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Advise on first ship kit


James78
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Hi guys. I'm looking for some advice on my first ship kit to buy. I've some model building experience. I've built the conestoga wagon from model expo and I'm almost finished the wright flyer. The wright flyer was extremely hard but I'm almost done! I'd love to get into ship kits now. I know I've to start somewhere but I don't want something too easy. The wright flyer was a really tough build with tiny delicate pieces and not great instructions. I think I'd be able to tackle a ship build once it has good clear instructions and plans. I tried one years ago but the instructions were absolutely terrible with very little pictures. Any suggestions appreciated. 

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My first real model ship kit was the Sultana by Model Shipways (Model Expo).  

 

It was a good challenge and I learned a lot in the process.

 

It’s easy enough for the first time builder but is easily modified if you want to expand your skills.

 

I was happy with the end result.

C3F7C7FD-203E-4B40-9A82-9AA5B33ECC92.jpeg

Edited by GrandpaPhil
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Given your previous modeling experience, I would urge you to build on that. You'll be fine. Your steepest learning curve will be in dealing with the nautical terminology and learning how wooden vessels are built. I'd strongly encourage you to start with one of Chuck Passaro's longboat models marketed by Model Shipways. You can follow his build log and group build posts in this forum and see what building one entails, as well has have access to advice from others building the model and its designer himself. Chuck's instructions are excellent and his kits are "finestkind." You won't have to worry about missing parts, junk wood, and indecipherable instructions. When you are done, you'll have mastered hanging real plank on real frames and mastered the basics of anything you'll later encounter building ship models and you'll have a very interesting, high quality, work of art of which you can be proud.  Once you've got a longboat under your belt, you can move on to his larger and much more complex Syren. Avoid the temptation offered by many kit manufacturers to undertake a hugely complex and challenging model, and too often a low quality kit, right out of the gate.  

 

See: https://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/forum/76-medway-longboat-1742-plank-on-frame-group-project/

 

You can download PDFs of Chuck's instructions here:

 

Edited by Bob Cleek
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Thanks alot Bob. Ed in model expo advised me to start with the longboat. I think I'm getting sidetracked by bigger boats but you're right, I need to start small and build on it. I'm going to take your advice and get the longboat. At least I'll have plenty of support here which is great. Are the armed longboat and longboat much the same by model ship ways do you know. I see 2 of similar boats on their site. Thanks again. 

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Hey James, welcome. Number 1 thing I advise is build something you are interested in. No matter what your level of experience etc. we all run into problems at some point. By having a genuine interest in the subject of the build you will be far more likely to overcome the problems and complete the build. My very first wooden model ship was the Amati Santa Maria. Scale 1:50 (from memory), and recommended for intermediate modellers. The instructions were total garbage, as many European kits are, but because I was/am a Columbus fanatic I ploughed on through the problem area's and ended up with a very fine double plank on bulkhead model that I am very proud to say I built. So I reckon being invested in the subject of your build should constitute an extremely large percentage of the decision making process as to which kit to tackle first. And don't forget, no matter what problems you run into, you can bet your house that someone else here has experienced the exact same problem previously and can help you out with answers.

 

Cheers

 

Chris

 

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First post.  A complete. novice on wooden ships. Not contradicting anybody’s advice. I can’t. LOL.

Being in the same boat as you, I’ve wish I would have started on a larger scale.

I’m working on a 1/187 scale. Parts are frustratingly tiny.

There’s a lifetime of things to learn without dealing with the size of poor quality parts.

Try filing an abundance of flash off a cleat that’s less than 1/4 inch.

Yes, very relaxing.

It was fairly expensive, but the quality is poor.

I started it because it was a molded plastic hull.

It just seems to make things more difficult than if the parts were larger.

But, you may enjoy the challenge.

 

I’m really looking forward to the next victim. 

Model Shipways pinky. Glad Tidings.

It gigantic compared to the current project.

And the difference in quality is amazing.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, ricky86 said:

I’m really looking forward to the next victim. 

Model Shipways pinky. Glad Tidings.

It gigantic compared to the current project.

And the difference in quality is amazing.

 

You might consider setting the small scale build you've been working on aside and building Glad Tidings first. You'll probably enjoy Glad Tidings a lot more at this stage of the game. After that, you'll have more experience and confidence and can go back to finishing the "big boat." There's no rule that "you have to eat your peas before you can have desert!"

 

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9 hours ago, James78 said:

Are the armed longboat and longboat much the same by model ship ways do you know. I see 2 of similar boats on their site. Thanks again. 

They are very similar vessels, but, as I understand it, two different British Admiralty longboats.  Each is an exact replica of two different contemporary longboat models in the British National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. The Model Shipways "Armed Longboat" is a 1:24 scale kit and the finished model is 24" long. It carries a cannon at the bow. This kit was, I believe, designed by Chuck Passaro for Model Shipways.

 

The "Medway Longboat (1742)" does not have a cannon, but is equipped with a anchor windlass and sailing rig. It is also 1:24 scale (1/2" = 1') and is probably about the same size as the "Armed Longboat." The Medway longboat is sold by Chuck's own company, Syren Ship Models. See: https://www.syrenshipmodelcompany.com/medway-longboat-1742.php  You buy it directly from Chuck. He has a rebate/discount price deal if you sign up to participate in the group build of it on this forum.

 

(See:

 

I am sure that if you send Chuck a PM, he can answer your questions with more detail and perhaps help you choose between the two. I've not built either of them (as yet,) and Chuck could certainly let you know which was the better fit for your needs. I believe that with the deal on the Medway Longboat through the forum, the prices are roughly equivalent. 

Edited by Bob Cleek
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Cheers everyone for your replies. Great to know I'll have support here. Like I said before, I tried a ship from constructo but the instructions were terrible and barely any photos. I'm very egar to start up again once I completed the wright flyer. I know myself I could manage a build once I've the tools to do it as in well detailed instructions. Thanks again. 

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