat to rotate it. I'd have to ask the manufacturer if removal/replacement is possible. As for price, with RP Toolz stuff, you really do get what you pay for. I've been using their tools for a number of years in my magazine publication work.

 

 

12 hours ago, mtaylor said:

Aluminum?  That sounds like a great idea and so much more robust and accurate than the plastic ones which are crap.   

It's supposedly a real tough grade of aluminium and it's quite heavy too. Superbly constructed. 

 

11 hours ago, Seventynet said:

Do you know if those are generic type blades that one could get in several places or are they specific to this product?

Not sure. I can't see them being specific to this. I think the cutter will have been designed around the blade.

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Machining costs money, but still it is quite a bit of money compared to some other tools. One point I found irritating is that the graduation of the two fences is on their top only, while the reference mark is only on the surface of the cutter. This will make it impossible to really set the fences precisely due to the unevitable parallaxes. Likewise, it would have been good, if the millimetre graduation would extend down the sides of the fences. For the same reason as above it will be difficult to measure precisely stuff that is thinner than the fences are thick.


Aaahh, and I don't like red tools ...

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