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Old Collingwood

Mosquito B Mk IV - Revell - My next non-ship project

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Very nice story,OC.  I have a short story - During the war my Mother worked building aircraft in a factory in California (don`t know which factory) While my Father was overseas.  She said they called her "Ruthy the riveter" (her middle name was Ruth).  She is now almost 97 & in a nursing home with dementia & severe short term memory problems.  The sad part is that illegal aliens get more govt. benefits than her.

 

Mark

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5 hours ago, Ebomba said:

OC , thank you for sharing this great story, started me  to think of my father , he was a final inspector in Stratford Ct on the Corsair met my mother there, Thanks again

 

Best,

 

Ed

Thank you for that,  my late farther also did some  light work on  FAA  Corsairs  during the war,   great plane  over powered  for  their air frame, hence they needed to  keep their power down  - could have got a lot more  horse power out of it.

 

OC.

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5 hours ago, marktiedens said:

Very nice story,OC.  I have a short story - During the war my Mother worked building aircraft in a factory in California (don`t know which factory) While my Father was overseas.  She said they called her "Ruthy the riveter" (her middle name was Ruth).  She is now almost 97 & in a nursing home with dementia & severe short term memory problems.  The sad part is that illegal aliens get more govt. benefits than her.

 

Mark

Indeed  mark,   my late mum used  to work  as an ATS  working the land.

 

OC.

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Another good day  at the table,  I  firstly fitted the  stearing column  then the  hand brake,   next  I worked on the instrument panel, this  included  pe  front sections  including the clocks,  they had to be cut away  then  placed  with watery ca  onto a pe  base plate, in all there was three  sections, I left them to set  then  ran some nato black around the edges,  there  is also a back consul  that covers  the rudder pedals, this  too was fitted then painted black

After the assembly was set and dry  I glued it into place on the front  area.

 

This completes the  internal  cockpit  assembly  - next off  I will  fit some pe parts  to the inside walls of the cockpit area, then paint them accordingly.

 

OC.

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Another good day  - kicked off by  dry fitting the inner cockpit  against both frontal parts  to test  fit, at first  they would not meet  so I did some investigating  then  light sanding  - investigating  -  light sanding  etc etc etc.........I eventually  found the point where both side met  with the inside cockpit inside.

 

Next job  was  to start fitting all the pe side wall parts   some were quite fiddly  not just fitting but  picking up with  fine nose tweezers,  it took a few hours to  file off some plastic moldings not needed  - and re fit with pe,  I did this on both walls  then starting on the one side  a  ran some black and green paint  in thing layers  to preserve the detail.

I also made up the  range finding device for the nose  that is made up by transparency parts  and some pe.

 

So this is the stage so far - including a dry fit of the one side minus some more paint and dry brushing.

 

OC.

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OC, looking good. It pays to fine tune that floor to get your build fitting like it should. 👍

 

I sometimes wonder if the kit makers actually build up their kits, with the cockeyed fit at times. :unsure:

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26 minutes ago, Canute said:

OC, looking good. It pays to fine tune that floor to get your build fitting like it should. 👍

 

I sometimes wonder if the kit makers actually build up their kits, with the cockeyed fit at times. :unsure:

The floor and sides  had to have quite a lot sanded away  to get the sides to meet, even still  its a fairly tight  join  - not much wriggle room,   I will have to  join the bottom fist  then wait till its fully set before pulling and glue-ing the top in, that way I will  make the joins  as tight as possible.

 

OC.

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While researching the Revell  Mosquito  a few things  manufacturing errors  came to light  - firstly  the  main undercarriage units  are not quite the right length  and the  wheels  are made to large and to thin, giving her  a to  low  frontal height,  secondly  the spinners  are  two  flat and not pointed enough,   the work around  I have decided to try  are  to  reduce the drop of the rear oleo  leg by a few  mil,   and with the wheels  I managed to  get a pair of Airfix ones  (they are supposed to be more accurate)    with the  spinners  I will have a go at  making more of a point on them with careful sanding.

This should hopefully  help a bit.

 

OC.

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ya run into that quite a bit.......when parts are molded,  the corners and edges are not totally square,  so sandwiching the halves together shows gaps like crazy.  I tend to sand and scrape along the edges to square things up. then there's not a lot to do later.  look'in good so far......... ;) 

 

as for inaccuracies.......I don't think I've build one yet that was spot on.  that's why the aftermarket business is booming  ;)  

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2 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

ya run into that quite a bit.......when parts are molded,  the corners and edges are not totally square,  so sandwiching the halves together shows gaps like crazy.  I tend to sand and scrape along the edges to square things up. then there's not a lot to do later.  look'in good so far......... ;) 

 

as for inaccuracies.......I don't think I've build one yet that was spot on.  that's why the aftermarket business is booming  ;)  

Thank you denis,   same here with checking the edges  I have been doing a fair bit of checking and re checking  and making sure they are square,  an old trick I  picked up  -    is to put a slight bevel on the edges  so the facing edge is tighter  than the inward one.

 

OC.

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7 minutes ago, Canute said:

Your Mosi is coming along nicely, OC. More sanding to sweeten the gaps or some putty?

There not pushed together  correctly  yet  ken,   just taped loosely  - the idea is  I will concentrate getting a tight bond on the bottom first,  brace it with my clamps, leave it  over night, then when fully  glued  I will  do the same  to the top (nose area)  then the top  behind the cockpit.

First though  I will glue the inner assembly  to the one wall and bottom  to pull it in where the entrance hatch is  - as there is a gap underneath at the moment.

 

OC.

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3 minutes ago, mtaylor said:

Sounds like a good plan, OC.    I have a question... in the cockpit, there's an opening in the floor, is that an escape hatch?

Yep,  thats both the entrance and escape hatch  - the two man crew  get into it  via  a  narrow ladder  thats stored in a locker  between the outer skin and forward floor (the ladder  slides into itself like tripod leg).

 

OC.

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Good day all,   more work today  -  I decided to  glue the front fuselage  in one go  as my original idea would have bottle necked me,   it glued quite well  secured with tape  - all the seams closed ok,    while this was setting  I had a go at the wheels  - these needed  joining  together  then I worked on  creating a flat on each bottom  them  opening up the treads.

 

OC.

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I then decided to have a go at the remaining fuselage  section  - again in two sections  but with the rear wheel assembly needing building/painting/weathering  and fitting.  Because of the prob;em with the  wrong size main undercarriage  legs  - I rectified the tail dragger wheel  by filing away at the  tab where it sits  - I then reached a point where it  was closer to the bottom of the fuselage (it would have done this with additinal weight or when in a heavy flight mode  (fuel bombs etc).

After fitting the wheel unit  and cleaning up the edges (slight bevel on them)  I glued them together and held in place with tape.

 

So this is where I am at present.

 

OC.

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19 minutes ago, lmagna said:

Nice progress OC. At this rate she will be going on missions in another week or two!

Thanks Lou,   to be honest  I am dreading the  rattle can stage  - just dont want to  ruin it with shabby  spraying, I have read up and watched some videos on how to do it.

 

OC.

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