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Scottish Maid by mispeltyoof - FINISHED - Artesania Latina - scale 1:50 - Rod Buckle


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On 11/11/2018 at 10:42 AM, mispeltyoof said:

Vince P .In response to you ? Re workdesk,it is a computer desk though not that 'fancy" it's a solid pine desk that can be bought as self assembly on line for £100. The work station at the end is by Ochre I believe and was £50 for Cornwall ships. 

A massive purchase for me as it cost nearly more than my Scottish Maid kit.

Thanks for the info mate. It sure looks efficient and neat. Also glad you decided to stick it out here. We are a great group and do help each other out immensely. I for one have been building models for decades, and I learn something new every time I log on.

 

Vince P. :dancetl6:

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Coming along nicely!

 

Frankly, I'm not sure what the pins are for.  I know some people like to hammer the planks in with pins.  I think if you have good wood glue (personally, I'm not a big fan of CA/super glue), you just need some method to keep the planks in place while the glue dries.  For me, the pliers are a quick and easy way to keep the planks against the bulkheads while the glue dries.  Then when done, I just pull the pins out.  You don't have to push the pins in very far as you can see from my LAR build:

 

 

I've also tried these planking screws from Micromark.  They do the job, but are really hard on the fingers (the knurled knobs are rough, especially when trying to screw them into tough bulkheads).  Others have made their own based on similar design principles.

 

https://www.micromark.com/Planking-Clamps-10

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16 hours ago, Landlubber Mike said:

I've also tried these planking screws from Micromark.  They do the job, but are really hard on the fingers (the knurled knobs are rough, especially when trying to screw them into tough bulkheads).

The idea with those is that you drill a hole about 2/3 the diameter of the thread first to make them easier to screw in.

 

Danny

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Posting my "car crash" planking to share with others like me who see the wonderful builds on here and despair of their own efforts. I have decided then rather then fill the in enivitable gaps with filler I'll do what the original makers did and fill the gaps with slivers of lime wood.

Hopefully it can only get better 🤞

IMG_2769.JPG

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4 hours ago, mispeltyoof said:

Posting my "car crash" planking to share with others like me who see the wonderful builds on here and despair of their own efforts. I have decided then rather then fill the in enivitable gaps with filler I'll do what the original makers did and fill the gaps with slivers of lime wood.

Hopefully it can only get better 🤞

IMG_2769.JPG

If is that bad,  why don't you just double plank it. Use a thin layer of about 0.5mm x 5.0mm walnut over the first layer. Many kits are double planked for just this reason. The first layer is course to cover frames. Then second layer is easy to apply and will look good. 

Vince P. 😁

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My naive attempt to forego filler went by the board as thin gaps appeared when sanding. She has gone from looking like firewood to actually looking more like a ship now:) Had many problems fitting bulwarks and waterways but now fitted and ready for detail filing/sanding to finalise a  closer fit.

I'm in a dilemma as to wether to fit the keel before or after my second walnut planking. I will surely need to do some filling to ensure a perfect fit between the keel and false keel. Do I risk marking my planking with the filler or plank over the top of the sanded filler?

I have only experience of two kits but must say how superior the Artisan kit is ( but twenty plus years old so may be a better quality than now) to the new Billings Bluenose I have finished. The wood is higher quality and more plentiful plus there is no plastic to be seen. The Billings had many plastic parts. Including dead eyes which were badly formed and poor quality wood.

IMG_1636.JPG

IMG_2788.JPG

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Looking good, you have overtaken me. I have had very little time in the last few weeks.

 

Cannot tell from the pictures, but are there holes in the deck or have you marked the positions for where the masts go?

 

I think I see various items of deck furniture on your lamp stand.

 

Glenn

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As I work on the "Maid" beginning to recognise mistakes and what is needed.

Relooking at my deck planking I would like to get the joints lined up correctly and reproduce caulking between them. I'm going to replank on top as I wouldn't ever be happy knowing I could do better.

Saw on a build log on here that the builder had used black paper but I can't work out what he means. Any advice on caulking or is it just a matter of painting the edges? Any advice greatfully received as always

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Glenn

I marked the holes in the deck as I thought the reinforcing wooden blocks  would be easier to find when the time comes.

I did build a couple of pieces of deck furniture whist waiting for glue to set:))

 My next build will also be HMS Snake when I can afford it:)

I was inspired by Steve  Priske's video on YouTube of his commisioned build of HMS Snake

Edited by mispeltyoof
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RE the black paper caulking.  He probably glued black paper strips on the edges of his planks.  (Just one edge, as the "other" side of the plank receives it's caulking from its neighbor plank).  I think the easiest and safest way to caulk is by coloring the edges with a graphite pencil.  

 

Alan

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I think caulking is a bit suck it and see. I do not think that colouring the edge looks very even, especially if the wood is not good quality. Then again gluing paper to the edges is very difficult with very thin planks, not really practical with anything less than 1mm. On my last model, with 0.6mm planks, I tried gluing cotton between the planks as I laid them. I think this was reasonable, but not easy to do the ends. Also you have to be very careful not to sand the thread when sanding the deck, otherwise it frays and looks terrible.

 

When I get to it on my Scottish Maid, I am going to replace the supplied wood with some 1mm planks I have and try sticking black paper to the edges. I have not tried this method before. Though I am a bit worried about how to scale it will look - use thin paper.

 

I would suggest that if you have any spare wood you try it out somewhere off the model. You could then compare the different methods and see what you like. If you have not seen it, try reading this article:  http://modelshipworldforum.com/resources/Framing_and_Planking/Deck_PlankingIIbuttshifts.pdf.

 

Glenn

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39 minutes ago, lmagna said:

Do you have a product number for the dark Elmers Jack?

Label on bottle reads "Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Glue" "for Dark Woods"  - no product number that I can find but the UPC code on back is 26000 00710

 

Says it is good for walnut, oak, cherry and other dark woods. Mine is a 4 oz bottle.  In the bottle, the glue is about the same color as chocolate milk.

 

Edited by Jack12477
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