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I have come across a couple of references recently about the use of an iron when planking with PVA.

 

I dont like CA and PVA has aways meant clamping which is a nuisance - and in my Pickle build some greif!

 

So I bought myself a very cheap small steam travel iron to run some tests and it works ! 

(Much  handier than  the Admirals iron - and  would you dare ask yours for a loan of her iron  to stick things !) !

 

I followed broadly the description in other logs and the video of the MK Phoenix build https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3MmCMmNK2s

 

I found it"tacked" the end of a PVA 'd strip very quickly and then I found I could run along the strip positioning as I went - NO CLAMPS OR PINS!!

 

I also tried just "ironing" a strip or two to see how it helped bending and that worked quite nicely too  - rather like the hair drier method,

 

Tried bending with steam on too which worked  a bit faster and more smoothly but of course would then need drying and allowing to shrink.

 

Tried removing and re positioning old stuck strips -  looks possible but needs some more trials.

 

I was using Walnut and lime and neither showed any signs of scorching though I was using the 1000w iron full on.

 

Worth some more investigations . Has anybody got any advice or comments ?

 

Edited by SpyGlass

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Sure, a small travel iron solves the only real drawback to a full sized one. The only other problem is that it has a flat surface. That can be endured, however. That said, if anybody wants my old Ralt RA5 Aeriopiccola plank bending iron, "they'll have to pry it from my cold dead hands!" :D

 

The operative function in bending wood is transferring heat to the wood. If that's accomplished, you've got it. (Adding steam or boiling water to the mix only serves as a heat transferring medium.) The advantage of the old Aeripiccola irons is that the heating element is shaped like a French curve (there's a technical name for the shape, which I can't remember... a spiral curve of sorts... I think it has something to do with the Fibonacci numbers... it's been a long time...) and has a small bail at one end to hold the end of the strip of wood while the other end is bent around the curve to the degree of bend required. You can't do that with a flat iron, though.

 

plank-bender-wood-ship-model-building_1_

Edited by Bob Cleek

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This highlights a problem we have with many glues when double planking.

Some kits recently have perfectly cut out second layer planks using the magic of computer drafting and lasers.

I found CA problematic when making even small errors and pinholes couldn't be closed by a drop of water.

PVA made the thin veneer cup and cup and cup and the pin count shot up... frustrating.

Having burned  myself many times with the tiny irons used to cover model airplanes, a bigger iron at full steam....

Single planking is not so bad if you are willing to putty and paint but maybe it's back to block models.

How many wood duck decoys are double planked:-)

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TINY IRONS USED TO COVER MODEL AIRPLANES !!!!! 

Do tell us more !!!

 

Actually this little one I have seems ok - I am getting the hang of it ! -only burnt myself twice today  and that was because i was trying to steam bend a strip!

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For what the OP is discussing; tacking the end of a strip to the hull and following along the length of the strip, I've been using this:

 

Versa Tool

 

Iron.jpg.6ff0dee9f6794a2d2887b1ff19de4ef0.jpg

 

 

It's basically a soldering iron with a temp control.  Adjust temp for no smoke.

 

I use the tip that is circled with red.

Edited by Gregory

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On 1/19/2019 at 1:59 PM, SpyGlass said:

Worth some more investigations . Has anybody got any advice or comments ?

No recommendations or advice other than what you have already found out but I did pretty much the same thing a few months ago with much the same results.

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Even these little irons that are used to apply heat-shrink foils on model-aircraft may be too big. A cheap solution would be to use a temperature-regulated soldering iron (or use a suitable dimmer in the line) and a copper soldering-tip that you can bend/forge into the shape needed. Actually, you can insert any metal-rod of suitable diameter into the heating element of a soldering iron that suits your pupose.

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On 1/20/2019 at 8:35 PM, Gregory said:

For what the OP is discussing; tacking the end of a strip to the hull and following along the length of the strip, I've been using this:

Gregory you have piqued my interest with this - I am going to research that right now. I can foresee a chat with the Admiral/treasurer in the very near future :)

 

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On 1/21/2019 at 1:31 PM, wefalck said:

Even these little irons that are used to apply heat-shrink foils on model-aircraft may be too big. A cheap solution would be to use a temperature-regulated soldering iron (or use a suitable dimmer in the line) and a copper soldering-tip that you can bend/forge into the shape needed. Actually, you can insert any metal-rod of suitable diameter into the heating element of a soldering iron that suits your pupose.

 

Really?  😂

Edited by Gregory

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I use an old pair of hair curling tongs obtained from the Admiral, temperature never gets anywhere near enough to burn the wood.

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