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HM Cutter Cheerful 1806 by bartley - 1/48 scale


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Posted (edited)

Post 60: Rigging the Shrouds

 

Though I have done this on my previous build, I cheated and used three horizontal seizings.  This time I decided to do it the " proper" way with a throat seizing as described in Chuck's monograph.  I had some discussions with him about the details of this since the  book by Lees and others suggest that the shroud should run anticlockwise around the deadeye but in Chuck's diagram they are clockwise. His point was that neatness was the main point and that for a right handed person it was easier to tie the throat seizing on the right hand side and so I elected to do it that way.  Incidentally, there is a detailed discussion of all this by Ed Tosti here.  I also used Ed's method of keeping the deadeyes level:

 

_MG_5512S.jpg.13ce650a463716020f04f807f5b86ce3.jpg_MG_5523S.jpg.3da38b65f5ba2bdc8bd069c1e81e941c.jpg

 

 

 

I think this is actually overkill for only four deadeyes!! 

 

Chuck does it freehand and, it retrospect that would be just as good.  In my view jigs only work if you can keep the tensions on each shroud equal.  I found this easy enough for three of the stays but difficult for the fully served stay at the forward end.  Anyway here is the final result,

_MG_5538Mod.thumb.jpg.1de8ffd6e6a38fe277b81f4ce3bd5c86.jpg

 

 

John

 

 

 

 

Edited by bartley
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Posted (edited)

By the way, I sailed for a day on the square rigger in the foreground down in Cornwall some years ago.  There was no way that their deadeyes were in line.  They thought it was a strange thing to expect.  Apparently the shrouds stretch differently and it is more important to tension the rig to account for this than keep the deadeyes level.

 

SqRig.jpg.d112706929b3fa2b701808954c22fbdf.jpg

 

John

Edited by bartley
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Posted (edited)

Post 61: Faking Down

 

Before the ratlines get in the way I decided to at least attach some rope coils.  I use the method of Tom Lauria.  I find that that his oval jig produces coils that are a little too symmetrical for my taste so I slightly modify the shape of the jig to make it a little more pointed at one end.  After painting with diluted acrylic medium the coils are allowed to dry and then cut from the jig.

 

 _MG_5584.jpg.a39dc48a00134ad2473294f42c5ead80.jpg  _MG_5585.jpg.5c93404721bcb021e043a50ba77be32f.jpg

 

and here are some attached to belaying pins

 

_MG_5577.jpg.8686269cd769e386fbac33a846b2b67b.jpg

 

_MG_5575.jpg.16ffb989b91354e6981328a1c81de93e.jpg

 

 

I am not entirely happy with how the look, but the more I make the better I get.  The only trouble is they use up more rope than you would think and  my light brown rope is fast running out!

 

John

 

Edited by bartley
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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, Sea Hoss said:

Your coils look nice, I may use that method, thanks for the demo.

Thanks for your comment, Sea Hoss.  First let me acknowledge Tom Lauria who originated this method. Tom uses an ellipse from a template such as this.

 

_MG_5588.jpg.8fa19c3e1d92d8185217b8a5b0147486.jpg

 

As I said I prefer a less symmetrical appearance so first I draw up a rough sketch of the size and shape I want to achieve:

 

 _MG_5586.jpg.8db7cf822d85b245cc91795a06234da1.jpg

 

I would make two or three of these of slightly different shape since on a working ship these coils are neat but not identical.

 

 

Then i drill holes and insert pins as Tom does and continue with his method.

 

John

Edited by bartley
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Posted (edited)

Post 62: Ratting Down

 

For some this is a tedious job but there are only a few to do on this ship.  The first issue is that there is some kind of perspective distortion on the plans which results in the spacing of the ratlines decreasing towards the top.  I spoke to Chuck about this and he agrees that the spacing should be the same all the way to the top.  It is a ladder after all.  Therefore I drew my own grid in Illustrator with a spacing of 12inches which corresponds to 6.32 mm at this scale.   In order to avoid the "hourglass" effect I did two things.  First I camped the shroud to the card grid neat where I was tying.

 

_MG_5599.jpg.f1fea804a44d1ec59d2b58ed8e9b7945.jpg

 

I discovered this technique somewhere on this site but I can't remember where to give proper credit for the idea.

 

The second thing I did was to first tie at an interval of twelve then  six then three.

 

As we know on the real ship eye slices were used on the outer shrouds.  Ed Tosti's book on Young America illustrates this well but it is difficult to do at this scale.  The essence of this technique is that the line on the outer shrouds travels inward towards the middle shrouds.  I simulate this by using a cow hitch on the outer shrouds and clove hitches on the inner ones.  The problem with a cow hitch   Both exit stands need to be held  under tension.  If only one is under tension the knot slips.  Indeed this is the purpose of the knot as I well know from using it as a leg rope on cows art milking time.  I digress.  So, on can make it more stable either by following it wit a half hitch or by passing the free end back through the coils, This is what I have done here.

 

_MG_56032.jpg.7af287b73dec47e5bdbdf24a4e076891.jpg

 

 

 

The port side is nearly complete.  Only the starbord to go

 

John

 

Edited by bartley
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/23/2021 at 8:05 PM, bartley said:

some kind of perspective distortion on the plans

Interesting, but not a problem with my plans. The top rung and bottom rung and all in between of my completed rat lines using the plans as a guide are the same distance, 6mm, apart. Not sure what might happened to your copy.  

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2 hours ago, glbarlow said:

Interesting, but not a problem with my plans. The top rung and bottom rung and all in between of my completed rat lines using the plans as a guide are the same distance, 6mm, apart. Not sure what might happened to your copy.  

Yes, Glenn,  I had a conversation with Chuck about this and in the end it turned out to be to do with my scan of the plans.  I don't know why.  It has never happened before or since!  Anyway my grid turned out to be exactly the same as the plans anyway so I went with that. 

 

By the way your rope coil method is very elegant.  Interestingly enough I had that method of Peta_V in my files but had forgotten about it.  The idea of using two pegs of different sizes is a good one . This is how I modified Tom Laura's. method in the end rather than use pins as he does but I still had to use two pins at the top to get the loop to work.

 

John

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Seizing revisited

 

My Cheerful has been on hold for a while since we have just taken our annual holiday.  My other hobbies have also interfered with my shipbuilding. 

 

In the past I have used various threads (16/0 fly tying line, 50 wt sewing thread, etc). 

 

_MG_5594.jpg.5b2dbce99f46e82ac7d9f400967eecb6.jpg

 

However, since I am now making my own rope it suddenly dawned on me that it makes more sense to use the Mara thread I use. It obviously matches perfectly and comes in a variety of sizes. 

 

For example:

 

Mara 220 has a diameter of 0.109 mm

Mara 150 has a diameter of 0.135 mm

Mara 120 has a diameter of 0.14 mm

Mara 100 has a diameter of 0.17 mm

Mara  70 has a diameter of 0.19 mm

Mara  30 has a diameter of 0.30 mm

For comparison:

Gutermann C Ne 50 Cotton has a diameter of 0.128 mm

 

_MG_5632.jpg.61c2662bc19bb1cf93a570c00fa3bb4b.jpg

 

Here is an example of its use in seizing:

 

_MG_5619.jpg.ea65be22273adc6ac28cd96494370bbb.jpg _MG_5616-5.jpg.beb3bd7ef3af997563727f863f7db07e.jpg

 

16/0 fltying line is still thinner.  The diameter is hard to measure accurately.  The old technique of wrapping 10 or 20 turns around a dowel is difficult with any thing less than about 0.3 mm in diameter.  It  is quoted in one source at around 0.05 mm.  although my calculations based on the Denier given by the manufacturer produces a value of 0.105.  Even so for small rope I might keep using it. 

 

John

 

 

 

Edited by bartley
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