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Tecko

BRIDGE ON RIVER KWAI

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On 10/27/2018 at 9:46 AM, Tecko said:

. . . Gluing the piers in place. Minder realized I made an error after I glued the stabilizing crossbeams at the top. Can you spot it?

EC6dWLi.jpg

The elastic band cannot be taken off unless cut.

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7 hours ago, Tecko said:

Pier braces were notched and inserted. Minder is complaining about poor condition of the notch. I blamed the tools, of course.

 

Minder seems to me a demanding little man, but I like him.

 

G.L.

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Ha ha ha. He is indeed straight to the point.

@G.L.

_____________________

Added the two outer girders and remaining cantilever braces.

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Shaped and installed tapered cantilever supporting arms.

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Minder is on top of bridge. It gives an idea of scale.

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Added similar arms to top portion, but these are made from two bamboo skewers (tapered).

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Adding smaller support arms.

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Edited by Tecko

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3 hours ago, wefalck said:

Coming on nicely. Have you actually any idea how the wooden members were connected to each other ? They must have had iron fastenings, I suppose.

Here are the only picture I could find. The long piece was used for keeping planks from lifting. The others may be to do with rail tracks. I am sure they used iron pins.

1Iw3Tlx.jpg

All I am going to use is a pencil mark. Will explain later.

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WWfRFCc.jpg

Minder is telling me to keep verticals square.

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I want to show the POWs working on the bridge. To do so requires the bridge to be incomplete.

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While adding short crossbeams I used a pencil mark/point for me to align with. It was then when I realized it looked like an iron pin. So I made several points with the pencil to see what it looks like. I liked it, and will do this to all the joints.

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Minder is showing off again. When I told him to use a harness, his defiant remark was, "Before this job I was a tight-rope walker!".

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Cantilever towers completed.

Edited by Tecko

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Thanks fellow modelers, your positive reactions is much appreciated.

____________________

Here, the POWs are building a trestle bridge. In my research I have sought to find out if they used saw pits, but all to no avail. In this photo, I am wondering if they used the bridge trestles to saw these girders.

jMRAePI.jpg

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Good question.   What was the ground like? Muddy? Sandy?   I can't imagine digging a saw pit in either of those.  They might have used just a simple stand of two timbers tied together in an "X".    From the photos, it looked like the wood was debarked also. 

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43 minutes ago, wefalck said:

I remember seeing in my youth such iron clamps being used in wood constructions, e.g. scaffolding. I think they are used to connect members in the same plane, e.g. in girder construction.

This is a sketch done by one of the POW who worked on the bridge. Note bottom portion of image.

Up8MxVQ.jpg

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Thank you for this wonderful build. Using the figures to show scale really helps capture the size of this incredible undertaking.The background info, photos, etc. capture the reality of the suffering the prisoners endured....especially for me whose only record of the history was the movie. Thanx again...Moab

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From that paintings, sketches so far, the timber was also shaped by either saw or axe. Taking all of them in shows the timbers were sided and relatively the same shape.  Just raises more "how did they do that" questions.   No record of a sawmill, hand tools... maybe much like the shipwrights of old then.

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3 hours ago, philo426 said:

Great build and you are progressing quite rapidly.Perhaps you can lay some HO Track across it and run a small steam loco across it!

Ah, that is a problem, and it has been for previous model builders of this bridge; especially if using a kit build.

 

HO would be too large. It turns out that the real rail width is about 33 inches, at 1/150 scale (model scale) is 0.22" or 5.5 mm. This is close to Z gauge (6 mm), though Z scale is 1/220. A closer scale is 1/160 (N scale) but that rail gauge is 9 mm. That is why previous models, using N scale track gauge looked odd and too large.

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Besides this, the track width (4-5"), at 1/150 scale, is 0.03" (less than 1 mm).

Look at the tracks in below photograph. The vehicle platform is at same height as the tracks.

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Conclusion: I am not using any commercially available model tracks, gauge or scale, but making my own. No train on the tracks. But may use rail trolley (scratch-build). This model is to be incomplete so as to show POW still building the bridge; no train going across it.

Edited by Tecko

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1 hour ago, mtaylor said:

From that paintings, sketches so far, the timber was also shaped by either saw or axe. Taking all of them in shows the timbers were sided and relatively the same shape.  Just raises more "how did they do that" questions.   No record of a sawmill, hand tools... maybe much like the shipwrights of old then.

The Thai-Burma railway is 415 km long. Along that distance where many POW camps building the railway basically at the same time. So, the digging, filling-in earth, cutting lumber, etc must have occurred around each camp. I know that the tools they used were very primitive, even for that time period.

 

Track rails had to be hauled from resource point, laying track along the way. Sleepers were also hauled in, if not cut in situ. Perhaps a few camps specialized in what they were enslaved to do, such as cutting sleepers.

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34 minutes ago, philo426 said:

Sleepers are what the Brits call railroad ties.John Lennon in Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,however ,sang of looking glass ties rather than sleepers despite his UK background.

I did not know that. Thanks for sharing.

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I sandwiched the rail tracks with two more girders (4 mm dowel). Then laid in matchsticks for supporting railroad ties (sleepers).

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Then I cut strips of 1 mm plastic sheet for railway ties. Chopped them up, glued into place, and painted a fresh cut timber colour to them.

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Next day, I cut strips fine strips from the same sheet for track rails. Used a block of wood, cut at 5 mm, for gauging the rail while gluing.

Then I masked and painted the rails a brown-grey colour. later, added silver colour to the paint mix, and wiped that across the top of the rails.

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Vehicle pathway and balconies.

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Cur strips of 1 mm sheet plastic for joists and handrails. Cut, drilled, and filed half the joists for hand rail posts.

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THANKS FOR WATCHING. Much appreciated.

This build has come to an intermission.  I am now putting all my time into completing the Wardell Bridge build. Hope to see you there.

RXvNqaa.jpg

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@mtaylor

Found more information about the lumber.  The Burma railway is 415 km long. POW camps were strung along the whole distance. Midway is the only camp designated for cutting timber. Most probably all the sleepers come from there, at least. Other cut timber was done on site, as revealed by following images.

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