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mfrazier

Golden Hind by mfrazier - OcCre - scale 1:85

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I have a question. I am wondering if the scale of the ship I am building (1:85) would it be noticeable to take the time to serve the various rigging lines. Some of these lines are very small. I would like some feedback on this from you more experienced fellows. I have never served any lines before and would like to know when or if the line is too small to make it practical. I never heard of serving before I got this model to build and this kit doesn't even mention these details. This rigging is new to me and I am trying to study up on it some while waiting for my parts to arrive. Any tips would be appreciated.

 

Mark F.

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I would do the serving, but I'm fairly high on the stickler for details scale. Look at it this way, chances are you'll end up working in 1/64 or 1/48 and they will seem easy after doing it correctly in 1/85.

 

That said, taking an easier route through your first model isn't a horrible idea; you learn so much during the building that it probably won't end up at the front of your display cabinet. Just getting a feel for rigging and masting and hull construction in your first effort and then buckling down on the accuracy and difficulty in the next might be the best way.

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Hi Mark!  You're doing great for a first effort. Obviously, you are a skilled "maker," and it's just the subject matter that's new to you.

 

Vossie has given you good advice. I'll just clarify what appears to be a misconception about serving. It's only the "standing" rigging that is served, i.e. the "ropes" that don't move, mainly the "shrouds" which run from the masts to the sides of the ship and the "stays" which run parallel to the centerline of the ship. The "running" rigging, which moves to control the sails and spars and such isn't served. We'd all be in the looney bin by now if all the line on a model had to be served! :D  If you have a lathe in your shop, you won't need a "serving machine" because you've already got one. Just run the line through the headstock, securing it at the head in a chuck or however you wish and at the tailstock with a swivel so that when the lathe is run (slowly) the whole line turns rather than twisting. The excess line can be secured at the outer end of the headstock so it turns with the working part of the line and doesn't twist up and kink. One of those swivels they sell for fishing rigs to keep lures from kinking the line when they spin works well for a "live" end on the tailstock.) You can then tie a thread onto the taut portion of line between the headstock and tailstock and, holding the spool of thread in your hand, serve the shroud or stay easily and quickly. It takes a bit of practice, but it's easy to get the hang of it.

 

I also strongly suggest you get a copy of Frank Mastini's book Ship Modeling Simplified: Tips and Techniques for Model Construction from Kits. It's in print in paperback and runs about $16.  Amazon and Barnes and Noble have it, of course, and somebody is selling them on eBay with free shipping for only $8 right now.

 

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

Mastini's book is a general introduction to kit building for folks starting out and, for that purpose, it's excellent. If you get involved in the hobby, you'll quickly find yourself amassing a library of reprints of Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century treatises on naval architecture, ship rigging and naval ordinance, but that will come in due course. Mastini's book addresses the somewhat standard practices of the kit manufacturers and answers a lot of questions raised by the manufacturers' often too brief instructions. If memory serves, it also contains a translation glossary of nautical terms in French, Spanish and Italian, so one can figure out what the foreign language instructions are talking about. I'd consider it a must for a first time kit builder. It will save you a lot of grief and frustration.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks guys. I think I will serve lines on this model (especially for practice). You are correct that the building is not a problem for me, it is learning the terminology and what standard practices should be. I have a degree in engineering and have been a master machinist and tool and die maker most of my life and wood working has also been a hobby for about 30 years. I got this kit as a sort of test run because my next project will be a larger model built from scratch. ( I am used to building things from scratch and drawing and reading blue prints). I always liked ships and this is on my bucket list. I am hoping my health and mobility lasts as many more years as it will take to build the ship of my dreams. I am a little slower than I used to be. I have had a couple heart attacks, open heart surgery, a couple of strokes (after which I now have trouble with numbers), tremors on my left side, and severe spinal stenosis which messes up my balance and ability to walk. 

      I downloaded and printed several articles found about planking hulls and decking. I also found and downloaded a very large list of terminology and their explanations to refer to. The next ship I build , I want at a scale where the hull will be in the range of about 2 feet long. This will allow a much higher detail level. I don't know how long it will take to build, but I hope my health and life lasts as long as I need. 

    I am ordering a few of the books you have recommended. I spent my life learning everything I can about anything I can and this is a new adventure and world of knowledge.

 

 

 

Edited by mfrazier
Spell5

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940340160_20190305_2049332.thumb.jpg.bd3b14fa42a308fe7150d7071152f731.jpg

While waiting for the wood I ordered to arrive, I raided the junk ( I mean inventory) box in my shop and started to put together a serving machine. The gears are 2" diameter RC car gears I machined aluminum hubs for to mount on the shafts. After trial fitting everything, it turns smoothly. I put nylon bushings for bearings in the oak wood frame so I can motorize it later. I still have to make a crank for each end. This little machine will cost me "zero" dollars since I had everything lying around already. I'll post a finished photo as soon as it is done.

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Mark

Very nice build, I never thought about ships but that is a wonderful hobby.

Your ship is looking very nice, love your alterations. 

Don't think about time or health you are going to be fine.

Nelson

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I got the wood I needed and finished the mezzanine on the rear and started adding the railings.

2106312121_20190312_2102252.thumb.jpg.9a2741416aebb6a6ab77bf77a8dd23ee.jpg

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I put a matte finish on the decks. 

85800171_20190312_2102572.thumb.jpg.bd6cbcbdfdb16623a1831e3e716bee0e.jpg

I won't have a lot of time for the next few weeks, but try to spend a couple of hours each evening working on it to unwind.

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Looks good Mark, and that's the right way to do it- even if you don't have lots of time to work on it, even spending 15 minutes moving something along will help. You still have a reasonable distance to go with the fitting out of the hull and all the rigging.

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