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Albatros D.V by CDW - Wingnut Wings - 1:32 Scale - Plastic

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4 minutes ago, Jim Rogers said:

Looks awesome

 

4 minutes ago, Old Collingwood said:

I love that color contrast mate  and the fit of the stab/elevators looks real good,   are the wings going to be the same camo pattern as the stab units?

 

OC.

Thanks to both of you for your comments.

Yes, the tops of the top and bottom wings will receive the same color combination.

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I should have mentioned earlier...these are home made turn buckles. Twisted micro wire gets inserted and glued into micro brass tubing. Flying wires are seized onto the twisted wire loops. Easy peasy.

 

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, CDW said:

I should have mentioned earlier...these are home made turn buckles. Twisted micro wire gets inserted and glued into micro brass tubing. Flying wires are seized onto the twisted wire loops. Easy peasy.

 

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Like them mate,   its amazing how much difference pe and metal fittings make to a kit, kind of gives that extra reasurance of strength and not forgetting realism,   please excuse the poor spelling  i suffer from word blindness sometimes  lol)

 

 

 

OC.

Edited by Old Collingwood

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With WW1 aircraft as well as some early WW2 aircraft, the airframes are covered with fabric then doped and painted. One can see the pronounced effect of the fabric stretched over the airframe where each wing rib is clearly seen by the imprint it makes upon the fabric. When modeling these aircraft, one wants to achieve the illusion of depth in the painted finish to simulate the stretched fabric covering the airframe, particularly between each wing rib.

 

Here you see the molded plastic wing. Over each rib is a "tape" that was used to strengthen the fabric where covered the ribs.

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To achieve the illusion of depth, each wing rib is preshaded with flat black on each side of each rib, leaving the rib tape it's natural plastic color. Once the color coats are sprayed on, the rib tapes will stand out in light contrast to the surrounding darker paint and giving the painted finish "depth".

When modeling and painting a steel ship, this is called oil canning. 

I use a business card or index card to cover each rib as I gradually preshade each side of each rib. Later in this thread, you'll see the clearly pronounced effect of the preshading on the finish paint.

 

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Posted (edited)

Here the color coats have been applied over the preshaded wings.

Colors are Tamiya, the mauve color being one mixed in the recommended ratio provided in the painting instructions.

A trace of paint slipped past my masking of the lower right wing that will require some touch up. 😕 Maybe I should leave it as-is just to add a human touch.

 

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Edited by CDW

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Thanks for the nice comments. 

 

5 minutes ago, popeye the sailor said:

are you going to mottle the wing root?......that would blend it in.  over all......a really cool camo scheme !

Yes indeed, it will be added. There are a lot of little details that need to be painted on as well as adding some parts to the wings. Right there on that little plate in the middle of each wing root go 4 turn buckles. Then there are more turn buckles that are added to other parts of the lower and upper wings as well as to the fuselage. The old WW1 era biplanes had lots of small bits and pieces scattered all over each aircraft. Some of the later aircraft, like the Fokker D.VII eliminated a lot of that to make the airframes more aerodynamic and slippery (faster 🙂).

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Posted (edited)
On 4/6/2019 at 7:35 PM, Richmond said:

The Wingnut Wings Website https://shop.wingnutwings.com/ has massive discounts (many greater than the 25% you quote) for the whole of April while stocks last if you buy direct.

I have ordered 6 different aircraft from WnW to take advantage of that massive sale. Even with postage from New Zealand, there's considerable savings to be realized from retail price in the USA.

 

PS:

I forgot to mention...unless I follow the link you provided, I cannot see the sale prices. I made a mistake initially by going a direct link to wingnutwings DOT com, but that will not show their sale. If someone else wants the sale prices, they need to click on the link you provided, not by going directly to wingnut wings main web address directly.

Edited by CDW

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2 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

hefty prices for those kits.........I do like the decal assortment though :) 

Yes, but you totally get what you pay for with them. There are no let-downs.

Besides plastic models, I am a long time scratch builder of flying model aircraft. Even when building from scratch, I will often spend more than the WnW kit prices to build and finish a WW1 airframe from balsa, plywood, spruce, basswood, tissue, and dope. So relatively speaking, their products are a bargain for the sale prices they are offering now.  

 

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16 minutes ago, CDW said:

Yes, but you totally get what you pay for with them. There are no let-downs.

Besides plastic models, I am a long time scratch builder of flying model aircraft. Even when building from scratch, I will often spend more than the WnW kit prices to build and finish a WW1 airframe from balsa, plywood, spruce, basswood, tissue, and dope. So relatively speaking, their products are a bargain for the sale prices they are offering now.  

 

I once dabbled in R/C  aircraft  as a young kid (well my late farther did  - I just sat at the table next to hime watching.

 

OC.

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Posted (edited)

 

25 minutes ago, Old Collingwood said:

I once dabbled in R/C  aircraft  as a young kid (well my late farther did  - I just sat at the table next to hime watching.

 

OC.

This is one of the last flying models I built before I rekindled my interest in plastic models. This is a 1/4 scale Fleet Biplane. The Fleet was a trainer purchased by the US Army Air Corps in the years prior to WW2. This particular model has a wingspan of 8 feet and is powered by a 1.8 cubic inch single cylinder four-stroke cycle engine that has been converted (by me) from glow plug to an electronic spark ignition system. It currently resides hanging from the rafters in my garage along with a number of other flying models. It is covered to protect it from the elements of dust and insects.

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Edited by CDW

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19 minutes ago, Old Collingwood said:

Wowzer......:o:oThats amazing work mate.

 

OC.

Thanks OC.

I started building these flying models when I was 9 or 10 years of age. I learned by reading hobby magazines, periodicals, and trial & error as no one in my family, particularly my father, was a builder. My first flying model was a Stuka built as a glow powered free flight model. It flew great, but I didn't understand how critical it was to time the amount of fuel the engine had remaining so as to limit the actual powered flight time. My model climbed, circled to the left and then dived down, repeated this cycle several times all while under power. Each cycle, the model came closer to the ground until finally, the wing tip caught the top of the grass then the thing cart wheeled and ripped the wings of it. I cleaned it up, rebuilt it, and kept it hanging on my wall as a reminder of the mistake I made with my first flying model. 

Had I carefully timed the amount of fuel remaining in the engine prior to launching it, so that the model only flew in a powered state for 15 seconds or so, it would have climbed while circling to the left, the engine would have shut down, then it would have glided gently to the right in a slow circle and landed. That was the intended path for a FF model to take. As a 9 year old, who knew? I did after the disaster. 😵

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Reminds me a little of my first free running ship model. My first powered model was the Lindburg Blue Devil destroyer. When I at last was able to come up with enough money to buy it I threw it together in a weekend or something and as it came with running gear and the "Cam" steering system I headed to the pond just as soon as I was able to get batteries.

 

Needless to say the wind that day was possibly hurricane force in scale knots for the destroyer but I was rather stupid and set her in and flipped the switch anyway. After all Lindburg had designed the model for sailing, said so on the box, what could go wrong?

 

The ship headed out to deeper water with only a slight list caused by the wind against the superstructure, but I was more interested in the destroyer like bow wave and waiting for the rudders to kick in and turn her back in. When she did start her turn it was into the wind and the combination of wind and the healing from the turn were enough to put the main deck under and she instantly  started taking on water! It only took a few seconds for my proud destroyer to do her impression of the Titanic and head for the bottom.

 

That was the first and only time I ever tried free sailing with the intent of getting the ship back. Years later I built my first RC model and discovered a whole new world.

 

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Great progress Craig, I really like the wing tape effect/shading brings the wing to life and the engine work is sweet.

 

Wingnut Wing kits are absolutely gorgeous.  I watch builds and reviews of them all the time.  I really want the Felixstowe (red/white striped one) but too big and too expensive (even with their sale) for me at the moment but it is a lot of kit!

 

Cheers

Slog

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59 minutes ago, Captain Slog said:

Great progress Craig, I really like the wing tape effect/shading brings the wing to life and the engine work is sweet.

Thanks Slog. I've been spending time watching experts reveal their painting techniques on Youtube videos and that's what I'm using here. Knowledge passed on by others. In this age of computers and internet, it's almost like the sky is the limit for instruction we could only dream of some years ago. 

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that's a darn nice looking plane you have there.   I've wanted to try the larger scale aircraft,  but......like with the wooden ship kits........too hesitant and doubtful to pull the trigger on one.   I had to have a wooden ship kit thrown in my lap,  to get me started.  {yea......I know....the admiral keeps telling me}.

   I did get back into flying aircraft a little.......I've built a Guillow's Spitfire Mk1,  and I have a Fokker Dr1 in the closet......got to sand everything.   to sit there and computer out a plane or ship is way above me {I'd be there forever}.  I have had reasonable luck with taking and bashing a kit to fit the bill.

 

love the paint job on 'er..........she looks so sweet!  ;) 

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