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Valeriy V

Cruiser Varyag 1901 by Valeriy V - scale 1:75

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13 hours ago, KeithAug said:

Very clean work Valeriy, I wonder how you keep the soldering so neat?

Keith , when soldering with tin, I use a thin soldering iron tip and after soldering I carefully clean the traces of solder.

231.JPG

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12 hours ago, wefalck said:

Impressive metal-work on the davits. I gather you used some sort of jig to keep everything together, while soldering ?

No, I did not use the template. A simple soldering process has been applied here.

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233.JPG

234.JPG

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Valeriy, beautiful workmanship on the rail assembly. Have you been using heat sinks or different temp solders for the sequencing of the assembly? I understand the small tip in order to transfer heat to a small area if the soldering iron is of a high enough wattage, but will so many small items so close together and the melt point of the solder having a range even a small one I am wondering about the heat transfer to previously assembles parts.

 

Thanks Michael

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5 hours ago, michael mott said:

Have you been using heat sinks or different temp solders for the sequencing of the assembly? I understand the small tip in order to transfer heat to a small area if the soldering iron is of a high enough wattage, but will so many small items so close together and the melt point of the solder having a range even a small one I am wondering about the heat transfer to previously assembles parts.

 

Thanks, Michael !

In this assembly, I did not use any heat dissipation devices. I applied a simple scheme of sequential actions - initially massive metal parts are welded together and only after that small parts are soldered. In a short time of soldering smaller parts, the remaining larger ones do not have time to heat up very much. Therefore, the parts do not fall apart from overheating.

 

A special role is played by the composition of the solder:  Sn - 50%   Pb - 32%   Cd - 18%

This solder spreads very quickly in the right direction and this nuance allows you to reduce the heating time of the surrounding parts, protecting them from overheating.

 

With this soldering, I mainly use a 30W and 60W soldering iron, very rarely 80W. And only the sharp tip of the soldering iron.

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You have been busy modeling since your last postings in October and what beautiful modeling it is!  Your davits and rail assembly are wonderfully made - an intimidating quantity of fragile pieces to solder up.  Beautiful work Valeriy!

 

Gary

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On 10/31/2018 at 2:27 PM, Valeriy V said:

Everything is simple:
- 10 free nights in front of the computer
- 10 YouTube video tutorials
- desire to learn     :) 

Impressive!

 

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On 3/17/2020 at 4:40 AM, ajromano said:

 (Political remark here) 😉

 

 

There is no policy, only mutually beneficial trade!  :)  ;)  

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2 hours ago, wefalck said:

So, how did you make the cowls ? Galvanoplastic ?

Yes, Eberhard, these parts are made using electroforming.

 

The wax mold is coated with a conductive layer of graphite and lowered into a galvanic bath. I already told the details in my topic above.

241.JPG

242.JPG

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Elegant way of forming the cog-wheel and the pinion by knurling. I probably would have cut them the hard and traditional way, as watchmakers do.

 

I don't understand, where the drive goes to and what the lever does. Is this a double bevel-gear drive that leads then down inside the ventilator ?

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1 hour ago, wefalck said:

I don't understand, where the drive goes to and what the lever does. Is this a double bevel-gear drive that leads then down inside the ventilator ?

The lever is needed to rotate the gear axis, it is removable.

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