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Missouri by Semorebutts - Trumpeter - 1/200 - Pontos detail up & advanced add on

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4 minutes ago, cog said:

good example of the salt streaks running down from deck level

I was thinking the same thing. It is also interesting how pronounced the streaking is on the stern compared to the sides of the ship. I suppose it could just be lighting but the heavy streaking does not show up in the video either, some of which is pretty close up.

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Salt streaks aren't very noticeable I found whilst searching on the net. Only in some very severe cases. There isn't much diference between dark or light coloured hulls either. Places you will see it best are those where the water flows down the hull because of a breakwater, scuppers, transition from surrounded deck to an open deck (bulwark or not). On the image from Lou, there may be something which forces the water down aft

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I agree.

On some ships at certain times in their lives, there may be signs of weathering or even heavy weathering depending on size of the ship, location and seasons and other factors. But as a rule most military ships seem to be fairly well maintained over all. This is even more pronounced  when dealing with capitol ships and especially true with the Missouri class ships. I don't think I have ever seen a picture of one of this class of battleships with anything seriously out of order even in close up pictures. The one exception is the Kamikaze hit on the starboard side of the Missouri. They never bothered to repair that damage.

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My question is this though.  You see how I put rust streaks on the holes in the hull. Now do I have to do that to every porthole of the superstructure to keep it consistent?  I guess I don’t know yet how I’m should weather the superstructure.   I have time to think bout it. 

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You do not need to do it on every porthole, every scupper, etc. It should be random, as should be the "severity". As Lou wrote already, most capitol vessels were maintained quite good. Better to little than to much

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5 hours ago, semorebutts said:

Now do I have to do that to every porthole of the superstructure to keep it consistent?

Just a suggestion if I may that is worth every penny you paid for it!;)

 

If you can identify the water discharge ports along the hull I would start with the weathering there and make those places the first "streaks" either a different color than the remaining hull or more rusted if you insist on having rust on the hull. Then I would go to places that are hard to maintain while at sea but receive the heaviest wear. The Hawse pipes where the anchor and chain will almost certainly tear away the paint. The steel plating under the areas of the fore deck where the anchor chain drags when the capstans pull them in and let them out. The area of the capstans where they come in contact with the chain. The area at the cut water of the bow where the bow wave is formed and mixes heavily with air as the ship moves through the water. This is a high friction/non maintainable area of the ship as well and even US Coast Guard ships which are ALWAYS showboats will show some paint wear in this area when returning to port. 

 

I am sure that others can come up with more and better ideas as i am in no way ANY KIND of expert but I would think that the areas I mentioned would be a better candidate for rust streaks Than the few portholes on this ship that would probably be well painted and are made of bronze or brass anyway.

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On 7/26/2019 at 8:07 PM, lmagna said:

The steel plating under the areas of the fore deck where the anchor chain drags when the capstans pull them in and let them out. The area of the capstans where they come in contact with the chain.

That moulded raised area is actually covered wioth non-skid.  During WWII, that was a coating that had some asphaltic material in it; ost war it was a rubberized compound that had grit embedded in it while wet.

Repair compound ws stockpiled aboard, usually next to the forward paint locker, and the Special Sea and Anchor Detail was meant to not secure until  touch-ups were complete (unless in horrible seas).  Ditto pain on the exposed chain shots on deck and the wildcat flutes on the capstans.

On capital ships, particularly flag ships with Flag Officers aboard, the SSaAD would usually send a hand down the hawsepipe to touch up the paint on the anchor shank and such of the hawse pipe as could be reached.

 

Capital ships were seldom more than three months out of a port or organized anchorage.  NOw, the bottom of the breakwater might collect some grunge as one got closer to the Area of Operations, where GQ drills got in the way of ongoing maintenance.  Mast legs and tops would be similar--just too much work to get people up there for paint duty (and painting was for Deck Apes, not Sparkies keeping the gear working).

Similarly, the steel deck around the ground tackle could collect crud, as it was exposed to the sea, as would the area in under the gun mounts on the Iowas.  The forwards edge of the wooden deck wouls go gray and show some weathering, too.

 

Mind, barring anything but a Saturday Inspection in port, or at GQ, the 20mm mounts would be in a blobby canvas cover painted to match the local camo color.  And, there ought be tompions in the 5" and 16" barrels--but casual obervers do not grok that at all.

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Thanks

I did not realize how much attention was applied to the fore deck and gear while leaving harbor or under underway. While I have seen plenty of pictures of seamen spraying down the anchor chain while it was coming aboard I had no idea repainting was also underway at that point. I always thought that was a chore reserved for when the ship returned to port and could normally be approached at a more leisurely and thorough time frame..

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13 hours ago, lmagna said:

I had no idea repainting was also underway at that point. I always thought that was a chore reserved for when the ship returned to port and could normally be approached at a more leisurely and thorough time frame..

Merchant vessels, which have smaller crews can't "afford" to put that sort of manpower on the foredeck.
The LPO (or CPO/Warrant) in charge of the Sea and Anchor Detail has a long list of things to mind setting or weighing anchor.  They are expected to watch the shots as they come on deck and note if any have excessive wear or need repainting.  The deck detail is expected to wash the rust powder that comes up out of the chain locker with the shots is washed overboard.   In foreign anchorages, the Detail will need to ensure the buoy is bent on to the deployed anchor.

On an Iowa, the Sea nd Anchor detail will likely have an Ensign or a JG (and a Warrant, like as not) supervising the detail.  They--the 20-25 or so on deck, and who ever is needed for the capstan machinery belowdecks-- have a number of things to sort out.  Like striking off most of the stopper and lashing them out of the way so the shots can ride out without interference.  Somebody has to mind all the pins and shackles and the like for the pelican hooks on all the stoppers.   There's even more to  do if it's to be a two-point mooring, so that there will be a swivel on deck and four split links.  And that, before rigging the snatch block to which up enough shots, to flake out on deck to fit in the other anchor (unless the rode is long enought to set the swivel over the side --usually through the bullnose).   

Capital ships are large, but they are limited places at sea.  There's a long history of walking the deck for a bit of exercise, particularly if it's nice out.  So, there's a very real possibility that the foredeck will be visited by the Department Heads, the XO, the Captain, the Admiral, his Chief of Staff or the like--all of whom gennerally have experience in operating a ship at sea.  (Oh, and the GunnO [head of the Gunnery Deartment] is going to tour all the gun mounts on a middling regular basis.)

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