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Wallace

HMS Victory by Wallace - Corel SM 23 - 1:98 Scale

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Nice work on the coppering there Sir, she's looking good.

 

Just a thought on the square punch; you could make one out of pieces of razor blade stuck around a block of wood.....

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6 hours ago, fmodajr said:

Nice work on the coppering!

 

What are you using for glue, if you don't mind my asking??

 

Thanks,

Frank

Frank,

The tape has an adhesive backing and sticks very well to the primed hull.

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3 minutes ago, nikbud said:

Nice work on the coppering there Sir, she's looking good.

 

Just a thought on the square punch; you could make one out of pieces of razor blade stuck around a block of wood.....

Now THAT is an idea mate, they would be sharp enough too. I shall fabricate one and do a test punch.

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Posted (edited)

Wednesday, April 03, 2019:

Coppering Continues……

 

Slowly, slowly, and little by little. As this is the final finish on this part of the hull I am going to take my sweet time getting it done.

 

image.png.10f9931888e87ac993dca25082820b6e.png

image.png.44ca48f8b4257d760ae058fca9ad2909.png

 

I will be back in the shipyard this weekend for more fun and games. Until then........

Edited by Wallace
Spelling correction

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6 hours ago, VictoryGuy said:

It's looking great! All that patience and detail work is definitely paying off.

Thank you sir, I appreciate the feedback. 

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12 hours ago, Patrick Haw said:

Looking very nice!  Well done.  Coppering is a "rite of passage" for us all.  You are well on the way to membership in the exclusive club of those who have coppered Victory and lived to tell the tale!

 

Patrick

Wow, thank you Patrick. I must say I am honored and those words will help me through the hours still to come that will be needed to complete her. I am so much looking forward to seeing how she looks and am very excited about it. 

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3 hours ago, Kevin said:

three times i did the gun ports, till i got it semi ok then redid the lanyards 3 times before i ripped them out again to put the sheaths in place 

It was worth it Kevin, they look great!!

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The shipyard has been very quiet this week due to my work schedule. The good thing is the Admiral and I are traveling down to North Carolina this weekend. While we are there I will hopefully be getting some much needed images of the shrimp trawlers for the scratch build I am planning. The Admiral has requested a shrimp trawler and it all begins this weekend. I will be setting up a specific build log once I have a bit more to post about it guys. 

My schedule next next week doesn't look too strict, looking forward to some downtime in the yard. 

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Posted (edited)

Wallace. You have started the most boring stage of work.😊 Fortunately, I already have it behind me. In my humble opinion, however, you should put the copper plates in a different way.

 

 

1)      At the Victory, the cooper plates were laid in two belts, of which the upper belt consists of 12 rows of plates. Only 5 bottom rows of the upper belt are in contact with the stem, while the remaining 7 rows are in contact with the waterline.

2)      The copper plates on the sides are laid horizontally, corresponding more or less to the layout of the planks. In each row the plates are arranged in such a way, that the upper edge of the lower plate overlaps the lower edge of the plate above and the rear edge of the plate closer to the bow overlaps the front edge of the plate closer to the stern. This means that the plates should be laid from the stern towards the bow and from the waterline towards the keel. You have started laying plates from the keel to the waterline.

3)      Before laying the plates on the sides, they should be placed on the stern stem so that the side plates can overlap the stern stem plates. Copper plating of the keel and stem must be made as the last.

4)      Plates fixed to the keel shall be laid parallel to the waterline and the plates arranged on the vertical part of the stern stem should be arranged perpendicular to the waterline. The plates laid on the stem and on the keel should overlap the plates previously laid on the sides. Laying the plates on the keel should also be started from the stern. The plates laid on the bottom part of the keel and on the front edge of the both stems are gently curled on the side plates.

5)      It should be noted, that the arrangement of plates fixed on both stems does not coincide with the rows of plates on the sides, i.e. they do not constitute an extension of the rows of side rows.

 

Laying the copper plates on the Victory, the top belt consisting of 12 rows of plates should be placed as the first. Next, the rows of plates from the lower belt should be laid, starting of course from the stern. At the bow, these plates will rise up, so you have to cut them. But enough to play a wise guy.😉 The decision as to how to make the coppering is of course Yours. If you want, you can look how I coppered the hull and what were the problems with it. https://modelshipworld.com/topic/402-hms-victory-by-paragraf-%E2%80%93-shipyard-%E2%80%93-card-%E2%80%93-196/page/3/

I hope my mistakes will help you lay the copper plates properly.

Edited by Paragraf

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5 hours ago, Paragraf said:

I hope my mistakes will help you lay the copper plates properly.

 

Thanks for the input sir, and I appreciate you pointing that out to me. When I get the opportunity to get in the shipyard I shall check how my plan compares to what you have written. Your build looks very clean by the way, have you continued with her?

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Posted (edited)

Wallace. Yes, I'm continuing my build. Unfortunately, the work goes slowly because the day is too short to work at the model every day. Now I'm making the wales and preparing the hull for painting.

 

By the way, the description of coppering the hull is based on the Longridge's and McGowan's books.


 
Edited by Paragraf

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11 hours ago, Paragraf said:

By the way, the description of coppering the hull is based on the Longridge's and McGowan's books.

Yep, I chased that down too. I did manage to find the sheathing pattern in an excerpt from Alan McGowan's book on an English model forum. Here are the images from the book concerning the pattern:

1484674250_CopperPlatingPatternstern.thumb.JPG.e4f86997b4b27edc0e2d9c5bb16c63c5.JPG

790447460_CopperPlatingPattern.thumb.JPG.7ca46b10bdc884f1d1954906049cc88a.JPG

I have not gone too far into the coppering process to have done too much "damage" to the correct pattern. I shall adjust my strategy accordingly. Thanks again for pointing this out sir, much appreciated.

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Posted (edited)

Wallace. If I can add something to what I have already written, it would be good if you drew the lines on the hull before coppering.  These lines will set the course of individual rows of copper plates and what is important, will show how the copper plates will be arranged at the stern part of the hull. This will allow you to avoid the mistake I made and I had to correct it.

 

I draw the individual rows using the pressboard strip with a width slightly smaller than the width of the copper plate. This width is smaller due to the overlap that needs to be made. Only the first row, this one at the waterline, must have the same width as the width of the copper plate because it is not overlap on any row above or below. I applied this strip to the hull and marked on it the course of each row of plates. In this way I saw how they are arranged, whether they will be arranged parallel to the keel and how they are arranged on the stern.

 

 

Edited by Paragraf

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15 hours ago, Paragraf said:

it would be good if you drew the lines on the hull before coppering.

I have already printed out the sheathing pattern from Alan McGowans book to enable me to do just that! Thanks :)

 

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Update time.... I am looking forward to a good day in the shipyard tomorrow, my first full day off with nothing else going on for a good while now. I am planning on transferring the sheathing pattern from my printouts onto the hull so that I can get on with the coppering process (images tomorrow).

I am also thinking about how I will support the hull without ruining the sheathing once the coppering is complete. I have seen ships stands that support the hull nicely and don't actually touch it. This will require drilling 4 holes into the hull to add pin supports and fabricating a base to fit. It basically lifts the hull free to "float" on the 4 pins. If anyone has any design ideas or has had any experience doing this I am all ears. I shall make some rough sketches tomorrow to explain. Until then Gentlemen.

 

 

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I’ve never had problems with copper sheathing being damaged on the cradles of the two that I’ve coppered.  I just sealed the hull first, before putting the model back in its cradle.  Just keep glue away from the coppering, that’s important (I may or may not have learned the hard way).

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