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New ( I think.. ) Dremel


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I came across this the other day while strolling through Walmart..

2050-15 Stylo-Plus

I'm posting the Amazon link due to extra pictures.

I couldn't resist.

 

NewDremel.jpg.78480c97ff3e4a78a66fc29c0fcf9ecc.jpg

 

It comes with the standard colette that fits most other Dremels.  I added the Dremel keyless chuck.

 

It is very light, and doesn't feel much bigger than a large pen when held.

It doesn't seem as big as the illustrations at Amazon indicate.  ( A model with small hands maybe? )

It has a small  18v  power supply with a very lightweight cord.

 

Edited by Gregory
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That's getting close to micromotor size, that's nice. Now if they could just make them brushless and use rare earth magnets for the torque... I seriously thought 12 years ago when I bought my micromotor that the technology would get less expensive and filter down to Dremel within a decade. Instead, micromotors have gotten relatively much more expensive for reasons I don't understand. The setup I have literally costs twice as much now as it did 12 years ago in a period of never more than 3% inflation.

 

Guess we have to hope the Chinese will make some reasonable-quality micromotors or Dremel figures out how to make one at reasonable cost. In the meantime, this 2050 looks like a good choice if it has enough torque for carving away at wood.

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I know several German colleagues, who have this micro-motor from China for which you don't have to ask a ten-year advance on your pocket-money: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Pro-Dental-Equipment-MARATHON-N3-Micro-Motor-35Krpm-Handpiece-Polishing-Machine/302849066764?epid=1665442752&hash=item468336070c:m:mADTGf5-18Ti5Vu-ku3mGjA:rk:8:pf:0.

They seem to be very pleased with it. They may not last as long as the professional units, but then we are probably not using it that extensively.

There seem to be brushed and brushless varieties on the market.

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I use resharpened carbide bits with a 1/8" shank for all my fine drilling.  https://drillcity.stores.yahoo.net/restool.html  The Foredom has an optional 1/8" collet so that would work out for me.  Thanks for bringing to my attention.  I still have to figure out an excuse to buy another expensive tool.

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The resharpened bits in the link look interesting, as they seem to be shorter (of course) than new bits and, hence, less prone to break.

 

On the other hand, used drill bits from the electronics etc. industry that have been exchanged due to pre-emptive maintenance before they become really dull seem to be a lot cheaper. So breaking one costs less than breaking a resharpened one.

 

Somehow, I feel quieter with HSS-drills than with carbide ones below 0.5 mm when using them in hand-held devices. Unfortunaly, these have either nominal drill-size, 1.5 mm, or 1.0 mm shafts.

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  • 4 weeks later...

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