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NicholasJ

New here. Possibly in over my head.

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Hello everyone

 

I recently purchased a model ship. The ‘Le Hussard’.

 

I’ve always loved these models and tall ships in general. So i made this purchase of this second hand model as the previous owner gave up due to lack of time. I thought this would be like a complicated LEGO model with step by step instructions. 

However it seems I was wrong. There is so much more to it. Skills to learn and terminology I don’t know. I read through the forums here about all the new people that give up. I hope that won’t be me. 

 

So where should I start? What tools do i need? Which glue should I use?

 

Im not sure where to start here. 

 

Thanks for any help,

 

Nick

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Edited by NicholasJ

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Don't panic: it is like a lego box, but a slightly more complicated one :)

 

Buying second hand is a bit of a risk: the box already being opened can result in either missing, or damaged parts.

Buying a kit that is already started, is also a risk: you start out with the problems an other person made.

 

Having siad that:

step 1: check the contents of the box (check it against the instruction booklet, which I hope is there, otherwise you have a BIG chalenge)

 

step 2: read the instruction booklet (not hust the first step, but all of it, at least twice). You can also do this as step 0

 

Step 3: try to imagine where everything has to go (more or less)

 

step 4 buy you some basic tools and materials.

a small hammer, couple of pins (you know the long shapr ones, the missus uses when creating a new dress). Clothing peggs can be usefull as well as clamps. Buy something like a couple of sharp knives (the X-acto will do, don't forget the spare blades, as you will snap and damage a couple when going along).

 

for glue: white wood glue, gives you plenty of grip, and plenty of correction time.

 

Some modellersfiles (not the heavy metal workers version), and sandpaper (course and fine).

 

Accept the fact that you will come to the point that your tools don't suffice, and buy when needed. No need to set up a full scale modellers workshop before starting your first.

 

Don't set your standards too high. I don't know what you paid for this kit, but be prepared to think "ah well, it was only just for fun, and I had some fun trying". The 'next will be better thought' will never leave you, however high quality you will ever reach :)

 

 

With respect to the model itself: it looks as if the frames are already glued to the keel. If so, make sure that the keel is straight, and than the frames are perpendicular to the keel. 

 

And then you are off, onto a whole new road: read the booklet, and sees what comes next. 

Remeber: it is very tempting to do things not in the order the booklet shows, but they are there (probably) for a reason. In all cases: don't forget to think ahead. What comes next, and how am I going to do it.

 

In case of doubt or emergency: stop working, and give us a shout and a picture. :)

 

Jan

 

 

 

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Howdy!

 

   You have gotten some good advice and I can only add a few things. There are a couple of build logs that I could find for Le Hussard that might help you a bit:

 

 

And:

 

 And just remember that this site has many masterpieces and spectacular models that can make any other kind of effort look shabby in comparison but this is not really the point. Your kit is an introduction to the craft and hobby and you can learn many interesting things along the way of building it. If you are lucky, there will be many more models to come each one of which will be a bit "better" than the last. Good luck and enjoy the ride!

 

  Kevin

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Hello Nick, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'.

 

You've already got some very good advice, but I'd add that you might like to start your own build log.  That way we can enjoy your progress and you have a platform for asking questions and advice as you go.

 

John

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Nick:

Welcome. I agree with everything that has been said here. 

 

Everyone here began where you are at some point. Even now, the most talented modelers always learn something new each time they make something. It never stops. 

 

I have been scratch building for a little more than 20 years. The tools I use the most are hand tools. Clothes pins for clamping are the easiest to get and will serve many uses. You can buy other clamps as you need them. The number 11 exacto blade with a knife handle will do for a lot of cutting. I recommend wood glue like Titebond for wood to wood joints. Clamp whenever you can as it creates a better joint. super glue (cyanoacrylate or CA) will do for metal to wood joints, although many prefer epoxy. Get a good ruler marked down to 1/32 inch and keep a SHARP pencil for marking. Keep it sharp.  Always take care with your tools. Respect their ability to hurt you and you can avoid a nasty cut. I speak from experience. 

 

Definitely start a build log. Ask lot's of questions, but ask them beforehand and the answers will be of greater benefit. :) 

 

Above all, have fun. That is what this is all about. Ship modeling is my stress relief. Do not let it create stress. Enjoy it and do not be afraid to walk away for a day or so if you run into a challenge that requires some thought. Go slow, read your instructions and plans, ask questions, measure twice and cut once etc. :)

 

Russ

 

 

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If all you want is a ship model, you'll probably find it difficult not to burn out on trying to build one. If you enjoy working with your hands and solving mechanical challenges, you're in the right place. It's all about the process and the crafts involved. I can't imagine there's a challenge you'll encounter that hasn't been met before and solved by somebody in here who explained how they did it. You'll learn all you need to know reading the past posts in this forum. It's probably the best collection of basic information on ship modeling anyone could ever hope to find. There are some real "Rembrandts" sharing their work in here. Few artists will ever be a Rembrandt, but we all can't help being better artists when we get to look over Rembrandt's shoulder.

Edited by Bob Cleek

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Gidday Nick and another warm welcome from a neighbour Downunder.

 I can only reinforce what others have said.

Check and re-check the kit contents against the parts list.

Don't get hung up on terminology as there is plenty of information and support on this site.

A clean clutter free, I say that with tongue firmly planted in cheek, well lit workspace.

Regarding glue, I use Selleys Aquadhere PVA woodworking glue

Because of some health issues I also use solvent free glues, less than 5% solvent, available at Bunnings Hardware.

A set of files.

Exacto knife and blades and more blades are pretty much the go to cutting implement. 

Exacto saw blades also come in handy.

A small hammer and tweezers.

Clamps and more clamps and more clamps.

I use a magnifying lamp that clamps onto my workbench.

I also use a small vise that clamps onto my workbench.

Don't forget to ask questions when you get stuck.

Wishing you all the best with your build.

Mark.

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Welcome. In addition I would add micro drill bits, a Dremel, a magnifying light and a big old box of patience There are lots of tools that come in handy as we progress in this hobby the biggest thing is enjoy yourself.

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Thanks so much for all the great responses and the warm welcome. People really went out of their way to help me and it’s very much appreciated. I feel I should reply to each individual but I’m in a rush right now. So sorry.

 

I’m feeling a lot better about completing this now due to all the advice. 

 

I also just realised there is a step by step on the box! I was searching through all the paper work. I was feeling a bit lost without knowing what order to do things. It also states on the box: building a scale model is very easy. Just follow the photographs step by step. ;)

 

next step will be do order some tools 

👍

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Welcome to MSW Nick,

Le Hussard was my third build. It is a very nice model and I think a good one for your first attempt at constructing one. It is double planked which makes it easier to rectify mistakes in the first layer of planking,before adding the outer finishing planking of the hull. The instructions certainly look more comprehensive and easier to follow than the older version. Go slowly and walk away for a bit if it gets frustrating.  Any problems or questions will be gladly answered and helped to resolve by the forum members. One thing I try to keep in mind that this is a hobby and not a job. Work at a pace you feel comfortable with. I don't want to admit how long I have been working on my present build!

John

 

 

Edited by JohnB40
wrong name entered

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19 hours ago, JohnB40 said:

Welcome to MSW Kevin.

Le Hussard was my third build. It is a very nice model and I think a good one for your first attempt at constructing one. It is double planked which makes it easier to rectify mistakes in the first layer of planking,before adding the outer finishing planking of the hull. The instructions certainly look more comprehensive and easier to follow than the older version. Go slowly and walk away for a bit if it gets frustrating.  Any problems or questions will be gladly answered and helped to resolve by the forum members. One thing I try to keep in mind that this is a hobby and not a job. Work at a pace you feel comfortable with. I don't want to admit how long I have been working on my present build!

John

 

 

Thanks Kevin. I’m sure I’ll have many questions for you.

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Hello there. You are not a;lone. Maybe you can try Lauck Street Shipyard for how-to information you can adapt to your build. May not be the same ship but the skills and tools are similar.

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I would add a small Zona hand saw to the list Amateur provided. Also fingernail files in various grits are cheap and reasonably effective replacements for lots of files.

 

Planking is obviously something doable from all the models you see here, but it's not easy the first time. Look in the forums for the section on planking and framing models and read up there and look for the planking tutorial videos you can find there.

 

Don't cheat and go quick on the first planking layer, go slowly and try to plank it exactly as you would do the second layer. That way the first layer acts as a practice run for the second planking layer, which will go much better as a result.

 

You need patience for ship modeling. Planking can take a while, as will rigging- you just have to plug ahead and keep making progress.

 

Spend lots of time reading other build logs. You will learn immense amounts from doing so.

 

Look in the gallery of completed models here for Le Hussard, people usually upload quite a few pics that show the finished ship from many directions and that can very much help figure out what you need to do and what certain parts are and what they should look like when finished.

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