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KORTES

La Jacinthe by Kortes - FINISHED - 1:42 scale - French schooner

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Dear Colleagues, please let me present my first model made from the ground-up – the model of French military schooner «La Jacinthe». From the drafts of the monography  Jean Doudriot. I used pear tree and painted hornbeam. Scale 1:42 Technical characteristics of the model: length 895 mm, width 285 mm, height 670 mm.

In the process of building I have used as example the works of Dmitriy Shevelev and Slavyan Snarlev. 

I finished my work on the 23 of September 2016. I had a photo report of the work, I decided to post it, maybe it could useful to someone.

My best regards, Alexander.

 

 

 

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After taking measuring, I had to fix the outlines in certain places, glue some extra laths, and then finished up with rat-file. In this case asp was a good choice – the wood is not too siftproof and can be nicely processed with sandpaper.  

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Just beautiful work!  I have the plans but never seem to get up the nerve to attempt it so I am anxious to follow.  Is the build by Dmitriy Shevelev on a Russian forum?

 

Greg

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13 hours ago, Reg said:

  Is the build by Dmitriy Shevelev on a Russian forum?

 

 

Yes it is.

Im very touched by your attention to my work.

Edited by KORTES

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Yes, you're right, the bunny was my partner in the building process. So I can say I was working under his supervision.

Concerning the caulking - I was using the plastic tape. I posted the process in the theme Friech Boeir Yacht SPERWER by Kortes - 1:30 scale on the page 

 

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As I had to work under a constant supervision, I forgot to post  photos at the time.

Although the process of lath bending has been highlighted many times, I would still like to share my experience. I think it could come in handy in the process of covering of the overhang and taffrail. I tried different modes, but decided to use the one that consists in bending the steam-treated plank on the pattern. This complicates the process a bit, making it more time-consuming, but when setting in place, the further  work is much more comfortable. The lath I used is no less than 1,5mm thick, if it’s thick it can be refined using marking gage.

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Edited by KORTES

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Now, some of mistakes…

In order to warn my colleagues, who , just like me , don’t have too much experience, I wanted to highlight my mistake in the process of covering.

More than once in the working process I made sure that THE BEST IS THE ENEMY OF THE GOOD. After having completed the covering I  decided , following the example of the Masters, to highlight the joints between the laths a bit. As a result, I haven’t succeeded in it, but I ruined the covering. The reason turned out to be banal – the glue on the plank ends, which wasn’t erased in time.

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    While this method obviously works well for you, I am wondering why you don't just make the frames, fill the spaces solid with blocking, shape the hull and proceed directly to the finish planking rather than adding two additional layers of sub planking onto your solid blocked and shaped hull?  It seems like a lot of additional work to accomplish the same result.  Or is there a method to your madness?;)  Because as I can say there is no denying the quality of your results.

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19 hours ago, druxey said:

Well done for doing the planking over again! It's a hard decision, but one I'm sure you are glad of now.

Dear druxey,

Yes, you are right, making this decision wasn't easy, but I had an example of the outstanding Masters in front of me  and I really wanted to get even if for a little closer to their quality of work. In the end I was satisfied with the results, even though I had to redo my work many times. Plus I have gotten experience out of it.

 

19 hours ago, BETAQDAVE said:

    While this method obviously works well for you, I am wondering why you don't just make the frames, fill the spaces solid with blocking, shape the hull and proceed directly to the finish planking rather than adding two additional layers of sub planking onto your solid blocked and shaped hull?  It seems like a lot of additional work to accomplish the same result.  Or is there a method to your madness?;)  Because as I can say there is no denying the quality of your results.

 

Dear BETAQDAVE,

It's hard to give a definite answer on the choice of the method of making a hull. I found this method used by Snarlev, and at that moment I thought it was the easiest and the least labor consuming.When working on "Sperwer" I used a different method, and I could say that each one has its own advantages.

 

18 hours ago, KeithAug said:

Kortes

 

New planking looks good - how did you remove the old planking?

 

 

Dear KeithAug,

The covering was removed by means of heating by a hot air gun, it wasn't hard due to the fact that I used PVA glue.

 

 

My best regards, Alexander.

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I have finished the covering of the second broadside.

Sketching and putting treenail in place are still to be done. I’m still trying out on samples. As I will have to drill a lot, the manual drill will not be the best solution, I had to work on and upgrade my mini-drill. I bought it on flea-market a long time ago, but couldn’t find any use of it. Yesterday I installed a small switch and now I’m testing it.

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