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semorebutts

Missouri by Semorebutts - Trumpeter - 1/200 - Pontos detail up & advanced add on

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Learned this the hard way!!  In finishing your baseboard to minimize warpage you have to “balance” it.  Whatever you do to the top surface, do to the bottom.   You therefore need to seal both the top and bottom against moisture.

 

My personal opinion is that this ship would not have been heavily weathered in service.  The ship was a prestigious command, with a large crew to keep busy when not in action.  Like the old navy expression goes “If it doesn’t move, paint it.”  And remember, a warship was judged by the condition of its boats.

 

I am enjoying your posts.  I am not a plastic modeler and am amazed at the detail that you guys are able to incorporate into these small scale models.  Nice work!

 

Roger

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5 minutes ago, semorebutts said:

Oh wow thanks for the info and feedback. It definitely gets humid in New Hampshire. I love the oak!    

On a side note my new crane is just about done. 

 

I didn't realize you're in New Hampshire. I'm flying up there for a week next month. How's the weather going to be? Probably be a big change from my day to day tropical experience.😵

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6 hours ago, semorebutts said:

Oh wow thanks for the info and feedback. It definitely gets humid in New Hampshire. I love the oak!    

On a side note my new crane is just about done.

Well if you are interested get me some dimensions on the slap Oak is cheap down here about $3-4 a board foot it's a free offer to yea my contribution you might say.A nice platform or case makes a big difference this is my man cave one side of the shop is the  office area 7'X16' with a built in case to the wall and the other side is wood work 23'X16' not big enough any more.Email me if you are interested.;) kevin

Man Cave 001.JPG

Man Cave 010.JPG

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Oh wow thank you for the offer.  As much as I would like to. That would be an awkward thing to ship lol. I found a 6 foot Slab as cheap as $40. But I might just stick to the pine for now.  Maybe I will take you up on the offer on the next build. 😁

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Posted (edited)

Everybody's going to have their own opinion, but I think it looks right. Not too much, not too little. Well done.

Edited by CDW

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On 6/29/2019 at 6:24 PM, semorebutts said:

Cut it long? 

I do wood work some always better to cut it long than short meaning which I did not convey well was that going light now on your staining leaves the door open to do more later if needed.

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That ... that is all up to you. Consider what you want to establish and what would hence be appropriate. E.g. you weather the hull, would you, or wouldn't you weather the deck (super)structures?

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What do you want to look at? A partly weathered ship, e.g. a weathered hull and clean, crisp, new looking deck and super structures (or vice versa) or an entire weathered build. You are the one looking at it, and you need to ask yourself if you can live with the one or the other ...

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On 7/2/2019 at 11:25 AM, semorebutts said:

I have to weather the super structure now right? Since the hull is weathered.    The deck.... probably. 

That is entirely up to you.

 

However, the Deck Department laways had people out painting the ship (any ship).  Main deck especially, and any areas around "brass."  The Iowas were all configured as flagships, with quarters to house Admirals and their staffs.  A Captain with an Admiral aboard has even more headaches than normal.  And, embarked Admirals often have less to do than they might.  Which leaves them free to make "suggestions" to the Captain.

 

Generally, anything radiating or emitting RF did not get painted as often.  Things that required scaffolds or bo's'n's slings to paint (stacks, masts, etc.) would weather some.  So, things like the stack caps would get flaky and rough, no matter how much the XO would like to send a troubel-making section of Deck Apes up to go paint the things for their sins.  Which produces a unique look, where the hull would get splotchy and worn, and arieals, masts and extremes would get "crusty" (not rusty, per se, but not clean, either--think black streaky).

 

Surfaces ahead of breakwaters would get grimy, too.  As would forward surfaces of things like bridge wings and the like (where scaffold or sling would be needed to paint).  One of the most realistic weathering items to include are patches of brand new paint, with rectangular edges.  But, such things are hard to model and can make little sense for those never at sea.

 

Also, during WWII, capital ships often got pierside yard time twice a year.  Or they would wind up on a mooring in reasonably protected water.  To where punts could be gotten out to refresh hull paint.  And, add in the frequency of changes in Camouflage Measure being used.  So. really, paint was seldom more than about 90 days old.

 

That's 2¢ an a grain of salt or two.  And from having the been the person the XO might drop in on and make "suggestions" about the best employment of one's division of the Deck Department (or rather a lot of suggestions).  Which will teach a person to observe things fro mthe XOs point of view.

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14 minutes ago, CapnMac82 said:

That is entirely up to you.

I was an operations chief who worked under the direct command of a US Army Major General for the last 10 years of my career. Rest assured, it would be a very bad day (maybe the worst) of your entire life if he found your area of responsibility did not meet standards. Everything, and I mean everything, must meet a standard, and there will be hell to pay when standards are not met.

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In my 24 years of it, I met more than a few who had never seen a rock whitewashed enough, yey needed close supervision so as the choose to correct Metro train to take them toe the Puzzle Palace.  Such is life.

 

In or quest to make scale miniatures of reality, we can sometime get to a point of following prototype the the point that lay person uncomfortably smile and say "That's nice." 

 

Some folks just don't grok that signalman platforms were often covered in chestnut-colored linoleum, or that wood decks in WWII were not "holystoned" but given a camouflage color(s).  If you expect to see a ship that is all gray, seeing one that is part bluse, and seveal grays, and the barrels and gun houses have different colors, tops and sides can make them pause.

 

We in the modeling community can be guilty of a similar thing.  Really, 20mm ought to have blobby canvas covers on them, and not need 57 PE and resin parts.  But, making that look "right" is ever so difficult.  We drill out gun muzzles, even though everything from 3" and up got a tompion.

 

But, unless on a commission build, we are building for ourselves, so, thus, to our ownselves we should be true.

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Bilge  keel... interesting. 

Sorry it’s been sloooooow and booooring. I’ve just been so busy with life.  If the workshop wasn’t 27 miles away it would be much faster I’m sure. 

Anyhoo, I’m finally done with weathering the hull I think. I’m going for a “ humans suddenly go extinct 2 years ago, as a result  it’s been neglected in dry dock Ever since” look. 

This side came out better. This will be the display side. First was the grime for red hulls. 

765837BC-BA51-493C-BD55-D2BB859073C5.thumb.jpeg.29f9b76c6e9263aeb7291958de9c03ec.jpeg322776E6-F3AF-45B2-A69B-23EAC26F098D.thumb.jpeg.2016b8540212e7bfd4cb7ee608d23d02.jpeg261BB5BB-2EC3-4FAD-ABBC-1A25C02B801D.thumb.jpeg.9ebe1e1f85222acf15a8180fe32dee49.jpeg

next I put the rust streaks in. Not a good photo though. 

1D68DAA7-8D94-4900-B417-887851535801.thumb.jpeg.4856baba6b63cf9fb1c827e1a77486fa.jpeg

then last was the salt. You can also see how I did it. I brushed it on at the waterline, waited 5 minutes then just pulled it down with a flat brush.  It’s probably the wrong way to do it but it’s done now. D267A645-860C-457F-AC0F-86A6AB768601.thumb.jpeg.cb96baeba9add10e7e01cd6b0275c15c.jpeg382AEE85-E5AE-4B08-9971-FCFAFF41B686.thumb.jpeg.f8030206a229b6f2ce65b74fb68857ec.jpeg

now I can finally move onto other stuff like the props. 

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bring you salt streaks all the way from the deck level down, not merely below the waterline, it doesn't look real. Salt is left on the upper hull as it washes from the deck or scuppers, and when the water evaporates it becomes visible as a streak. It builds up during time and can take on a real stalactite type  form. Have a look here

 colin-kc-21.jpg?itok=ZhOO157B&timestamp=

(from https://www.straitstimes.com/)

Not a fancy example, but couldn't find something quickly

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16 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

is that a hole in the hull?  couldn't use the link

 

14 hours ago, Erik_1991 said:

Can't use the link either, but doesn't look good, the whole crew is watching and a oil spill boundary thingy is encircling the vessel..

The site's mention is just for CR purpose. I can get on it. Maybe some sites don't like US interference, as some US news sites don't want Europeans on theirs ...

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