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IL Leudo by SHIPSCAT (Jolene) - Mamoli - scale 1:34

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Odd, even endgrain on balsa is soft, balsa is soft which ever way you cut it, although, cutting cross grain will be slightly harder. Take a rough file and work it down to a sandable "thickness", or a small hand saw to cut it back

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Jo,

this is my whispering voice, we are a gentle bunch here, we will never yell at you. 

Carl is right (he does that from time to time😂😂) a good rasp should take that down with no problem. Just take your time. When you get within about a millimeter switch to some sand paper on a stick or one of those emery boards you ladies use to make your Niall’s nice. 

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Jo, Like Sam has the tendency to mixup the letters in some words, you would barly notice it though, I have the tendency to be somewhat direct. Say it as it is ... In actual fact most of us are whimps is what Sam says, including me :D 

Enjoy the rasping and sanding. So far you do not do any worse than most of us have done, or still do ... probably you do better

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2 hours ago, src said:

Niall’s nice

👍😎

as you have seen Carl and I poke good natured fun at each other. 

also you are fairing (not faring) you Hull now. Be sure to spend some time in the help forums on the best way to do that. 

Sam

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21 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

the man next door said it is end grain I was cutting (what ever that is).

Jo, end grain is the grain of wood seen when it is cut across the growth rings. Rather than cutting a plank of wood the length of the trunk, end grain wood is actually cut at a 90-degree angle to the grain. It is always HARD on sandpaper so if you do have to work it make sure you are using a new piece of sandpaper to get the maximum use out of it. The reason it is so hard to sand (even a soft wood like balsa) is because you are usually working against the grain of the wood.

Don't give up hope girl. We have all been there - it's called a learning curve :rolleyes:

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Hello shipmates

 

Sam and Carl you two make me blush at times, maybe I should replace my photo with a shipwreck as that is how I feel at times 😫.

 

I have glued the last block in now, that is all I did yesterday as I had the tree people in to cut 5 trees down, not big ones but they was growing very high, I am sure when I looked at then they grew about 10cm a day.

 

Re rasp, I take it that is some sort of file, I have not got one so of to Bunnings again (we are on first name terms now, hi Jo back again, what are you getting today).

 

I was going to use my Dremel with a sanding drum on it, but if you all say use a rasp then a rasp it will be.

 

I have the sanding stick but no nails now 😒.

 

Jo.

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Posted (edited)

Jolene, you'll find it easier if you get the balsa to the right thickness to fit between two bulkheads, and then mark each side by tracing the bulkhead in front and in back on each side of the balsa piece. You can then use a scroll saw or any number of other tools to shape it down very close to what is needed while off the model. Then when you glue them in, there's just a bit of sanding to do.

 

Also, if you can, you try to orient the grain of the filler blocks lengthwise to the ship, that makes shaping the them much easier. 

Edited by vossiewulf

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21 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

the man next door said it is end grain I was cutting (what ever that is).

    The man next door (and Wallace) are correct.  No matter what kind of wood it is, the end grain is always tougher to cut across. (as you have discovered)  Think of wood as a bundle of long skinny tubes (wood cells) bound together that run longitudinally the length of the wood.  My sketch here shows some of these cells very greatly enlarged bundled together as I said. 

100_5449.thumb.JPG.c06dcdc446ba571553030bf39f5bc64c.JPG    They serve as conduits for moisture and nutrients to travel from the tree roots to the other parts of the tree.  When you look closely at the end of any board they will appear as round or oval shapes in alternating lighter and darker rings called growth rings.   If you cut down a tree and look at the stump, you can tell how old the tree was by counting the number of these darker rings as each one indicates the end of a years growth.     

    On the other hand, if the grain appears as long stretched out lines as shown on the sketch you are looking at the side or longitudinal grain.  When you cut wood along these lines you are following the grain of the wood and will find it much easier to slice through.  Just take a chisel and try cutting your wood in both directions.  You will find that when you follow the side grain it will smoothly slice off easily,  but the chisel will want to chatter across it on the end grain for a much rougher cut. 

    Whenever possible, going with the grain will be easier than going against the grain. (Somewhat like life in general, I guess.):rolleyes:

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2 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

Re rasp

Approach carefully, generally rasps are very rough on wood, leaving deep scratches. Don't make them deeper than you intend to sand. Not sure why it is necessary, any plane, chisel, gouge, or knife should be able to trim down balsa easily if they are sharp. But a rasp will indeed remove wood quickly.

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Avoid using a rasp if you have a Dremel.

Use it like power sandpaper.😂 It is much kinder to creating the shape that you want to achieve.

 

Think of fairing the hull to the art of shipbuilding. Your wanting to create a shape with the framing  that allows the hull planking to conform to the ideal shape that is required with the perfect recreation of the ship you are building.

 

There are lots of tutorials on the this site that will help you to achieve this.

 

Just as 'Rome wasn't built in a day', the same applies to model ship building (or any modelling), take your time, measure twice etc.....

 

Your building an awesome kit, keep up the great work. 😊

 

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Jo,

Dont let Carl or I make you blush, we are just playing with each other. And as far as shipwreck, you're doing fine.

 

In my opinion everyone should own a couple of dozen chisels and at least 5-6 hand planes, they are great tools to own. I warn you though, once you start down that path your life changes, its like many women with shoes or the Little Black Dress. You can never have enough. In fact, when my wife says to me "Honey, dont you have enough "X" " I will walk to her closet look inside at her shoe collection and say "No." Then you get to learn how to sharpen them..... They are next to useless until you learn to flatten the back and hone a good solid edge. There are as many tools and methods to sharpen a chisel as there are ways to fair a hull.

 

Plane, chisel, file or rasp, follow the curves, take your time and above all HAVE FUN with what you re doing, "Life is Easy."

 

Sam

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1 hour ago, src said:

its like many women with shoes or the Little Black Dress

Hello Sam

I am a jean and top girl myself but I do like other things 😉 that I will not mention on this forum, but I do know what you are talking about, I used to purchase $800 - $1,000 dresses then I came to my senses.

 

I will go back to Bunnings and have a good look round for the tool you have said above.

 

Thank you all for your advice and help and not forgetting the likes.

 

Jo.

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Gidday Jo.

Ask for a staff discount at Bunnings. 

(Forgive my attempt at humour).

Regarding the use of a rasp, that is a serious file that really does create deep scratches. 

Be cautious and try not to file the frames when filing the filler blocks.

Personally I would use the Dremel but different strokes for different folks.

I hope I haven't confused the issue.

All the best.

Mark.

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Jo,

The cautions about rasps are well founded. I cant comment for the others but when I think of a "rasp" for hobby work this is what I think of:

 

1782602618_ScreenShot2019-04-16at6_00_39AM.thumb.png.a2695ddbf6c27a5f35b41aa81b52fb38.png

 

They are small and not overly aggressive. But you can still do a lot of damage quickly if your not careful. The trick is knowing when to stop and go to a finer tool. What might actually be better since you have limited experience with hand tools - something I should remind myself of more when talking to you here - is more of a coarse file. Or even the Dremmel that others have mentioned. I personally would make hash out of most anything I touch with a Dremmel. There are many here that do quite well with one. Like Mark said, "Different Strokes"

 

Sam

 

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11 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

I used to purchase $800 - $1,000 dresses then I came to my senses.

Ouch ... you started model building, you call that coming to your sences ... (don't listen to me, listen to Sam ... he's old and wise, I'm just older (than Sam) and ugly)

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3 hours ago, cog said:

I'm just older (than Sam) and ugly)

My dear Carl surly not old and  ugly, I like you no matter how old and ugly you are, it must be your sense of humour 🤣.

I was a PA for a large firm in Melbourne for years and was paid very well,  and I shopped at some of the best shops.

You must know what it is like, boss takes you to a party to meet people so you have to look the part don't you, smile at people act silly boss gets contract, he is happy I get paid well then spend money on dresses for the next party.

 

Jo.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, SHIPSCAT said:

surly not old and  ugly,

Ugly and old would fit me too

 

By the way (I'm not the abbreviation type, those turn me daft as I mix up several languages if I use them e.g.: BTW is VAT in Dutch) have you decided on your tools of destruction to bring the balsa in line? I liked Sams rasps, haven't got those (yet) ... I think you would do good using the dremel to get the bulk off, and sand the remainder with one of your precious emery boards ... still ... it's your party ... looking forward to the result

Edited by cog

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Good evening Jo (I presume it isn't night yet, since we do not know the general location of your whereabouts)

 

I always forget the meaning of the "CEO" (must be an aversion to the type) thanks for reminding me. Although, you do not have to shout to me :)  When I hear or read "chief" I see an indian with a feathered headdress before me, you can understand it is hard to take such a person serious ...

 

Could be you thought "Netherlands" was somewhere in the States as New York used to be New Amsterdam ... and concerning the double Dutch, only when I excrete words ...

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How goes the build Jo?? Get your balsa shaved down?

 

E-gads Tony! Community Engagement Officers??? What is it with bureaucracy's have to assign soft touchy names to everything? Assuming they do what our Parking Enforcement does here in Los Angeles they should be called Revenue Enhancement Collectors, RECr's for short.

It might be hard to take a person in feathered headdress serious today, but if General Custer had taken the Sioux and Chief Crazy Horse more serious he may not have ended life looking like a porcupine. :)

 

Sam

 

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Sam, that is because State side likes it with millitairy precisions, whilst ancient Europeans are older, and softer, hence soft touchy names.

Weaponry has changed dramatically over time Sam. I recon nowadays nobody would be looking like a porcupine, more like Swiss Ementaler

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Hello Carl

What about domestic cheese like edamer and gouda. don`t they contain enough gas bubbles?

We should return to the original topic, I think.

And I think, that you`re the one, who lives closest to my home town.

I live some 20 km south of the place, where the rhine divides to waal and oude rhin.

Maar ik spreek geen nederlands.

 

Michael

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16 hours ago, cog said:

Netherlands

Hello Carl

I am fully aware of where the Netherlands (Holland) are, flat lands full of bikes and tulips ☺️.

You will tell me next that you are related to the boy that put his finger in the Dyke.

 

Now what can I make out of that word Excrete.

 

As for the wider area where I live, did you not read my post 😉 or did the water come over the Dyke and get into your eyes.

 

T T F N.

 

Jo.

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Hello Sam

 

Re balsa wood, I tried the rasp but it was hard going, was afraid of breaking the frames and getting nowhere with it.

So I reverted back to the knife then the Dremel with the drum sander on it.

Will get my finger nail files out and finish one part of the blocks, then have 3 more to do.

I will try and post a photo soon.

 

Jo.

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