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Valeriy V

Cruiser Varyag 1901 by Valeriy V - scale 1:75

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22 hours ago, Dr PR said:

Valeriy,

Beautiful work! I love working with brass and solder, and you are doing an excellent job!

 

Phil, thanks for the helpful info. :) 

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Colleagues, I need help.

I am looking for a drawing or high-quality photograph of a 750 mm searchlight that was installed on ships of the US Navy at the beginning of the 20th century.

The same spotlights were on Varyag.

P1.jpg

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12 hours ago, KeithAug said:

Valeriy, Nice brackets - I would have been inclined to machine them in a line along the edge of a piece of square bar - any reason why you chose to make them by milling the end of a piece of round bar?

Keith, everything is simple - I don’t have a square bar of suitable section size.  :) 

225.jpg

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23 hours ago, Valeriy V said:
On 10/21/2019 at 10:04 AM, KeithAug said:

Valeriy, Nice brackets - I would have been inclined to machine them in a line along the edge of a piece of square bar - any reason why you chose to make them by milling the end of a piece of round bar?

Keith, everything is simple - I don’t have a square bar of suitable section size.  :) 

 

I have also found that round bar is usually harder that square bar regarding the machining quality. What I am trying to say is that often I find the square bare to be less easy to machine than the hard  free machining round bar.

Beautiful work on the model Valeriy.

 

Michael

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There is a German, who wrote a whole book around the strategy of milling pieces from round bar. He often uses fly-cutters, which has the advantage that one can also make easily form-cutters, a technique commonly use in milling watch- and clock-wheels in an artisanal way. In fact, I built my micro-milling machine for exactly that purpose.

 

Milling from round bar, can be a bit wasteful in terms of materials use, but has the advantage that once you set up the machine and made yourself a sketch for the machine movements, you can churn out easily any number of identical pieces. This can be a challenge, when clamping rectangular stuff in a vice.

 

Getting good-quality brass for machining seems to be not so easy, often the stuff is too soft. For very small pieces I sometimes resort to brass nails. The stamping process work-hardens the material and thus makes it stiffer and easier to machine.

 

Finally, round brass bar seems to be cheaper per weight, than square bar, which outweighs the waste, which is minute anyway at these dimensions.

 

 

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4 hours ago, michael mott said:

I have also found that round bar is usually harder

 

17 minutes ago, wefalck said:

often the stuff is too soft

I think we all agree that the problem is the degree of work hardening. As with all soft metals the issue is that the cutter has a tendency to push the metal out of the way rather than cutting it. I may just be fortunate to have a stock of brass square and rectangular bar which seems to cut well. 

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I just went though the whole build log so far, and am in awe of your skills, Valeryi 👍 !

Ans just as well, I appreciate your openness to share techniques. I can say I have learnt a lot reading this thread.

 

As for the choice of subject, I just love pre-dreadnoughts, and believe the Russian fleet was the most homogenous fleet of pre-dreadnought ships, in terms of appearance and looks. Nothing like the French "Flotte d'échantillons", nor the various experiments the US and British Navies were doing at that time, which resulted in different-looking ships in the time-span. Varyag was certainly a handsome-looking ship.

 

I will continue to follow your build with trepidation.

 

Hubert

 

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8 hours ago, wefalck said:

Milling from round bar, can be a bit wasteful in terms of materials use, but has the advantage that once you set up the machine and made yourself a sketch for the machine movements, you can churn out easily any number of identical pieces. This can be a challenge, when clamping rectangular stuff in a vice.

I completely agree with you. And with the author of the book from Germany .... :) 

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7 hours ago, Hubert Boillot said:

I just went though the whole build log so far, and am in awe of your skills, Valeryi 👍 !

Ans just as well, I appreciate your openness to share techniques. I can say I have learnt a lot reading this thread.


 

  Hi Hubert!
I am glad that my reports will help you. Join us and we will build steam fleet models together. :) 

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7 hours ago, Hubert Boillot said:

As for the choice of subject, I just love pre-dreadnoughts, and believe the Russian fleet was the most homogenous fleet of pre-dreadnought ships, in terms of appearance and looks. Nothing like the French "Flotte d'échantillons", nor the various experiments the US and British Navies were doing at that time, which resulted in different-looking ships in the time-span. Varyag was certainly a handsome-looking ship.

To my regret, the Russian fleet of that period was a collection of ships with technical characteristics that were very different from each other. Therefore, it is impossible to call the Russian fleet balanced, this is one of the reasons for the tragedy of defeat.

 

Although undoubtedly the ships were beautiful. :) 

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14 hours ago, FriedClams said:

Wonderful work Valeriy.  I am always impressed by your splendid metal work.  The wheelhouse and its details are very nice indeed.  I’m looking forward to seeing how your brackets will be used.

Thank , Gary!
 They are intended for fastening davits and soon I will show them in action. 

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