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SHIPSCAT

IL Leudo by SHIPSCAT (Jolene) - Mamoli - scale 1:34

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4 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

So the idea I came up with was dry fit the last frame 13 as this has about 40mm slot in it and will be very stable, then I started gluing the frames one by one dry fitting the 2mm x 4mm wooden strip as I go, this will keep the frames in a central position till the glue dries.

 

Good thinking, Jo. It might also help to use a spirit level along that wooden strip to check that everything is nice 'n' even as you go ...Level.png.44faaa8c9ff331063f420af13f359188.png

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5 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

BUT as the instructions are very vague (useless) I had to do some thinking, OK you guys we do think sometimes 😀.

So that excludes you from a certain group

 

Good thinking Jo. Not only Sam's sharp chissel comes in handy, a sharp mind is a real asset too.

 

Did you check if the frames are square on the keel (90 degrees)? You can use your lego for it as it is square on all corners

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Jo. although people are giving you good advice as to what to think about, my advice is do not go overboard with attempted precision in your first build. I promise your ship will not suddenly explode into flames if one of the bulkheads is one degree out from square, the worst that will happen is you'll have to taper filler blocks a little. It's always better to be perfect, but you need practice being basically accurate first and shouldn't slow yourself to a crawl trying for perfect.

 

Speaking of filler blocks, I recommend you put them in between all bulkheads, I wish I had done so at first and not had to try to retrofit them later. I also promise that doing so will make your planking go much easier, with more accurate results and considerably less frustration about filling flat spots. That's one extra step that is in my opinion worth the time spent. Balsa is fine for this purpose and therefore very easy to sand.

 

And I'll let you know if you need to answer me ;)

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7 hours ago, vossiewulf said:

Balsa is fine for this purpose and therefore very easy to sand

Hello vossiewulf.

I have been reading on this forum about balsa blocks so I ordered some along with some glue, should arrive today.

Thank you for your comments.

 

Jo.

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10 hours ago, cog said:

Did you check if the frames are square on the keel (90 degrees)? You can use your lego for it as it is square on all corners

Hello Cog

 

Yes I did use lego on some frames, but some have only about 10mm slots in them and it was hard to keep them vertical that is why I put the strip down the centre of the frames as I glued them one by one.

I did my best to get the same gap on each side with out moving them.

 

Jo.

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Hello shipmates

 

I thought I would do a little planking GASP you are all saying 😅.

I decided to do the lower deck that is under the cabin.

 

The instructions say fit part 23 in place then plank it, so I thought that I would plank it first then fit it, if I mess it up it would not matter as you cannot see it when the cabin goes on.

I used some Danish oil for the planks.

 

Jo.

 

1817409941_ILLEUDO9_0004.thumb.jpg.213e85ac285970474218b847a0699b2a.jpg423944817_ILLEUDO9_0006.thumb.jpg.cdaf8016a1063528132310eaaeb6ba95.jpg

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3 hours ago, S.Coleman said:

looks flimsy

Hello S Coleman

 

I have to agree with you it is very flimsy.

I have just started the lower deck planking and I have just realised I have pushed one frame out of alignment.

 

I don't understand model ship building at all as this is my first wooden ship build.

 

I cannot see why you have to put decks on the lower part as you don't see them, only if you have the covers off the top deck.

Surely it would have been better to have a higher keel with longer slots for the frames and not hollowed out ones like I have got now, but hey what do I know, I am just thinking out load.

 

Jo.

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Are the bulkheads/frames glued to anything yet?  I would hope they're glued to the keel already.

 

The lower deck will stiffen things up a lot.  A higher keel might help but kit makers have their reasons... usually costs.   You've got the right idea with the wood piece down the centerline.  Do you have some extra you can slip into place on the other two grooved areas?  Pin the stiffener planks if you can though gluing would be preferable (not sure if some timber will be in there later).   If there's timber to be glued in those slots, look ahead in the instructions.  You might be able to glue them in now before doing anything else.

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

I cannot see why you have to put decks on the lower part as you don't see them, only if you have the covers off the top deck.

Now you can still decide to keep the covers off or on. Besides you do not need to fix the covers shut. As Mark wrote it all helps stiffening the frame. This would look even flimsier ...

500x750.jpg.0b6f7e02782d8428a4a33733eef6b40a.jpg

Edited by cog

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JO, you have the beginnings of a hull! Woo Hoo! AS the others said the decking will help strengthen the hull. I am not an engineer, but I believe what you are creating is a truss by planking the lower deck. If you have some scrap when you finish with the stringers on the upper deck you could also add some additional stringers between the bulkheads. Just measure the distance between the bulkheads at the keel and cut and glue them on right about the deck/bulkhead transition. just make sure they wont interfere with the decking or the bulwarks later. Depending on whether the interior gets planked also you could add additional stringer at the tips of the bulkheads. I am not familiar with your ship, another member may see a reason not to do that. I have no doubt they will jump in and correct me. Then we will both  learn something.

Sam

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23 hours ago, mtaylor said:

can slip into place on the other two grooved areas?

Hello Mark

Yes I have strips of 3mm x 3mm wood that goes into the slots, but if I put them in before the planking of the lower deck I could not do the planking.

 

Jo.

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First rate work @SHIPSCAT for you first wooden ship build. My first wooden build was the Race Horse and was a couple of months on just sanding the hull right. All because of excess glue showing up, then learned I didn't need that much to hold the planks in place. That was 25 years ago which taught me a bunch on wooden builds as wonderful sites as this one didn't exist as of yet. The race Horse took me a year and half to complete.

 

Here's a couple images of her, still holding up after building all those years ago. 

20190406_030211.thumb.jpg.f1fc17ee8d48076f04df7784a8a3a71a.jpg

20190406_030241.thumb.jpg.3d5250f2b7956b66c4d0963ba364e799.jpg

Yep the flag is wrong as the original England flag deteriorated after many years. So I turned her into a CW Confederate privateer.  

 

So keep up the great work on yours as it will become a wonderful family heirloom.

 

 

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Jolene, as you can see here, sanding those planks once in place is going to be tricky. In those cases, it's best to fully sand and prepare the parts before installing them, doing so at least considerably reduces the need to sand into corners and around things.

 

Also you can level a wood surface like that by scraping with a sharp Xacto blade, often faster than sanding.

 

That said, balance what I am saying against how much those planks will really be seen.

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Gidday Jo.

Excess glue is a pain.

I've learnt the hard way about "Squeeze Out".

Scraping the wood may be quicker and more practical as sanding in small confined spaces is difficult.

You can try both methods and adopt the one you are most comfortable with.

Again, I admire your positive attitude.

Keep up the good work.

Mark.

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Hello all

 

Thank you all for the advice.

 

Sam this is for you.

I could say I am going up the apple and pears but we don't have any in my house.

I have to get the army and navy ready for tea but first I have to do my barnet fair on my crusty bread.

I have to scarpa flow now.

 

Jo.

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Hello Sam

 

My grandfather was a cockney and his sayings rubbed off on my mother she used to say them now and then.

So the words mean, apple and pears (stairs), army and navy (gravy), barnet fair (hair), crusty bread (head), scarpa flow (go), adam and eve (believe)

 alligator (later), bees and honey (money), biscuits and cheese (knees), bacon and eggs (legs).

 

Jo.

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