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Mary Taylor by jgodsey - FINISHED - Bluejacket Shipcrafters - Scale 3/16" - Solid Hull Wooden Kit

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The weekend roundup.  It's been another very productive weekend.  Focusing on the deck, all the holes were drilled - masts, fife rails, samson post, smokehead and various eye bolts.  

 

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Some of the black paint from the outer hull bled through the masking tape to the inside of the bulwarks.  So, I spent a bit of time touching up the white paint.  Once that was dry, the cap rails were placed.  

 

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The deck is ready for the furniture.  I read ahead in the book and prepared most of the deck furniture already.  They're patiently waiting placement.

 

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In addition to getting the deck and cap rails completed, I fashioned the bowsprit from the 3/16" square piece.  I used my power drill as a lathe and it worked like a champ.  First, I wrapped one end of the 3/16" square blank with electric tape so it wouldn't get damaged in the drill chuck.  Then slowly using 100 grit sand paper, I spun the square sanding it round.  As it become round, I pull the sandpaper more towards the tip end so it would taper.  Once the tip end was the 1/8" diameter needed, I marked off 3/16" from the end to make the footrope shoulder.  Just this final end was sanded to 3/32".  I gave it an overall smoothing with 400 grit and called it done.  Here's the result.

 

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Then, a coat of black paint to match hull was applied.  This will need to be sanded and painted again to match the evenness of the hull and cap rails.

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And, I played around with the brass blackening chemicals.  Seemed to work OK.  Mostly they came out brown rather than black, but I'm happy with the result.  Here are anchor chain, eye bolts, mast hoops and belaying pins.  I gave them all a light spray of Testor's Dull Kote to further hold the color.

 

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All in all, a very good weekend in the shipyard.

 

Cheers,

Jim

 

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A bit more work on the hull and it's now complete.  

  1. Shaped, coppered and mounted the rudder.  As recommended in the instructions, paper strips painted black were used for the gudgeons and pintles.  Two pins and CA glue were used to adhere the rudder to the hull.
  2. Eye pins for the port and starboard bowsprit shroud eyes were added to the hull and two bobstay eyes inserted on the stem.
  3. After all the glue dried, the hull was removed from the pedestal and given a light coating of Testor's dullcote.  This really toned down the copper shine and smoothed out the paint finish above the waterline.
  4. Finally in preparation for the rigging work to come, all the Britannia blocks and deadeyes were blackened using BlueJacket's Pewter Black solution.  This worked very well.  These are LITTLE.  So, I strung them together on a piece of thread and immersed the entire string of "beads" in the blackening 1 : 10 solution for about 10 minutes.  After they turned dark black, the string was dunked in clean water and dried.  Once dry, the string was tumbled in sawdust to even out the blackening.     527178793_IMG_2015(Edited).thumb.JPG.48ebce3d2ce906a2a06be7847f077e69.JPG1437904777_IMG_2016(Edited).thumb.JPG.37c4c935b5e8beed841227774c0cbed4.JPG518955734_IMG_2017(Edited).thumb.JPG.d9d83c222dbaf8875828ec725d642682.JPGIMG_2020.thumb.JPG.ccfc8a59ad85d6dbfb9cac70f5be5190.JPGIMG_2019.thumb.JPG.6d5b031ce0e75f541f96c4cd82b9858c.JPG

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The deck furniture and fixtures are complete!  The advance preparations really paid off.  The deck came together smoothly and I think it looks pretty good.

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I took a few liberties with the instructions to add some additional details.  Here at the bow, the anchors bills were fitted to chocks.

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Next, rather than lash the twin boats down with eyebolts directly to the deck, fore and aft beams were made and the lashing rope was tied to those.  The rope was dyed tan by sitting in a cup of coffee for an hour, then waxed.

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Here's the scratch built skylight that was shown earlier.  Once glued to the deck, a coat of black paint was given to the inside to give it some depth.

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And, here's the cockpit. I've left the traveler bright, but will probably paint it black when I touch up a few areas.

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Now, it's on to the Masting and Rigging!  Yeah!

 

Thank you again for all the Thumbs Up.  The positive encouragement is truly appreciated.

 

Cheers,

Jim

 

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Posted (edited)

The masts, boom and gaffs are underway.  The main, fore, fore top mast and the main top mast (not pictured) are measured cut, shaped and stained.  The crosstrees were fitted to the main and fore, along with the main boom saddle and a few eyebolts.  That white paint will definitely need to be touched up after everything is mounted.  

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The main and fore masts are in the final stages.  The mast caps were added, as well as the holes drilled for the bails.  The white paint on the top masts was scratched when I test fitted them onto the crosstree and mast cap.  No worries.  That will get a touch up once everything is together.

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Here's the three bails shaped and painted black.  Once the paint dries, they'll be pinned to the mast caps - 2 on the fore and 1 on the main.

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The boom and gaffs are still a work in progress.  Fabricating the jaws is a bit tricky and I'm not sure they're quite ready yet.  They seem a little thick relative to the boom or gaff.  I'm sure with some careful sanding they'll shape up better.

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Slow and steady.

 

Cheers,

Jim

 

 

Edited by jgodsey

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It's been a couple of weeks without a posting, but not without activity.  I needed to wait for parts and tools - Syren boxwood blocks and a Syren Serv-o-Matic.  Of course, then you have to put it together.  Any way that's all done now.

 

The gaffs needed their blocks attached.  I used heavy black thread (50 wt) to strop and tie all the blocks to the eyebolts. 

 

Step 1 - use a little CA to glue the thread to one side of the block.

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Step 2 - pass one end of the thread through the eyebolt and clip the thread together.  Leave a small space between the block and the eyebolt for the seizing knot.

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Step 3 - Use another piece of thread to seize the block to the eyebolt using a clove hitch knot.

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Step 4 - finish stropping the block using a square knot.  The tweezers were helpful in keeping the threads aligned on the sides of the block while tying the knot.

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Step 5 - secure the knots with a white glue wash.  1 part white glue diluted with 8 parts water.  Then, the long thread tails were trimmed.  The entire process takes about 10 - 15 minutes per block.

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Step 6 - Once the glue dries, trim all the thread tails back even with the knot and give the knots another coat of the white glue wash. 

 

And here's both gaffs finished...

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Next, serving all the mast shroud lines.  Fun stuff!

 

Cheers,

Jim

 

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Posted (edited)

While waiting for the white glue wash to dry on the newly served shrouds, I stropped a few more blocks.  This time I used 26 gauge wire that was blackened using Bluejacket Brass Black 52.  That stuff is easy to use and works like a champ on the wire.

 

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Edited by jgodsey

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Working on the standing rigging this week.  So far, the Fore Mast is stepped as well as the Jib Stay, Fore Stay and Spring Stay set.  The thread tails will be cut tight to the knots after the white glue wash dries and I double check the distances one more time.

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CORRECTION:  Bonehead move.  While bragging to the admiral about the progress, I realized that the spring stay will get in the way of placing the main mast shrouds.  The spring stay will need to be cut off and restrung once the main mast is set.  Two steps forward.  One step back.

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If you haven't cut the Spring stay yet, there is an alternative:

 

Seize the middle of the shroud like before, then wrap the shroud line around the lower mast head, and then seize it together in place. A bit awkward, but (I think) easier than cutting a line.

 

Nic

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Nic,

Glad to see you're back at the bench.  Hope you're feeling better.  Good suggestion, but I already took the scissors to it.  Rather than cut the entire Spring Stay, I cut the seizing knots on just the Main Mast side leaving the Fore Mast in tact.  See the picture.  The alligator clip is holding the position.  I'm thinking that will make measuring the shrouds a bit easier since the mast will be at the proper rake.

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Thank you,

Jim

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Thank you to everyone for all the Likes.  

 

The Standing Rigging is now complete.  Rigging shrouds is tricky business as it can be a challenge to keep them even.  I'm sure they get easier with practice.

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And, the masting is complete with both the top masts added.  It's getting real close.

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Now, string the Running Rigging and add the flags.  So close!

 

Cheers,

Jim

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All the running rigging is complete.  It's a little hard to see in this picture, but the jib, foresail, top main and mainsail were simulated using very thin white thread.  All sails to drawn to starboard as port is windward.  Did I get that correct? 

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Now, the various rope coils and hanks need to be added to the line ends.

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Cheers,

Jim

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Thanks Nic.  It should be a few more days for the coils, hanks, flags and base.  

Jim

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I'm enjoying your great work on your Mary Taylor. Almost 40 years ago now, I built Bluejacket's Mary Taylor, then a 1:48 scale version. I'd estimate the kit was around fifteen years old when I got it.  (I'd be interested to know why they went to 3/16" to the foot scale on the new version.) In those days, Bluejacket enjoyed a great reputation, but all kits were far more "primitive" then than they are today. There was a solid hull machine-carved to shape, quite accurately, in fact. There were the plans, some blocks of wood for the boats, some strips of wood and dowels, and a few cast parts, including the blocks and deadeyes. That was it.  Today, many would consider it close to a scratch-build, but for the hull. I have to admit to taking some "poetic license" with her in my less-sophisticated earlier days of modeling, but enjoy her still to this day. 

 

I'm happy to report that this model has never exhibited any signs of "lead bloom" on the metal fittings. High lead content fittings were common back then, but perhaps Bluejacket was a pioneer in going to Britannia metal. I don't know, but I'm happy they didn't crumble to dust over the years.

 

It's interesting to compare the two versions. Notably, I see where the later version has a skylight aft of the mainmast, a binnacle, and iron-stocked anchors. (The sails were my own "scratch" addition...  and out of scale in some details.) No doubt the current version benefited from additional research over the years.  The below (old and poor quality) photos of my Mary Taylor build are below. Don't rely on them as any authority for historical accuracy, but I thought you might enjoy seeing what the earlier version looked like.

 

Thanks for sharing your build log with us!

 

 

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Bob,

 

Thank you so much for the kind words.  This was only my 2nd build and it provided a great platform for learning.  Your Mary Taylor looks pretty awesome as well.  Scale or not, the sails look great!

 

I'm pretty close to being done.  At this point, the boat build is complete now that the flags are flying.  I'm finishing up the display mounting board and will post the "finished" pictures once it's formally mounted.

 

Thank you again!

Jim

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Well, that glorious day has arrived.  The Mary Taylor is now finished!  This has been a fun build and I learned a lot.  As I'm sure is true with all builds, some days were a bit more fun than others.  I certainly had a few self-inflicted challenges along the way.  But, it's finished now and I'm proud of the results.  The Admiral is very impressed.  

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Thank you to everyone for their likes and kind words.  For someone new to ship modeling, they truly mean a lot.

 

Build #3 is in the closet waiting for my birthday in a few weeks.  A new build log will follow.

 

Cheers!

Jim

 

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Jim, 

Impressive ship, really looks great!

I see the Mary Taylor sneaking into my stash of models.

I've never tried a Bluejacket kit, but, the results do speak for themselves. 

 

Looking forward to your next project. 

 

Tom E 

 

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Thanks Nic!  Your Mary Taylor build log was a constantly source helpful knowledge and additional perspective.  I'm grateful it was there.

Hope your recovery is going well.

Jim 

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Hello from the UK Jim ,

I am also looking forward to my second build once I finish my AL Marie-Jeanne French tuna fishing boat . I have,nt quite made my mind up between a few different models but really like the idea of a schooner build the same or similar to the "Mary Taylor" (great build tutorial by the way ) .

Was just wondering , on a solid build hull , is there much wood to trim or shave off before you get to the exact shape , I think what I,m trying to say is , is it hard difficult work ?

Thanks

Mike

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Sea Hoss - Thank you for the kind compliment.

 

UK Mike - the solid hull has a knob of wood on the bow that needs to be trimmed down.  Overall, the whole hull is just a bit too thick all around.  The templates provide very good guidance on how much to shape down the excess.  Take time to make copies of the plan, then make the templates from the copies.  The wood is reasonable soft and it was pretty easy to trim.  I used a combination of a hobby knife #11 blade, #17 chisel blade, 100 grit sand paper and most helpful, a Dremel with a sanding drum attachment.  Be careful though.  Because the wood is pretty soft, you can easily take off too much especially if your using power tools.

 

At the end of the day for me, solid hull vs. POB or POF is a matter of personal preference.  I've seen many excellent builds on this forum of both solid and planked hulls.  My next build is a POB.  I want to give that a serious try.  I have the Corel Dragone kit sitting on the shelf waiting to start as soon as time allows.  A build log will certainly follow.

 

Good luck in your next build choice.  I really don't think there's a right or wrong answer.  Go with what looks cool to you and have fun.

 

Cheers,

Jim

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I just read through your build log Jim, and you should be very proud of the way she turned out.  Bluejacket produces fine kits, but it still takes dedication, pride and skill to produce a model as fine as you have done.  Your second build? - exceptional.  Now dig #3 out of the closet.    

 

Gary

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