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fnkershner

Alert Class Tug by fnkershner - 3D printed - 1:35 scale

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No they are not the same Floyd

 

I do not know for certain what the composition of hot glue is other than it is considered a hot melt thermal plastic and by using heat to enable it to flow, (Somewhat) it does not need the solvents needed in other similar glues. It comes in different heat and hardness ranges and I would have to assume the formula would have to be different. 

 

Hot glues that I have used tend to set hard, or relatively hard as soon as they cool. RTV or silicone glues remain quite soft and rubbery, (Think bathtub calking) and usually require several hours for the solvent to evaporate from the solution to set up.  

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Hmm.... interesting. The RTV I used back in my tech writing days in engineering was a compound like a silicon gel though it also came in liquid form for brushing on.  

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Maybe I'm thinking of something else than... clear, pliable, insulates (electric connections) and weather proof for the most part.

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Posted (edited)

"RTV stands for room temperature vulcanizing. RTV silicone begins to cure immediately upon being exposed to air, as opposed to the curing agents in water-based sealants (for example, latex). ... Unlike the vulcanization of rubber, the process of forming an RTV sealant takes place at room temperature.

 

Permatex® Clear RTV Silicone Adhesive Sealant. ... Permatex® Clear RTV SiliconeAdhesive Sealant is waterproof and flexible. Temperature range -75°F to 400°F (-59°C to 204°C); resists water, weather, and vibration."

 

Probably the same stuff you used, Mark.  I used it (RTV) years ago to reinstall 100++ year old prisms in a 4th Order Fresnel Lens - prisms had come loose due to age - they used to use a red lead, white lead, linseed oil mix in the old lighthouse days. 

Edited by Jack12477

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21 minutes ago, Jack12477 said:

RTV stands for room temperature vulcanizing

That's the stuff Mark and Jack.

 

Dries rubbery and will hold almost anything. I have used it to hold large bollards on RC tugs and never had one come loose. On one ship I had something like a 25# pull when jerking the towline and 5 or 6# constant and could pull from the rear capstan with no problems at all. It was held in place with a dab of RTV that was paper thin and  about 3/4" across.

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Posted (edited)

Ok time for yet another update on this project -

 

The tug is in the paint shop for the final coat of paint & the Pilot house is in the electronics lab while we finish the wiring of the Navigation lighting. Today I will cut the acrylic for the stand. Final assembly should be this Saturday. 

 

The pictures you see below are for the barge. We started with a template of the frame, which was 3D printed. This was used to create 6 frames. 3 frames for the bow and 3 for the stern. These were then attached to 1/8" birch plywood, which will for the deck. From there we will be forming the bow and stern shapes. then final sheathing with more birch ply. Once the hull is done we will paint and attach various deck furniture which has been 3D printed. Total length is 7 ft 2 inches. and she is 26 inches wide.

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Edited by fnkershner

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Posted (edited)

Ok so an update on the tug. Everything is completed except the wiring of the Lights. So in the pictures here you will see everything except the pilot house and the masts. All of the painting is complete and the decks have been installed. The thrusters are glued in place. All of the deck furniture is screwed down.

Note - Since the students will be using some of these parts the design called for being able to replace some of the parts. On the stern you will see a block where the bollards can be raised to guide the tow line. Since this could break, the deck is removable so these bollards can be replaced. The story is the same with the thrusters. I expect the wiring to be completed this week. Please note the custom stand complete with waves. :) This was created on our laser. Once the Pilot house is completed, I will add railing to the main cabin top.

 

The customer has asked that we create a scale model of a bottle of Champagne for the Christening. :)  

 

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Edited by fnkershner

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Can anyone give me a pointer to some American flags? I had a web site for all kinds of flags but they are out of business. The tug definitely needs an American flag.

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My part of this project is coming to an end, the design of the barge.

There are a few small details to be fixed but also being a support to Floyd for remaining part of build period. 

Looking forward getting back to my Bluenose, who is waiting for attention again.

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Adding a rendering of the barge.

From not knowing anything about Fusion360 and it's tools, I have learned a lot.

A great tool where you can send files for 3d printing, laser cutting and CNC/routing machining.

The barge has it's name dedicated.

Alan Cote Barge.png

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I should mention that Alan Cote was a former president of the union that has worked closely with the Tongue Point School to help all of their students find jobs once the graduate. Alan passed away recently and the school has asked that the barge be dedicated to him. There is going to be a memorial service on the 18th. The rendering presented here by Per will be present at the service. I should mention that for those who graduate and with the help of the Union 98% get high paying jobs. Despite all the issues and challenges, it feels good to be able to help so many find a future in the Maritime industry. I will be visiting the school on the 4th of June and delivering the tug.

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Posted (edited)

Being part of this huge project, (which we never expected from the beginning) I am very honored that the barge design I did got the name of the former president of the union Alan Cote. I would never believe such a thing would happened.

As Floyd mentioned, it feels extremely good to have been part of a project that will benefit Maritime students in their learning process of getting a well paid job. 
I am thankful for all the support and help provided during this time.

Without Neal and Floyd this would have never happened.

This joint venture has been a challenge and a lot of hair tearing.... lol, but at the end we pulled it together.
I am very proud of what we have accomplished.

I know for sure there will be a picture of the barge and tug together while being used for educational purpose.

Edited by Nirvana

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Ok I promised a complete set of pictures before I deliver the tug on Wednesday. so here goes!

 By the way Ron thanks for the tip on Word. It worked like a champ. The Tug is completed right down to the decals and all the details on the mast. I must say that Neal did a great job rewiring all the LEDs on the mast using Magnet wire. This was definitely a team effort. After I return On Thursday we will begin to focus on the Barge. The Barge is scheduled to be delivered in July. We will have a christening party in Astoria for both vessels.

 

 

Broadside stbd - full 4716.jpg

Broadside stbd - waterline 4716.jpg

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House fwd - stbd side 4727.jpg

Port Side Aft - quartering 4743.jpg

Port Side Ladder 4751.jpg

Thruster 4749.jpg

Thrusters 4747.jpg

Winch aft 4740.jpg

Winch foredeck 4736.jpg

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So here is another update on this project. I expect to finish and deliver everything by the end of this July. So first I want to share with a bit of my trip to Astoria. My wife and I arrived before lunch and delivered the tug model to the Seamanship program at Tongue Point. Everyone was very excited and enjoyed playing with the lights. In fact the next morning I had to recharge the battery they had used the lights so often. :)

 

The school is located in what used to be a US Navy Seaplane Base. There is enough barracks to house 600. Currently there are 480 students enrolled in one of the 10 programs offered at this location. As mentioned above my customer was the Seamanship program. I don't know much about the other programs offered here. Anyway I am quite impressed. They have 120 students. They come from all over the US. In 2 years they have earned a High School diploma and either an Able Bodied Seaman certification or a QMED (engineer) cert from the Coast Guard. At Graduation they are presented with membership papers in the Union, the challenge coin pictured below, and the Guarantee of a job paying over $75,000 a year.

 

The School has a retired Coast Guard Buoy tender to use as part of the training. I was there to ride up the Columbia river to Portland for the Rose Festival. The Buoy Tender is named the Ironwood. I invite you to look her up on the web. she has a long and historic pedigree. During our 10 hour trip I got to meet some of the 55 students acting as crew. It was an great trip.

 

 

Challenge coin pair sea-anc.jpg

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So the next phase of this project is the Fueling Barge. This model will be 2 ft. 2 inches wide, 7 ft. long., and the hull will be 6 inches tall. Since it is so large it is difficult to move around. So I am building in in 2 sections. The pictures you see below are of the finished and primed stern half of the barge. You will also see the model of the pump house which is painted Blue. I also have pictures of the frame of the bow. It is laying upside down on the deck.

 

 

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Barge bow cross-section 4819.jpg

Barge aft frames B 4816.jpg

Barge bow pair.jpg

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Ok time for yet another update on the barge. Hopefully we are on the home stretch and I can get some sleep. As a retired Professional manager I should know better. But I committed to the customer that this model would be delivered in July. Somehow every project fills the available time. And painting has been slow. You have to paint wait to dry and repeat. What you see in the pictures below is the completed Hull with all the Light fixtures in place. Not all are glued yet, and there are no bulbs. In case anyone asks the big squares are access panels for the wiring. Tomorrow we will complete the Control Panel. I am particularly happy with this. Also in parallel I am working on scale oil containment booms. But we will talk about the control panel and booms after the Barge is wired.

 

PS I hope from these Pictures you get an idea of the size of this model. It is 7' long and 26" wide.

 

 

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